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no quiero meterme en el barrillo

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13:56 Jul 14, 2008
This question was closed without grading. Reason: Other

Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
Spanish term or phrase: no quiero meterme en el barrillo
Commentary on a presentation:

"No quiero meterme en el barrillo" from day 1, but perhaps it is necessary...
BristolTEc
Ecuador
Local time: 16:54
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Summary of answers provided
3I don't want to go into too much detail/ cover too much
Lisa McCarthy
2I don't want to nitpick
Denise Nahigian
1I don't want to go into things too deeply
Carol Gullidge


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
I don't want to go into things too deeply


Explanation:
a pure guess, simply from the context given.

I don't want to go into things too deeply to start off with...

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:54
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 134
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I don't want to go into too much detail/ cover too much


Explanation:
- I agree with Carol that it may mean this but it would help to see the rest of the sentence to get a better idea.

Lisa McCarthy
Spain
Local time: 23:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 63
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49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
I don't want to nitpick


Language variant: I don't want to open a can of worms

Explanation:
I've never heard this expression, and the only definition I have for "barrillo" is "pimple (especially blackhead)." My thinking is that picking at a pimple is messy and painful and leaves scars, whereas just letting it heal is safe but takes longer. I'm thinking the expression is trying to convey that the person doesn't want to cause trouble unnecessarily, but might address the issue, anyway. Both of these expressions are commonly used in US English.

"As nitpicking inherently requires fastidious, meticulous attention to detail, the term has become appropriated to describe the practice of meticulously searching for minor, even trivial errors in detail (often referred to as "nits" as well), and then criticising them. "Nitpicker" in this sense was often used after 1951, predominantly in the United States."

"Metaphorically speaking, to open a can of worms means to inadvertently create numerous new problems while trying to solve one. Experts disagree on the origin of the phrase, but it is generally believed to be a Canadian or American metaphor coined sometime in the 1950s. Bait stores routinely sold cans of worms and other popular live baits to fishermen, who often discovered how easy it was to open a can of worms and how difficult it was to close one. Once the worms discovered an opportunity to escape, it became nearly impossible to keep them contained."


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitpicking
    Reference: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-it-mean-to-open-a-can-of-w...
Denise Nahigian
United States
Local time: 16:54
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
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