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Notifíquese.

English translation: (legalese:) Let it be so published.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Notifíquese.
English translation:(legalese:) Let it be so published.
Entered by: Andrea Wells
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13:35 Aug 15, 2001
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Spanish term or phrase: Notifíquese.
This word stands alone as a complete sentence in a list of resolutions in a Mexican judge's adoption decree. The previous point (QUINTO) stated that a certified copy was to be submitted to the Civil Registry. Then:

SEXTO: Notifíquese. Así, definitivamente juzgando lo sentenció y firma el Ciudadano Juez Primero de lo Civil, Miguel Angel Palacio...
Alan Lambson
Local time: 16:00
(legalese:) Let it be so published.
Explanation:
That's how "notifiquese" is often rendered in English. The sense of it is, of course, that the proper notices should be published in the customary way (e.g., in the civil gazette, court bulletin, etc.). "Disclosed" is also used, but not nearly so often.

Hope this helps,
HC
Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 15:00
Grading comment
Thanks, Heathcliff! I pretty much knew what it meant, but not how to say it in plausible legal English.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1(legalese:) Let it be so published.Heathcliff
naLet notice issue or Let notice be issued
Maria
naLet the proper authorities be notified.
Asuncion Ferrer


  

Answers


28 mins peer agreement (net): +1
(legalese:) Let it be so published.


Explanation:
That's how "notifiquese" is often rendered in English. The sense of it is, of course, that the proper notices should be published in the customary way (e.g., in the civil gazette, court bulletin, etc.). "Disclosed" is also used, but not nearly so often.

Hope this helps,
HC

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 15:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 843
Grading comment
Thanks, Heathcliff! I pretty much knew what it meant, but not how to say it in plausible legal English.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Terry Burgess
52 mins
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42 mins
Let the proper authorities be notified.


Explanation:
I have experience in legal documents in Venezuela. Here most decrees are submitted to the Civil Registry Office first and then published, thus, the expression in Spanish: Regístrese y publíquese. It seems that in México they are submitted to the Civil Registry Office and then, the interested parties are notified (notifíquese).

Asuncion Ferrer
Local time: 15:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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3 hrs
Let notice issue or Let notice be issued


Explanation:
is another way of stating it.


Saludos afectuosos. Maria ;o)


Maria
Local time: 17:00
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 920
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