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relación laboral o estatutaria

English translation: employment relationship

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11:00 Nov 21, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
Spanish term or phrase: relación laboral o estatutaria
Again, from text on the classification of earnings:

Son contraprestaciones que normalmente derivan de una relación laboral o estatutaria (como los sueldos, salarios, dietas, etc) y que no presentan dificultad alguna para su calificación como rendimientos del trabajo.

I'm mainly interested in "estatutaria". Having to do with the articles of association? How would we eloquently word this?
TIA!
Sherry Godfrey
Local time: 20:25
English translation:employment relationship
Explanation:
In Spain, the government can employ people in two ways: as "funcionarios del estado" or as simple employees. Funcionarios have a "relación estatutaria", they are almost impossible to fire, and there is a whole slew of other related regulations. In contrast, plain employees are subject to ordinary labour law. So in a given hospital, for example, you may have nurses who are "estatutarios" and nurses who are "laborales". It's hard to say which is better, since sometimes the "laborales" get a pay rise while "estatutarios" are not entitled...
Short answer, it is a distinction which is meaningless in English, particularly in the context of your question.
Selected response from:

John Rynne
Local time: 20:25
Grading comment
Thanks to you both- interesting debate. And thanks John for the detailed explanation - very informative. You are right, in this context I can skip the distinction because it is about self-employed versus employed. (And sorry for the delay in grading!)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1employment relationship
John Rynne
3under labour or statutory contract(s)
AllegroTrans
Summary of reference entries provided
estatutario
Christine Walsh

  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
employment relationship


Explanation:
In Spain, the government can employ people in two ways: as "funcionarios del estado" or as simple employees. Funcionarios have a "relación estatutaria", they are almost impossible to fire, and there is a whole slew of other related regulations. In contrast, plain employees are subject to ordinary labour law. So in a given hospital, for example, you may have nurses who are "estatutarios" and nurses who are "laborales". It's hard to say which is better, since sometimes the "laborales" get a pay rise while "estatutarios" are not entitled...
Short answer, it is a distinction which is meaningless in English, particularly in the context of your question.

John Rynne
Local time: 20:25
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 288
Grading comment
Thanks to you both- interesting debate. And thanks John for the detailed explanation - very informative. You are right, in this context I can skip the distinction because it is about self-employed versus employed. (And sorry for the delay in grading!)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MikeGarcia: Bull's eye...
1 min
  -> Thank you, Miguel

neutral  AllegroTrans: the distinction may be meaningless in England, but surely you need to translate it?
2 hrs
  -> I disagree. It's too nit-picky. The difference is between the salary of a civil servant with lifetime tenure and that of a public employee without such tenure. Writers' conclusion: it makes no difference in the context.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
under labour or statutory contract(s)


Explanation:
I must admit that I have cribbed my understanding of the terms from John Rynne's answer, but I disagree with his assertin that this is untranslatable. The person on the receiving end needs to know what is meant by this distinction. You could of course add a translator's note, although I myself only do this when I am quite certain that I know what I am talking about!

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:25
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1269
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Reference comments


3 hrs
Reference: estatutario

Reference information:
a person who is employed according to a special statute from a public governmental office. • adj statutory: a) according or relating to statutes. b) enacted, created or regulated by statute

Christine Walsh
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 56
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