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olvido digital

English translation: data expiry / data expiration

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:olvido digital
English translation:data expiry / data expiration
Entered by: Wordalia
Options:
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12:48 Dec 28, 2010
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - IT (Information Technology) / data privacy/automatic data elimination
Spanish term or phrase: olvido digital
This is in a section of a document (from Catalonia) about online privacy and upcoming trends for controlling and managing digital data which users should keep an eye on.

I understand what the concept is, since it's glossed in my text, but I've been searching and haven't been able to find a direct equivalent in English. I know this came up in France, where they are trying to pass a law about it, but has the concept made its way to the English-speaking world yet?

The best I've been able to come up with is "(automatic) data elimination"

"Prestar atención a los conceptos de caja fuerte digital y olvido digital (eliminación de los datos obligatoriamente después de un cierto período de inactividad."

Thanks!
Wordalia
Switzerland
Local time: 01:32
data expiry
Explanation:
From the context given, I would suggest simply "data expiry". I would say that Spanish has more of a propensity than English to use "digital" to mean "to do with computers/technology" rather than meaning "digital" in any literal sense.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2010-12-28 16:48:01 GMT)
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P.S. If you're a US speaker, "expiration" may sound better (in UK English I would use "expiry").
Selected response from:

Neil Coffey
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:32
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone! There were lots of potential answers to this question that looked like they could have worked (and which I indeed found used in various contexts), but this seems to be the best general option. Thanks to everyone for your help with this question!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3data expiry
Neil Coffey
4 +1digital expiry/expiration
neilmac
4right to be forgotten
Charles Davis
5 -2digital oblivionConstantinos Faridis
3auto-delete
Paul Adie
4 -2data degradationPatrick Jones


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
digital oblivion


Explanation:
#
digital.oblivion

10 Jun 2010 ... digital.oblivion. musings on technology, design and ... digital.oblivion is the blog, portfolio, and sandbox of biomekanika. ...
www.brownbatterystudios.com/oblivion/ - Προσωρινά αποθηκευμένη
#
The Digital Oblivion (El Olvido Digital) Simposio sobre ...

3 Nov 2010 ... The Digital Oblivion. Substance and ethics in the conservation of computer-based art Peter Weibel, experto en new art media, los movimientos ...
www.entretodas.net/.../the-digital-oblivion-simposio-conser... -

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Note added at 38 λεπτά (2010-12-28 13:27:04 GMT)
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olvido digital y digital oblivion es la misma cosa

El derecho al olvido digital
Francia abre una consulta pública para devolver el control a los ciudadanos de la información que hay en la Red sobre ellos

MIGUEL ÁNGEL CRIADO MADRID 11/05/2010 08:30 Actualizado: 11/05/2010 11:13

#
THE «RIGHT TO (DIGITAL) OBLIVION» - 7th edition - march 2010 ...
- [ Μετάφραση αυτής της σελίδας ]
Freeware, fast, simple, and multilingual Content Management System. It is based on Flat Files, uses templates system, valid XHTML 1.1 and WAI.
www.fbccinewsletter.com/.../uk/?...«right...(digital)-oblivion»... - Προσωρινά αποθηκευμένη
#
Privacy and the “right to oblivion” « Inforrm's Blog
- [ Μετάφραση αυτής της σελίδας ]
16 Nov 2010 ... In 2009, the French Secretary of State in charge of the digital economy began a ... Tweets that mention Privacy and the “right to oblivion” ...
inforrm.wordpress.com/.../privacy-and-the-right-to-oblivion


Constantinos Faridis
Greece
Local time: 02:32
Native speaker of: Greek
PRO pts in category: 2
Notes to answerer
Asker: I saw this in my searches, but it doesn't look like it refers to the same concept...


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Neil Coffey: I think "oblivion" sounds too literary/abstract.
3 hrs

disagree  spanruss: Doesn't fit the description
8 hrs
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
digital expiry/expiration


Explanation:
Some people prefer "expiration" to "expiry", it may be a US vs Uk thing, I dont know.
In EDI, it refers to automatic DELETION or erasure of documents once a certain storage period, usually stipulated beforehand, is up.
I wouldn't use "elimination" myself... but that's up to you.

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Note added at 24 mins (2010-12-28 13:12:45 GMT)
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And... ahem.. I'd "forget" the oblivion too ...

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Note added at 1 hr (2010-12-28 14:18:37 GMT)
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In a more general context than that of data storage between client and service provider, some of the more homespun BBC or Daily Telegraph versions could indeed be used. My suggestion is to do with professional EDI for business purposes. It all depends on the tone you want in your final draft. Patrick´s is best in show so far IMO...

neilmac
Spain
Local time: 01:32
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 133
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks a lot, Neil. I think this is probably right: http://blogs.kuppingercole.com/cole/2010/08/07/a-right-to-forget/ "Another idea Mayer-Schonberger discusses is the concept of a “digital expiration date”; a technical system that would automatically erase personal data after a certain time." Thanks also for the tip on deletion instead of "elimination"! :-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Constantinos Faridis: THE «RIGHT TO (DIGITAL) OBLIVION» - 7th edition - march 2010 ... - [ Μετάφραση αυτής της σελίδας ] Freeware, fast, simple, and multilingual Content Management System. It is based on Flat Files, uses templates system, valid XHTML 1.1 and WAI. www.fbccinew
24 mins
  -> Pull the other one

agree  Patrick Jones: Also possible. I think in some contexts data degrades - some specificity is lost but a part of the data is maintained (e.g. when data becomes anonymous after a period of time) - but in others it simply expires and is deleted.
1 hr

neutral  Neil Coffey: But, see my comment below: Spanish tends to use "digital" a lot where in English it isn't the most natural choice.
3 hrs
  -> Yes, "data" expiry is a great option. My Spansh EDI client works with several countries worldwide so we tend to use terms that sound a bit more global than, say, UK usage, and they LOVE anything "digital".
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
right to be forgotten


Explanation:
This is a specific, current EU initiative emanating from France, and I think the formulation proposed, obviously derived from the French "oubli numérique", is so widely used in discussion of the subject that it is actually the best choice.

See UK news media:
"EU wants 'right to be forgotten' online
[...]
Top of the agenda will be a so called "right to be forgotten". European officials want to make it easier for us to permanently delete information about ourselves."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-11693026

"EU proposes online right 'to be forgotten'
Websites could be compelled to delete all data held on users at their request, if new European laws come into force."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/internet/8112702/EU-pr...

I would put "right to be forgotten" in inverted commas, as the BBC does.

One alternative is "personal data destruction":

"The Florida and Michigan laws would amend personal data destruction rules for companies."
http://www.workplaceprivacyreport.com/2010/01/articles/data-...

"Expiry/expiration" means planned self-deletion of data after a given period. "Degradation" means allow data to "fade away". The French proposal involves proactive deletion.

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Note added at 1 hr (2010-12-28 14:01:06 GMT)
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Note that the text for translation says "eliminación de los datos obligatoriamente", not "automáticamente": the data don't delete themselves, someone is legally obliged to delete them.

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Note added at 1 hr (2010-12-28 14:35:54 GMT)
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I don't want to get drawn into a debate here, but "right to be forgotten" is not a term dreamed up by the BBC; it's everywhere in debate on this issue. Literally millions of hits in all sorts of sites, including, of course, many IT ones (not just news media and blogs). I think the crucial issues here are: (a) whether the source text is referring specifically to the French-inspired EU initiative (which everyone seems to be calling "right to be forgotten"), and (b) whether it strictly means pre-planned self-destruction of data, or includes active deletion (albeit possibly by some automated method).

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Note added at 2 hrs (2010-12-28 15:20:05 GMT)
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I have looked a bit further at this and I honestly think the answer to (a) must be "yes"; in the context of digital privacy, the term "olvido digital" in Spanish seems to be used exclusively in relation to the French initiative. I don't think it was used in Spanish before that initiative arose (except perhaps sporadically as an improvised coinage). And if that is the case, then I believe that the answer to (b) is that active deletion is involved. If I am right about that, then a translation in the form "digital _____" or "data ______" will have to use something other than "expiry" or "degradation" as the second term, in my opinion.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 01:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  neilmac: The French also use "facture dematerialisee" when they mean digital invoice... which is a bit too Trekky for my liking. Great cuisine though...
16 mins
  -> :)
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
data expiry


Explanation:
From the context given, I would suggest simply "data expiry". I would say that Spanish has more of a propensity than English to use "digital" to mean "to do with computers/technology" rather than meaning "digital" in any literal sense.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2010-12-28 16:48:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

P.S. If you're a US speaker, "expiration" may sound better (in UK English I would use "expiry").

Neil Coffey
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone! There were lots of potential answers to this question that looked like they could have worked (and which I indeed found used in various contexts), but this seems to be the best general option. Thanks to everyone for your help with this question!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  spanruss: Yes, plenty of hits for "data expiration". Nice and general. The other options posted seem too specific, and don't sound like how the translation describes it.
4 hrs

agree  James A. Walsh
5 hrs

disagree  Constantinos Faridis: that' s nothing to do. expired is expiración. aquí no se trata de niunguna expiración de plazo!
15 hrs

agree  neilmac: Best answer so far, EVEN BETTER than mine. Season's greetings from sunny Scotland!
17 hrs

agree  Juan Ripoll
1 day 7 hrs
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37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
data degradation


Explanation:
This is a very interesting article...

https://www.privacyassociation.org/publications/2010_10_20_u...

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Note added at 48 mins (2010-12-28 13:37:01 GMT)
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Here it is used in a journal on the subject:

http://www-smis.inria.fr/~bouganim/Publis/BOUGA_IC19_ICDE_20...

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Note added at 52 mins (2010-12-28 13:40:21 GMT)
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If talking about the processing of the data, I would personally use "data degradation". If talking about the right I would use "right to be forgotten".

http://www.google.co.uk/#sclient=psy&hl=en&site=&source=hp&q...

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Note added at 4 hrs (2010-12-28 17:06:20 GMT)
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http://www.vanheerde.eu/phdthesis.pdf

"However, our intuition is that data should not be removed at once, but gradually, comparable to fading footsteps in the sand. By progressively degrading the privacy-sensitive information, more and more details will be removed from the data, making the data less privacy-sensitive. This makes it possible to search for a better balance between data usability and privacy. For example, a location can be stored with precise coordinates, making it possible to follow the trace of a car. This location can be degraded firstly to road number—still possible to use it to predict traffic jams—and finally to
road type—such that the driver can be charged for using specific roads.

Patrick Jones
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
Notes to answerer
Asker: This is also a very compelling answer. Thanks, Patrick. I imagine both this and "data expiration" could be correct, and would appreciate feedback from other translators as to their preferences between the two terms.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Constantinos Faridis: THE «RIGHT TO (DIGITAL) OBLIVION» - 7th edition - march 2010 ... - [ Μετάφραση αυτής της σελίδας ] Freeware, fast, simple, and multilingual Content Management System. It is based on Flat Files, uses templates system, valid XHTML 1.1 and WAI. www.fbccinew
2 mins

agree  neilmac: Technically possible, although degradation smacks to me of something involuntary, such as data corruption. The expiry term is set by agreement between EDI storage providers and their client users. in the corresponding SLA.
43 mins
  -> Expiry means deletion. Degradation means that the data might become anonymous after a period of time and be deleted at a later point. It is a more gradual process and is favoured by business since useful data can be stored for longer.

disagree  Neil Coffey: I really wouldn't use "degradation" -- it indeed implies corruption or involuntary loss of quality.
3 hrs
  -> Did you read the articles I provided links to and try to understand why degradation is used in these articles? The whole idea is that there is a loss of quality, but that it is intentional.

disagree  spanruss: "Degradation" is a gradual passive act. The description given implies an action taking place at a specific point in time.
8 hrs

disagree  Juan Ripoll: it is not degradation
1 day 10 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
auto-delete


Explanation:
Another option. I think this would suit the jargon-friendly field of computer science.

Happy translating!

Paul.

Paul Adie
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  neilmac: I see where yr coming from, but I don't like to encourage jargon as I struggle with it on a daily basis.
13 hrs
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