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porcino extensivo e intensivo

English translation: large scale, intensive hog production/pig farming

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:porcino extensivo e intensivo
English translation:large scale, intensive hog production/pig farming
Entered by: John Speese
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21:47 Feb 3, 2009
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Livestock / Animal Husbandry
Spanish term or phrase: porcino extensivo e intensivo
I have ¨widescale pig farming¨ but don´t believe this is exactly correct.
David Jessop
Spain
large scale, intensive hog production/pig farming
Explanation:
These and other similar terms generate numerous google hits.
Selected response from:

John Speese
United States
Local time: 00:11
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4extensive and intensive hog farmingGLENN MCBRIDE WITHENSHAW
5 +3large scale, intensive hog production/pig farmingJohn Speese
Summary of reference entries provided
Kathryn Litherland
re: extensive
Rachel Fell
an experience from WalesBubo Coromandus

Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
large scale, intensive hog production/pig farming


Explanation:
These and other similar terms generate numerous google hits.


    Reference: http://www.ehponline.org/members/2000/108p233-238wing/wing2-...
    Reference: http://cct78.org/HELP.htm
John Speese
United States
Local time: 00:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Muriel Vasconcellos: "Pig farming" 333,000 hits; "hog production" 86,000 hits; "hog farming: 32,900 hits
11 mins

agree  Rachel Fell: agree with "intensive" but not "large-scale" here; pig farming (not "hog") is used in the UK, as far as I know
58 mins

neutral  Kathryn Litherland: The problem is that in an agricultural context, "large scale" and "extensive" do not mean the same thing--indeed, extensive methods are often smaller scale because they do allow large numbers of animals on a given area of exploitation.
1 hr

agree  neilmac: Pig or swine more common in Europe than hog. Extensive is the proper term in Spain.
11 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
extensive and intensive hog farming


Explanation:
I use hog farming

GLENN MCBRIDE WITHENSHAW
Mexico
Local time: 23:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Muriel Vasconcellos: "Hog farming" 10% as common as "pig farming" (32,900 vs. 333,000 Google hits
10 mins

agree  Kathryn Litherland: google be damned--I'd use "hog farming" in a technical setting (may be a dialect difference)?
38 mins
  -> I grew up on a farm in Ohio and I always heard hog farming, I tried to find a reference, but couldn't, but I think that pig farming is a much smaller scale.

agree  liz askew: pig farming.
10 hrs

agree  neilmac: More commonly known as pig or swine farming in Europe.
11 hrs

agree  Rachel Fell
11 hrs
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Reference comments


56 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference

Reference information:
http://crueize.com/doc/PigTales_AndTails.htm

I thought I'd share this link for the surprising discovery that free-range pigs will eat stray dogs (and not the other way around!):


"So far, for about six months in the year, when there are sufficient chestnuts and acorns, this feeding is symbolic and intended only to keep in touch. The rest of the time they draw their health and happiness from roots, insects, earth, grass and leaves, and the occasional fox or, since this is a hunting area, stray dog."

Kathryn Litherland
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  neilmac: Apparently so will S Palin's advisers! (Guardian, today)
10 hrs
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1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: re: extensive

Reference information:
If they're lucky, the animals may get a chain or a plastic football to play with. But since there is rarely enough light to see by (pigs are quieter in the dark), fighting and biting are more common than playing. To minimise the effects of this, the vast majority of piglets' tails are routinely docked soon after birth, and their teeth clipped, again in breach of EU rules.

Routine tail-docking in particular, Brooke and Baaij both argue, is a good general indication of pig welfare: pigs reared on extensive farms, outdoors, with plenty of scope for foraging and rooting, rarely need their tails docked. "If they've got plenty to do, they're happy," says Baaij. Otherwise, basically, they go for each other, with tails and ears the favoured targets. And once a pen full of pigs gets the scent of blood, the consequences can be catastrophic; pigs are, after all, omnivores.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2009/jan/06/animal-welfare-food...

http://www.rspca.org.au/campaign/pigfarmissues.asp

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Carmen Schultz: good info.
10 hrs
  -> Thank you Carmen:-)
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8 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: an experience from Wales

Reference information:
I used to live on an upland farm in Wales. There are a number of environmental grant schemes for these farms, and they all require extensive farming, which means that the stocking of the farm with animals (sheep, cows) must not exceed a maximum number of LU's (livestock units) per hectare. This prevents overgrazing and assists the recovery of hay meadows and other pastures so that they support a diversity of native species.

I think the terms "extensive" and "intensive" farming are correct (please see Wikipedia definition of "extensive farming" below). As for "porcino", our neighbour had a pig farm and "pig" was the term we used rather than "hog" -- applying to Wales, that is.


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extensive_farming
Bubo Coromandus
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  neilmac: In UK, hog is used more in idioms like "go the whole hog" "road hog" etc.
2 hrs
  -> yes indeed Neil, your examples make me laugh! Thanks :-) Deb
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Changes made by editors
Feb 8, 2009 - Changes made by John Speese:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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