Patrimonio artístico inmueble y mueble

English translation: Moveable and immoveable

09:03 Jul 21, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Law: Contract(s) / Loan Agreement
Spanish term or phrase: Patrimonio artístico inmueble y mueble
Hello!!

I am translating a Loan Agreement. The person representing one of the parties is the "Subdirector general del patrimonio artístico inmueble y mueble". So my guess is "Deputy managing director of Artistic Heritage property" But then what would the difference be between mueble and inmueble???


Many thanks for your help!!
Pamela Olea
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:18
English translation:Moveable and immoveable
Explanation:
It’s talking about tangible cultural assets that can be moved (e.g. paintings, books), and those that can’t (well, not easily), such as buildings.

The Wikipedia page here mentions a bit about it:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_heritage


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Note added at 22 mins (2018-07-21 09:25:24 GMT)
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Edited to add this as I couldn't copy paste properly on my mobile:

This is the section on the wikipedia page:
Cultural property includes the physical, or "tangible" cultural heritage, such as artworks. These are generally split into two groups of movable and immovable heritage. Immovable heritage includes building so (which themselves may include installed art such as organs, stained glass windows, and frescos), large industrial installations or other historic places and monuments. Moveable heritage includes books, documents, moveable artworks, machines, clothing, and other artifacts, that are considered worthy of preservation for the future. These include objects significant to the archaeology, architecture, science or technology of a specified culture.

For the sake of completeness, note the distinction here is between real objects that can be moved (mueble, e.g. artwork, tools, documents) and can't be moved (inmueble, like a building). It is not talking about the difference between tangible (artwork, books and building) and intangible (songs, dance, recipes), even though you could argue the latter can't be moved physically.

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Note added at 24 mins (2018-07-21 09:27:50 GMT)
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And here's a brief description of the differences from UNESCO:

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/culture/themes/illicit-traffick...
Selected response from:

John Druce
Spain
Local time: 21:18
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Moveable and immoveable
John Druce


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Moveable and immoveable


Explanation:
It’s talking about tangible cultural assets that can be moved (e.g. paintings, books), and those that can’t (well, not easily), such as buildings.

The Wikipedia page here mentions a bit about it:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_heritage


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2018-07-21 09:25:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Edited to add this as I couldn't copy paste properly on my mobile:

This is the section on the wikipedia page:
Cultural property includes the physical, or "tangible" cultural heritage, such as artworks. These are generally split into two groups of movable and immovable heritage. Immovable heritage includes building so (which themselves may include installed art such as organs, stained glass windows, and frescos), large industrial installations or other historic places and monuments. Moveable heritage includes books, documents, moveable artworks, machines, clothing, and other artifacts, that are considered worthy of preservation for the future. These include objects significant to the archaeology, architecture, science or technology of a specified culture.

For the sake of completeness, note the distinction here is between real objects that can be moved (mueble, e.g. artwork, tools, documents) and can't be moved (inmueble, like a building). It is not talking about the difference between tangible (artwork, books and building) and intangible (songs, dance, recipes), even though you could argue the latter can't be moved physically.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2018-07-21 09:27:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And here's a brief description of the differences from UNESCO:

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/culture/themes/illicit-traffick...

John Druce
Spain
Local time: 21:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilmac
1 hr

agree  AllegroTrans
3 hrs

agree  David Hollywood
4 hrs

neutral  Francois Boye: Moveable and immoveable heritage
9 hrs

agree  TomWalker
1 day 11 hrs
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