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el saldo al dia de la fecha asciende a

English translation: the current balance amounts to

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase: el saldo al dia de la fecha asciende a
English translation:the current balance amounts to
Entered by: Mec1g
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02:08 Aug 24, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Spanish term or phrase: el saldo al dia de la fecha asciende a
Que en dicha cuenta el saldo al dia de la fecha asciende a...
Mec1g
the current balance amounts to
Explanation:
Or, more simply, "the current balance is".

"El dia de la fecha" is a bloviator's way of saying "today".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-24 14:35:56 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Re the possibility that \"dia de la fecha\" may mean a specified date in the past, rather than \"today\'s date\"---

First, \"dia de la fecha\" doesn\'t refer to a date. It refers to a day. Today. Yesterday. A week ago Tuesday. Not August 24. But that\'s a nitpick, so let\'s ignore it and go on.

Literally, of course, \"dia de la fecha\" means \"day of the date\". The \"date\" referred to is the date of the document in which the phrase appears.

I suppose there\'s an argument available that, in the case of a predated document, \"dia de la fecha\" doesn\'t mean \"today\'s date\", but rather \"the date above\", or \"the date of this document\", or some such. This clearly isn\'t the case in the language presented for translation, which uses \"asciende\" (present tense) rather than ascendiO\" (referring to the past).

Indeed, even if this were a predated document I would maintain the present tense in the Spanish, and translate using \"current\", or \"today\". That is, predating a document changes more than its date. It places the author\'s voice in the past, too, and he speaks as if he were speaking on the day indicated by the date of the document.

Please understand that this is a discussion of translation, not legaliity or ethics. Predated documents are almost always a bad idea, fraught with implications of fraud.
Selected response from:

Paul Slocomb
Local time: 01:12
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, Paul. I´d like to ask you more questions...!Legal "formulas" drive me nuts!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5balance this date:Herman Vilella
5the balance as of this date, totals $______
Maria
5the current balance amounts toPaul Slocomb


  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the current balance amounts to


Explanation:
Or, more simply, "the current balance is".

"El dia de la fecha" is a bloviator's way of saying "today".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-24 14:35:56 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Re the possibility that \"dia de la fecha\" may mean a specified date in the past, rather than \"today\'s date\"---

First, \"dia de la fecha\" doesn\'t refer to a date. It refers to a day. Today. Yesterday. A week ago Tuesday. Not August 24. But that\'s a nitpick, so let\'s ignore it and go on.

Literally, of course, \"dia de la fecha\" means \"day of the date\". The \"date\" referred to is the date of the document in which the phrase appears.

I suppose there\'s an argument available that, in the case of a predated document, \"dia de la fecha\" doesn\'t mean \"today\'s date\", but rather \"the date above\", or \"the date of this document\", or some such. This clearly isn\'t the case in the language presented for translation, which uses \"asciende\" (present tense) rather than ascendiO\" (referring to the past).

Indeed, even if this were a predated document I would maintain the present tense in the Spanish, and translate using \"current\", or \"today\". That is, predating a document changes more than its date. It places the author\'s voice in the past, too, and he speaks as if he were speaking on the day indicated by the date of the document.

Please understand that this is a discussion of translation, not legaliity or ethics. Predated documents are almost always a bad idea, fraught with implications of fraud.

Paul Slocomb
Local time: 01:12
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 351
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, Paul. I´d like to ask you more questions...!Legal "formulas" drive me nuts!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxR.J.Chadwick: Just a query: Does "dia de la fecha" mean "today's date" or a specified date in the past? Depending on that your interpretation could be correct.
8 mins
  -> See note added above.
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38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the balance as of this date, totals $______


Explanation:
this another way, although I agree with Paul that "the current balance total $_____" will also do.

Saludos. Maria ;o)

Maria
Local time: 01:12
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 920
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
balance this date:


Explanation:
keep it brief, save labor and material.

Herman Vilella
Local time: 08:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 344
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