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sobrevenientes a futuro

English translation: arising at a later stage

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:sobrevenientes a futuro
English translation:arising at a later stage
Entered by: Charles Davis
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07:50 Aug 26, 2014
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Law on arbitration (Chile)
Spanish term or phrase: sobrevenientes a futuro
Here's the context

A continuación, señaló que la mayoría de las concesiones en Chile han sido renegociadas no sólo porque existen elementos imprevistos, **sobrevenientes a futuro**, o solicitudes por parte del Estado de mejoramiento de obras, sino porque es evidente que al momento que una concesionaria inicia una concesión adquiere un poder enorme y tiene la posibilidad de mejorar las condiciones iniciales, lo que constituye una manifestación de que el sistema presenta problemas y estos aspectos deben ser corregidos con apego a la ley.
Muriel Vasconcellos
United States
Local time: 23:20
arising at a later stage
Explanation:
The sense of "a futuro" is generally "in future", that is, after the concession has been granted. "Sobrevenir a futuro" is used to mean "arise in (the) future", as here, for example:

"Éste es un claro problema de salud pública que podría sobrevenir a futuro (esperemos que no)"
http://www1.rionegro.com.ar/diario/2008/11/05/imprimir.12258...

But in English we can only use "in the future" when it refers to the future in absolute terms, from the speaker's perspective; here it is part of a general statement about concessions, and the "future" is relative to a moment that is not the present from the speaker's perspective. I didn't realise you could use it like this in Spanish, but evidently you can. So I think you have to say something like "subsequently" or "after the event", or, as I've suggested, "at a later stage". Possibly even "a posteriori", though perhaps that sounds a bit too philosophical in English.

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Note added at 2 hrs (2014-08-26 10:32:38 GMT)
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That's how I read it, yes, I take "sobrevenientes a futuro" to be an adjectival clause qualifying "elementos". I don't think the comma after "imprevistos" conflicts with this reading, since in my reading "sobrevenientes a futuro" is "explicativo" rather than "especificativo", in RAE terminology:

"1.1.2. Adjetivos explicativos pospuestos al sustantivo u oraciones adjetivas explicativas: Los soldados, cansados, volvieron al campamento con dos horas de retraso (se explica que los soldados estaban cansados, de ahí que se retrasaran); o La casa, que está al borde del mar, es muy luminosa (se explica que la casa de la que se habla está al borde del mar). Por el contrario, si el adjetivo o la oración adjetiva tienen función especificativa, no se escriben entre comas: Los soldados cansados volvieron al campamento con dos horas de retraso (se especifica que, del total de los soldados, algunos, los que estaban cansados, llegaron con retraso); o La casa que está al borde del mar es muy luminosa (se especifica que, de entre todas las casas que hay en una zona determinada, se habla de la que está situada al borde del mar)."
http://lema.rae.es/dpd/?key=coma

"sobrevenientes a futuro" doesn't specify which sort of "elementos imprevistos" they are, but rather explains that they arise later. In common English grammatical terminology this phrase is non-restrictive, so the commas before and after it are to be expected.

Moreover, although "sobrevenientes" could in principle be a noun, I think this usage would be unusual.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 08:20
Grading comment
Thanks, Charles!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5arising at a later stage
Charles Davis


  

Answers


30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
arising at a later stage


Explanation:
The sense of "a futuro" is generally "in future", that is, after the concession has been granted. "Sobrevenir a futuro" is used to mean "arise in (the) future", as here, for example:

"Éste es un claro problema de salud pública que podría sobrevenir a futuro (esperemos que no)"
http://www1.rionegro.com.ar/diario/2008/11/05/imprimir.12258...

But in English we can only use "in the future" when it refers to the future in absolute terms, from the speaker's perspective; here it is part of a general statement about concessions, and the "future" is relative to a moment that is not the present from the speaker's perspective. I didn't realise you could use it like this in Spanish, but evidently you can. So I think you have to say something like "subsequently" or "after the event", or, as I've suggested, "at a later stage". Possibly even "a posteriori", though perhaps that sounds a bit too philosophical in English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2014-08-26 10:32:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

That's how I read it, yes, I take "sobrevenientes a futuro" to be an adjectival clause qualifying "elementos". I don't think the comma after "imprevistos" conflicts with this reading, since in my reading "sobrevenientes a futuro" is "explicativo" rather than "especificativo", in RAE terminology:

"1.1.2. Adjetivos explicativos pospuestos al sustantivo u oraciones adjetivas explicativas: Los soldados, cansados, volvieron al campamento con dos horas de retraso (se explica que los soldados estaban cansados, de ahí que se retrasaran); o La casa, que está al borde del mar, es muy luminosa (se explica que la casa de la que se habla está al borde del mar). Por el contrario, si el adjetivo o la oración adjetiva tienen función especificativa, no se escriben entre comas: Los soldados cansados volvieron al campamento con dos horas de retraso (se especifica que, del total de los soldados, algunos, los que estaban cansados, llegaron con retraso); o La casa que está al borde del mar es muy luminosa (se especifica que, de entre todas las casas que hay en una zona determinada, se habla de la que está situada al borde del mar)."
http://lema.rae.es/dpd/?key=coma

"sobrevenientes a futuro" doesn't specify which sort of "elementos imprevistos" they are, but rather explains that they arise later. In common English grammatical terminology this phrase is non-restrictive, so the commas before and after it are to be expected.

Moreover, although "sobrevenientes" could in principle be a noun, I think this usage would be unusual.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 08:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1220
Grading comment
Thanks, Charles!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hi Charles! So you think it refers to "elementos imprevistos"? Because of the comma I thought it was a new condition. However, this text is a transcription and the punctuation may be off.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alejandro Alcaraz Sintes: De acuerdo con tu análisis gramatical.
3 hrs
  -> Gracias y saludos, Alejandro :) Me alegro.

agree  Martin Harvey: As clear as an unmudded lake!
5 hrs
  -> LOL! Thanks, Martin :)

agree  Marina Ilari
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marina :)

agree  Jose Lobos: Yes, "at" better than "in"
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, José :) I think so.

agree  Gallagy
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gallagy :)
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Changes made by editors
Aug 31, 2014 - Changes made by Charles Davis:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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