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fuerza sobre las cosas

English translation: forcible entry

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17:05 Dec 23, 2010
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / sentencia penal - robo con fuerza
Spanish term or phrase: fuerza sobre las cosas
La altura del balcón en este caso constituía un obstáculo que obligó al acusado al empleo de una energía criminal equiparable a la fuerza sobre las cosas.
Lavinia Pirlog
Romania
Local time: 13:06
English translation:forcible entry
Explanation:
.

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Note added at 49 minutos (2010-12-23 17:54:34 GMT)
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The way I read it is that the height of the balcony was sufficient obstacle to constitute forcible entry (even though perhaps the door or window was not damaged.)
Selected response from:

John Marais
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3forcible entryJohn Marais
5burglary (in this context)Rebecca Jowers


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
burglary (in this context)


Explanation:
If this text is from Spain and the expression "robo con fuerza en las cosas" is used, this is the Spanish criminal code counterpart of "burglary". Although more context would be helpful, your text appears to be is saying that the height of the balcony rendered the criminal act tantamount to burglary.

For info, in Spain:

"robo con fuerza (en las cosas)" = burglary
"robo con violencia (e intimidación en las personas)" = robbery

El proceso penal en la Unión Europea: garantías esenciales
Montserrat de Hoyos Sancho - 2008 - Education - 431 pages
In these cases, the application of the specific provision in the last paragraph of Article 239 has normally led to charges of «robo con fuerza (burglary)» ...
books.google.com/books?isbn=8484068811...

En cuanto al robo con fuerza en la vivienda (burglary), mientras que. Chile ...
www.lyd.com/lyd/bajar.aspx?archivo=/LYD/Controls/.../Neo......

efecto en algunos crímenes contra la propiedad: (burglary) robo con fuerza en las cosas y (robbery) robo con violencia.116 Según Blumstein, ...
www.dpenal.cl/politcrim//n_02/d_4_2.pdf

-The total for theft is calculated by adding: Theft without force (“hurto”) + Burglary (“robo con fuerza en las cosas”) + Theft of a motor vehicle + Theft ...
www.europeansourcebook.org/editie3_doc/esb3full.doc





Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 12:06
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2074

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Sandro Tomasi: Overall source context may be comparable to burglary. However, I believe asker needs a translation for an element of a crime, not a crime itself. // I don't accept "robo con fuerza" = "burglary" cause former is theft crime, latter is trespassing crime.
7 mins
  -> Nevertheless, in Spain lawyers and crim law professors equate "robo con fuerza" as used in the Spanish Criminal Code to be the Spanish counterpart of "burglary."

neutral  philgoddard: I do see your reasoning, but I think John's solution works better in this context - the question is not whether a burglary took place, but whether forcible entry was involved.
23 mins
  -> The text says that the height of the balcony rendered the criminal act tantamount to "fuerza en las cosas", which Spanish lawyers translate as "burglary." "Forcible entry" is "allanamiento (de morada) in Spain.

agree  Toni Castano: "Fuerza en las cosas" means nothing outside the context of "robo" (burglary) and some other less relevant cases. So yes, your answer is correct, but only for Spain. Asker does not say what country the translation is for. Actually, asker clarifies nothing.
18 hrs
  -> Thanks Toni. I assumed the text was from Spain, but it would be useful if the asker could clarify that point.
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
forcible entry


Explanation:
.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 49 minutos (2010-12-23 17:54:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The way I read it is that the height of the balcony was sufficient obstacle to constitute forcible entry (even though perhaps the door or window was not damaged.)

John Marais
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rebecca Jowers: Hi John, most of the Spanish lawyers I work with equate "forcible entry" or "breaking and entering" with "allanamiento de morada", and use "burglary" to translate "robo con fuerza".
2 mins
  -> Thanks for the input. Do you have a translation?

agree  Sandro Tomasi: I was initially thinking that "fuerza sobre las cosas" could be translated as "unlawful physical force," but your proposed term, "forcible entry," clearly tells us that you understood the context from the beginning. Excellent job!
4 mins
  -> thanks Sandro

agree  Liz Slaney: I think this covers an insistence to enter a premises illegally.
15 mins
  -> thanks Liz

agree  philgoddard
24 mins
  -> thamks phil
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