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Estatuto de los Trabajadores

English translation: Workers\' Statute

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Estatuto de los Trabajadores
English translation:Workers\' Statute
Entered by: Rachael West
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09:08 Nov 25, 2013
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Human Resources
Spanish term or phrase: Estatuto de los Trabajadores
I am interested to know if there is a standard equivalent to this in Europe. Thanks in advance for your help.


La jornada legal máxima viene regulada en el artículo 34.1 del Estatuto de los Trabajadores.
Rachael West
Spain
Local time: 08:09
Workers' Statute
Explanation:
This is what the EU calls it. Many references confirm this. Here's one:

"10. Article 26(1) and (2) of Legislative Royal Decree 1/1995 of 24 March 1995 approving the amended text of the Estatuto de los Trabajadores (Workers’ Statute) (BOE No 75 of 29 March 1995, p. 9654; ‘the Workers’ Statute’), provides:"

10. El artículo 26, apartados 1 y 2, del Real Decreto Legislativo 1/1995, de 24 de marzo, por el que se aprueba el Texto Refundido de la Ley del Estatuto de los Trabajadores (BOE nº 75, de 29 de marzo de 1995, p. 9654; en lo sucesivo, «Estatuto de los Trabajadores»), dispone:
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/Notice.do?mode=dbl&lang=en&ihmlang=...

Here too:
http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/emire/SPAIN/WORKERSSTATUTE-ES...

It's used for similar provisions in other countries too, such as Italy's Statuto dei Lavoratori:
http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/emire/ITALY/WORKERSSTATUTE-IT...


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Note added at 1 hr (2013-11-25 10:55:48 GMT)
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I think this is a perfectly defensible translation, but my answer is not based on the proposition that this is the best English equivalent for the Spanish term. It is addressed strictly to the terms of the question, which asks for a standard (i.e. established and widely used) equivalent in Europe (which I take to mean the EU).

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Note added at 7 hrs (2013-11-25 17:04:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Phil's right; you don't absolutely have to follow this precedent if you don't think it's suitable or that something else is better. But personally I think it's the best bet. I can't really see anything wrong with it, and it has the advantage of being very familiar and well established. You see it translated like that in many places (and the legal translators I know use this translation).

The law introducting it could be called the Workers' Statute Act:
https://www.boe.es/diario_boe/txt.php?id=BOE-A-1980-5683

I don't think "Workers' Rights Act", the answer accepted in the previous question, is ideal, since if you take a quick look at the Estatuto, you'll see that although a lot of it is about workers' rights, by no means all of it is. It sets out a basic legal framework for working conditions, and covers rights and duties of both employers and employees.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 08:09
Grading comment
Thanks for your input and refs. It is open to possible alternatives, but this is exactly how I chose to translate it.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1Workers' Statute
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Workers' Statute


Explanation:
This is what the EU calls it. Many references confirm this. Here's one:

"10. Article 26(1) and (2) of Legislative Royal Decree 1/1995 of 24 March 1995 approving the amended text of the Estatuto de los Trabajadores (Workers’ Statute) (BOE No 75 of 29 March 1995, p. 9654; ‘the Workers’ Statute’), provides:"

10. El artículo 26, apartados 1 y 2, del Real Decreto Legislativo 1/1995, de 24 de marzo, por el que se aprueba el Texto Refundido de la Ley del Estatuto de los Trabajadores (BOE nº 75, de 29 de marzo de 1995, p. 9654; en lo sucesivo, «Estatuto de los Trabajadores»), dispone:
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/Notice.do?mode=dbl&lang=en&ihmlang=...

Here too:
http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/emire/SPAIN/WORKERSSTATUTE-ES...

It's used for similar provisions in other countries too, such as Italy's Statuto dei Lavoratori:
http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/emire/ITALY/WORKERSSTATUTE-IT...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2013-11-25 10:55:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think this is a perfectly defensible translation, but my answer is not based on the proposition that this is the best English equivalent for the Spanish term. It is addressed strictly to the terms of the question, which asks for a standard (i.e. established and widely used) equivalent in Europe (which I take to mean the EU).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2013-11-25 17:04:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Phil's right; you don't absolutely have to follow this precedent if you don't think it's suitable or that something else is better. But personally I think it's the best bet. I can't really see anything wrong with it, and it has the advantage of being very familiar and well established. You see it translated like that in many places (and the legal translators I know use this translation).

The law introducting it could be called the Workers' Statute Act:
https://www.boe.es/diario_boe/txt.php?id=BOE-A-1980-5683

I don't think "Workers' Rights Act", the answer accepted in the previous question, is ideal, since if you take a quick look at the Estatuto, you'll see that although a lot of it is about workers' rights, by no means all of it is. It sets out a basic legal framework for working conditions, and covers rights and duties of both employers and employees.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 08:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64
Grading comment
Thanks for your input and refs. It is open to possible alternatives, but this is exactly how I chose to translate it.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Catarina Lopes
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ana :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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