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KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Law: Taxation & Customs

reclamación económico-administrativa

English translation: appeal against a decision of the tax authorities

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:reclamación económico-administrativa
English translation:appeal against a decision of the tax authorities
Entered by: Amy Barter
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:33 Mar 9, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Taxation & Customs / Tax Appeal Board
Spanish term or phrase: reclamación económico-administrativa
In a letter to the Tribunal Económico-administrativo (which I've translated as 'Tax Appeal Board' on the basis of previous Proz entries), it talks about the 'escrito de interposición de ***reclamación económico-administrativa***'. I really don't like the term 'administrative-economic' in English as I don't think it really means anything. Does anyone have a better suggestion? (I've found 'escrito de interposición' translated various times on the EU website as application)
Amy Barter
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:04
appeal against/from a decision of the tax authorities
Explanation:
(or) tax appeal proceeding, etc.

You may choose to word this differently, but this is what "reclamación económico-administrativa" (as used in Spain) means.

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Note added at 17 mins (2007-03-09 11:51:15 GMT)
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Appeal against a tax decision | Business Link
When you can appeal against an HM Revenue & Customs notice or decision and an overview of the appeal process.
www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/action/detail?type=RESOURCES&...

Given the considerable length of time allowed for lodging an appeal against a tax decision – normally five years after the assessment year – a system giving ...
www.worldlii.org/eu/cases/ECHR/2002/618.html

Introduction; Appeal against a tax decision; Make a complaint to Companies Registry; Make a complaint to HM Revenue & Customs about tax; Make a complaint to ...
www.nibusinessinfo.co.uk/bdotg/action/detail?site=191&type=...

Appeal against a tax decision. You have the right to appeal if you disagree with HM Revenue & Customs about:. a decision, notice or enquiry result that is ...
www.insolvencyhelpline.co.uk/business_advice/taxes_returns_...





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Note added at 38 mins (2007-03-09 12:11:48 GMT)
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To offer a response to Matthew's observation: "appeal AGAINST" is British usage; "appeal FROM" is US usage. I assume bartera's translation is for a UK audience, but I included the US option just in case.

For info, I am copying an interesting explanatin from Bryan Garner's "Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage" 2nd ed., Oxford University Press, 1995 (long examples omitted):

"Depending on the context, "appeal" may be either intransitive or transitive in American English. Usually one appeals FROM a judgment. Nearly as often, however, "appeal" is used transitively in American English. In British English, in which the transitive use has been obsolete since the late 16th century, one appeals AGAINST a lower court's decree."
Selected response from:

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 14:04
Grading comment
Thanks Rebecca - great explanation!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1appeal against/from a decision of the tax authoritiesRebecca Jowers


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
appeal against/from a decision of the tax authorities


Explanation:
(or) tax appeal proceeding, etc.

You may choose to word this differently, but this is what "reclamación económico-administrativa" (as used in Spain) means.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2007-03-09 11:51:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Appeal against a tax decision | Business Link
When you can appeal against an HM Revenue & Customs notice or decision and an overview of the appeal process.
www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/action/detail?type=RESOURCES&...

Given the considerable length of time allowed for lodging an appeal against a tax decision – normally five years after the assessment year – a system giving ...
www.worldlii.org/eu/cases/ECHR/2002/618.html

Introduction; Appeal against a tax decision; Make a complaint to Companies Registry; Make a complaint to HM Revenue & Customs about tax; Make a complaint to ...
www.nibusinessinfo.co.uk/bdotg/action/detail?site=191&type=...

Appeal against a tax decision. You have the right to appeal if you disagree with HM Revenue & Customs about:. a decision, notice or enquiry result that is ...
www.insolvencyhelpline.co.uk/business_advice/taxes_returns_...





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2007-03-09 12:11:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To offer a response to Matthew's observation: "appeal AGAINST" is British usage; "appeal FROM" is US usage. I assume bartera's translation is for a UK audience, but I included the US option just in case.

For info, I am copying an interesting explanatin from Bryan Garner's "Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage" 2nd ed., Oxford University Press, 1995 (long examples omitted):

"Depending on the context, "appeal" may be either intransitive or transitive in American English. Usually one appeals FROM a judgment. Nearly as often, however, "appeal" is used transitively in American English. In British English, in which the transitive use has been obsolete since the late 16th century, one appeals AGAINST a lower court's decree."

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 14:04
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88
Grading comment
Thanks Rebecca - great explanation!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Matthew Smith: Yes, but not "from", I believe
7 mins
  -> Thanks Matthew. This is a difference in British and American usage. I will post and explanation above.
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