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taco (in this context)

English translation: curse word, expletive

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:taco
English translation:curse word, expletive
Entered by: Ramon Somoza
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16:14 Nov 20, 2013
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
Spanish term or phrase: taco (in this context)
Like in the following sentences:

Soltó un taco. El taco era una barbaridad, casi blasfemo. Pero el taco también era ingenioso, por lo que no chocaba tanto.
Ramon Somoza
Spain
Local time: 06:25
curse word, expletive
Explanation:
una palabrota. Me gusta más expletive en este contexto, porque se puede referir tanto a una palabra como a una frase.
Selected response from:

Alberto Montpellier
Cuba
Grading comment
Thanks to all that responded!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6curse word, expletive
Alberto Montpellier
4 +2He/she swore // (He/she let out) an obscenity
Charles Davis
5Cuss word / swear word / bad word
Seth Phillips
4 +1He/she blurted out an expletive.Robert Forstag
3rude comment
Lisa McCarthy


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
curse word, expletive


Explanation:
una palabrota. Me gusta más expletive en este contexto, porque se puede referir tanto a una palabra como a una frase.

Alberto Montpellier
Cuba
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks to all that responded!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carol Gullidge: 'expletive' is fine, but we don't say 'curse word' (it would be 'swear word'!)
7 mins
  -> thanks, you're right.

agree  Cinnamon Nolan: Expletive
11 mins

agree  Marianne Pickles
19 mins

agree  Jenni Lukac
1 hr

agree  philgoddard: In my experience, curse word is US but not UK.
2 hrs

agree  James A. Walsh
4 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Soltó un taco.
He/she blurted out an expletive.


Explanation:
Or: "spewed" instead of "blurted."

Here "taco" means "swear word" or "expletive."

See: www.spanishdict.com/translate/taco

Robert Forstag
United States
Local time: 00:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  eski: Correct; I second the use of 'expletive'. Saludos, Robert. :)
43 mins
  -> Thank you, Eski.
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Cuss word / swear word / bad word


Explanation:
In Spain, "Soltar tacos" means to cuss / swear.

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Note added at 13 mins (2013-11-20 16:27:41 GMT)
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See think link:
http://www.wordmagicsoft.com/dictionary/es-en/soltar tacos.p...

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Note added at 13 mins (2013-11-20 16:28:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

this***

Seth Phillips
Mexico
Local time: 23:25
Native speaker of: English
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
rude comment


Explanation:
Taco = rude word / swearword.

"He/she made a rude comment. It was barbaric, verging on blasphemous. "

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Note added at 14 minutos (2013-11-20 16:28:27 GMT)
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Another idea:

"HE/SHE MADE AN OBSCENE REMARK / COMMENT"

Rupert Everett's obscene gaffe on live TV | Showbiz | News | Daily ...
www.express.co.uk › News › Showbiz‎
Sep 19, 2012 - ... and HOLLY WILLOUGHBY squirming with embarrassment on Wednesday (19Sep12) when he made an obscene comment live on air.


Lisa McCarthy
Spain
Local time: 06:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
He/she swore // (He/she let out) an obscenity


Explanation:
I recommend just using the verb. I would do it like this:

She swore. The expression she used was outrageous, almost blasphemous. But it was also ingenious, which made it less shocking.

Obviously it could be "he" instead of "she"; you will know from the context which it is.

This "taco" must have been a phrase. A single word can hardly have been "ingenioso", but a combination of two or more words could be. "Taco" or "palabrota" can be phrases, but the most common English equivalents are "swear word" (British) or "curse word" (American), which refer to single words and are therefore unsuitable here.

An expletive can be a phrase, but to me it's a pretty formal word, almost legalistic, and stylistically unsuitable. (It always makes me think of "expletive deleted" in the transcript of the famous Nixon White House tapes.).

"An obscenity" could be used, and in fact if you want to do this with a noun that would be my recommendation. You could say "She let out an obscenity". But in fact I don't think that it's a good idea to emulate the repetition of "taco" in English at all. It works in the Spanish original but in English it would be clumsy.

The normal way of saying "soltar un taco", in isolation, is simply "to swear". This is the standard verb in British English, and it's in Merriam-Webster with this meaning, so I presume it's understood in America. But I think "to curse" is more usual in American English. "Curse word" is used in American English, but not in British English, where the equivalent is "swear word".

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Note added at 2 hrs (2013-11-20 18:47:22 GMT)
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It's a matter of style. "Soltó un taco" is brief, abrupt. Anything along the lines of "he let out an expletive" loses that punchy rhythm, and with it the force of the original. And honestly, who uses "expletive" in everyday speech? I don't know if people do in the US, but it really seems formal to my British ear.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 06:25
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 59

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robert Forstag: Your reasoning about the colloquial awkwardness of "expletive" is irrefutable, and the two suggestions you offer sound like what might actually come out of someone's mouth.
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Robert!

agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Claudia! Saludos :)
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