ss. I a. C. - I d. C.

English translation: 1st century BC–1st century AD / 1st century BCE–1st century CE

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:ss. I a. C. - I d. C.
English translation:1st century BC–1st century AD / 1st century BCE–1st century CE
Entered by: Charles Davis
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04:45 Dec 2, 2016
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Mechanics / Mech Engineering
Spanish term or phrase: ss. I a. C. - I d. C.
I am translating an article about latin.
xujie
China
1st century BCE–1st century CE / 1st century BC–1st century AD
Explanation:
Everything here indicates that this refers to a span of dates, and these dates would fit an article about Latin. The abbreviation "ss." stands (among other things) for "siglos", which means centuries, "a. C" and "d. C.", with that combination of lower and upper case, can only be "antes de Cristo" (before Christ) and "después de Cristo" (literally after Christ), and centuries are normally indicated with roman numerals in Spanish, as here ("I").

In academic prose, the ordinal numbers of centuries should be given in words (i.e., "seventeenth century", not "17th century"), but since this clearly occurs in a reference rather than in continuous prose, it would be fine to use "1st" rather than "first", and preferable because shorter, unless the editors decide otherwise. See the Oxford reference below.

You can use the traditional BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini) in English (nearly always used without full stops nowadays), or the more modern "BCE" (Before Common Era or Before Christian Era) and "CE" (Common Era or Christian Era), which are widely preferred nowadays for cultural reasons. Again, the editors will decide, but I would use the latter.

If you use AD, it comes after a century, though it precedes a year ("the year AD 100" but "the first century AD").

http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735...

http://courses.wcupa.edu/jones/his101/misc/dates.htm

Finally the hyphen commonly used in Spanish for a span should be a short dash (EN dash) in academic English, without spaces.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 09:05
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +21st century BCE–1st century CE / 1st century BC–1st century AD
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
1st century BCE–1st century CE / 1st century BC–1st century AD


Explanation:
Everything here indicates that this refers to a span of dates, and these dates would fit an article about Latin. The abbreviation "ss." stands (among other things) for "siglos", which means centuries, "a. C" and "d. C.", with that combination of lower and upper case, can only be "antes de Cristo" (before Christ) and "después de Cristo" (literally after Christ), and centuries are normally indicated with roman numerals in Spanish, as here ("I").

In academic prose, the ordinal numbers of centuries should be given in words (i.e., "seventeenth century", not "17th century"), but since this clearly occurs in a reference rather than in continuous prose, it would be fine to use "1st" rather than "first", and preferable because shorter, unless the editors decide otherwise. See the Oxford reference below.

You can use the traditional BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini) in English (nearly always used without full stops nowadays), or the more modern "BCE" (Before Common Era or Before Christian Era) and "CE" (Common Era or Christian Era), which are widely preferred nowadays for cultural reasons. Again, the editors will decide, but I would use the latter.

If you use AD, it comes after a century, though it precedes a year ("the year AD 100" but "the first century AD").

http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780191735...

http://courses.wcupa.edu/jones/his101/misc/dates.htm

Finally the hyphen commonly used in Spanish for a span should be a short dash (EN dash) in academic English, without spaces.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 09:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robert Carter: Thanks for all that clarification, Charles. I think I'd be left scratching my head if faced with the abbreviations "BCE" and "CE", I'm afraid, but I'm probably showing my age :-)
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, Robert! I've only become aware of them in the last 15 years or so. They're still largely unknown outside professional academic circles, I'd say.

agree  lorenab23: I thought it had something to do with dates but wasn't sure, now you have left no doubt, thank you for such brilliant explanation!
15 hrs
  -> Your instincts were sound, as always! Thanks, Lorena, and saludos ;)
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