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ni le espanten vestiglos, ni le atemoricen endriagos

English translation: Beasties fill him not with dread, neither do manticores terrify him

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:ni le espanten vestiglos, ni le atemoricen endriagos
English translation:Beasties fill him not with dread, neither do manticores terrify him
Entered by: Chris Williams
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19:50 Oct 31, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Journalism
Spanish term or phrase: ni le espanten vestiglos, ni le atemoricen endriagos
This Cervantes describing the role of the knight errant as in Don Quijote de la Mancha
Greenwood
Beasties fill him not with dread, neither do manticores terrify him
Explanation:
As vestiglo comes from latin: besticulum the root of the word beast and beasties sounds a bit medieval, while an endriago is a monster with a human head but the body parts of other monsters (manticore) I chose these two as the closest to the original.
You are right not to look at other translations, be original!
Selected response from:

Chris Williams
Local time: 21:02
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4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2no monsters terrify him, no dragons make him quail
Miguel Llorens
4Beasties fill him not with dread, neither do manticores terrify him
Chris Williams


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
no monsters terrify him, no dragons make him quail


Explanation:
Two options. The one above from uncredited translation at:

http://www.online-literature.com/cervantes/don_quixote/75/

Or

"phantoms must not terrify him, nor dragons dismay
him;"

From the Smollett translation, which you can find in Google Print.

Miguel Llorens
Local time: 22:02
Native speaker of: Spanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: well there are n o dragons so this is a no go
3 mins
  -> I'm sure Smollett would be amused. Yes, there are no dragons. Does that mean there are a lot of endriagos hanging out in your neighborhood 7-11? ;o)

agree  moken: The Cervantes Project translates endriago and endrigo as dragon in their digital library: http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/cervantes/english/ctxt/dq_dictionar... :O) :O)
30 mins

agree  Gabriela Rodriguez
4 hrs
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Beasties fill him not with dread, neither do manticores terrify him


Explanation:
As vestiglo comes from latin: besticulum the root of the word beast and beasties sounds a bit medieval, while an endriago is a monster with a human head but the body parts of other monsters (manticore) I chose these two as the closest to the original.
You are right not to look at other translations, be original!

Chris Williams
Local time: 21:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
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