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"mortis causa"

English translation: transferred due to death

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16:03 Aug 10, 2000
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Spanish term or phrase: "mortis causa"
OK! I know its Latin.. but the source text is Spanish.
Here is the context:
"en el caso de transmission mortis causa de las acciones o a titulo lucrativo o gratuito".

The Latin being in italics in the original. Sio, should I leave it as is?

Plus what does the last bit mean exactly?
Berni Armstrong
Local time: 21:53
English translation:transferred due to death
Explanation:
"in the event that shares are transferred due to death, or for profit, or freely."
Sounds like they're trying to cover any eventuality--whatever it is will apply whether shares are sold, given away, or the owner croaks.
"Causa" is Latin ablative case, if I recall correctly. If a Latin phrase would not be common in the corresponding English, it should probably be translated--especially if it would not be understood.
Selected response from:

Phillip Berryman
Local time: 15:53
Grading comment
Thanks,

these were all good answers and advice. I'm giving it to the first to answer... which I tend to do when stuck on deciding whop gets the points.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na...and a great big razzberry to whichever of my so-called "peers"Heathcliff
na((seconding pberrymn, and expanding))Heathcliff
namortis causaBAQMIA
natransferred due to deathPhillip Berryman


  

Answers


54 mins
transferred due to death


Explanation:
"in the event that shares are transferred due to death, or for profit, or freely."
Sounds like they're trying to cover any eventuality--whatever it is will apply whether shares are sold, given away, or the owner croaks.
"Causa" is Latin ablative case, if I recall correctly. If a Latin phrase would not be common in the corresponding English, it should probably be translated--especially if it would not be understood.

Phillip Berryman
Local time: 15:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 147
Grading comment
Thanks,

these were all good answers and advice. I'm giving it to the first to answer... which I tend to do when stuck on deciding whop gets the points.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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1 hr
mortis causa


Explanation:
mortis causa, in expectation of death
(Robb Legal Dictionary).

If Latin is used in the original, you may use the same in your translation. I would simply put it in italics, just as attorneys do in the U.S.

I believe one should not change register. Therefore, it Latin is used, by all means leave it that way. It is up to them to interpret or explain the document to others.

HTH

BAQMIA
Local time: 15:53
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 51

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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2 hrs
((seconding pberrymn, and expanding))


Explanation:
A bit of translation philosophy, here. Granted, the Latin legal tags should stay in Latin, partly on the theory that lawyers reading the translation will understand them, and partly because -- well, because Latin is Latin, and should be honored. However, not every reader of the English document may be a lawyer or a classicist, and part of our job as translators is to convey meaning, wherever it lies. The solution I've adopted is to leave the Latin in Latin (in italics, of course) and then add a short English explanation in brackets after it, thus:

"If the shares are transferred, _mortis causa_ [due to death], for profit, or free of charge..."

My clients seem quite happy with this compromise, and sometimes take the trouble to thank me for what they see as a bit of extra effort on their behalf.

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 12:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 843

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
BAQMIA
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22 hrs
...and a great big razzberry to whichever of my so-called "peers"


Explanation:
awarded my answer a zero. Pfui.

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 12:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 843
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