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amenazar (in a particular context)

English translation: threaten

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:amenazar (in a particular context)
English translation:threaten
Entered by: Sam D
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11:11 Jan 7, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents / political asylum
Spanish term or phrase: amenazar (in a particular context)
"El cuerpo presentaba signos de ser torturado y amenazado, tambien presentaba varios impactos de arma de fuego en diferentes partes del cuerpo."
Police report of corpse found in Colombia. Normally, I know 'amenazar' is to threaten; however, I don't see how a corpse can show signs of having been threatened, tortured yes. Does 'amenazado' have any other (more marginal or regional) meanings that would apply? Sorry for the subject matter, but obviously, I have to be cautious and get this right. I realise it may just be loose use of language, which I may have to translate 'tal cual'.
Sam D
Local time: 03:11
comment
Explanation:
I'm afraid you are dealing with a poor original. What did the writer mean? Who knows! :-)
In Spanish, "un cadaver con signos de amenaza" makes no sense; as it makes no sense in English either, I would translate it as "threatened (sic)".

Good luck and best regards,

Patricia
Selected response from:

Patricia Lutteral
Argentina
Local time: 00:11
Grading comment
Thanks for your help in this rather unpleasant text (but someone has to do it). In the absence of anyone coming up with a regional or marginal meaning for 'amenazar', I think yours is definitely the best answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1if you say "having been threatened and tortured"
Parrot
4 +1comment
Patricia Lutteral
4 +1threatened
Robert INGLEDEW
4under threat of / on pain of death
Sue Horn
3harrassed?
Valeria Verona
2signs of stress?
Hermeneutica


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
signs of stress?


Explanation:
I am not from Colombia, and I can't really think of physiological changes that may be either obvious to the naked eye or discovered on autopsy that would occur by being threatened (the resulting stress would show in adrenaline levels, pallor or flushing sweat, etc.) but that would not equally be there as a result of torture.

So if you feel you need to keep that element and don't find out any better, then this would be my suggestion.

Good luck!

Dee

Hermeneutica
Switzerland
Local time: 04:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 52
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
harrassed?


Explanation:
I'm not sure but I think what it means is more or less the same as tortured, but "lighter".

Valeria Verona
Argentina
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 318
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
threatened


Explanation:
It seems as if the tortures and the threats went together: small cuts inflicted with a knife are the prelude or foreplay of larger cuts, each punch would be harder than the previous one, gradually increasing, each kick would be more violent, and the expression or traces of all this would remain on the face of the victim even after death. Torture is generally used to oblige the victim to say, confess or do something, and this in itself is a threat of more torture. Torture is always accompanied by threat, and the signs of the suffering remain. People are normally tortured in order to obtain information, or to get a ransom from relatives. Maybe they obliged the victim to phone his relatives requesting a ransom, in which case the threat would have been more evident.

I hate to talk about all this, but it is necessary in my opinion to clarify the issue. If there is a more specific word, I have not been able to find it.

Robert INGLEDEW
Argentina
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 1940

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Valeria Verona: I agree with the explanation! :-)
1 min
  -> Thank you, Valeria.
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
comment


Explanation:
I'm afraid you are dealing with a poor original. What did the writer mean? Who knows! :-)
In Spanish, "un cadaver con signos de amenaza" makes no sense; as it makes no sense in English either, I would translate it as "threatened (sic)".

Good luck and best regards,

Patricia


Patricia Lutteral
Argentina
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 505
Grading comment
Thanks for your help in this rather unpleasant text (but someone has to do it). In the absence of anyone coming up with a regional or marginal meaning for 'amenazar', I think yours is definitely the best answer.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrea Bullrich: lindo el texto y el tema :-(
2 hrs
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37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
if you say "having been threatened and tortured"


Explanation:
which is more logical, you wouldn't be betraying the sense of the original.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 04:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrea Bullrich
2 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
under threat of / on pain of death


Explanation:
"Amenazar" is used in a very strange way in this unfortunate context. It is very common to see this type of wording in theapers and in forensic reports. This is how I would render it. It is up to you to decide whether "extensive" fits in with the rest of the signs of torture documented in your text. That is why I have left it in parentheses.

"The body showed (extensive) signs of torture under threat of / on pain of death; there were also various gunshot wounds on different parts of the body."

Sue Horn
United States
Local time: 22:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 118
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