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English translation: evidence set; clinician;

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11:53 Sep 25, 2000
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical
Spanish term or phrase: usage doubts
Correct usage of
1.evidence/evidences: in a sci. context, is it possible to say 'set of evidences'?
2.clinician/consultant: when referring to a hospital expert (un clinico), which is correct?
3.'hypoapneic' but not 'hypoapnoeic' whereas 'apneic' and 'apnoeic': can anyone explain why 'hypoapnoeic' is not possible, or confirm that this is in fact the case?
amjm
English translation:evidence set; clinician;
Explanation:
1. Looking on Google for *set of evidences* vs *evidence set*, I get 31 hits for the first, 1,400+ for the second. And *evidence set*, as an English noun phrase, would apply to one *or more* items in the set.

2. The Oxford SuperLex has the following for *clínico*:
clínico2 -ca m, f (RPl) general practitioner

And Termium proposes:
English:Medical Staff
clinician s CORRECT,NOUN
DEF - A physician with expertise in clinical practice as
distinguished from one specializing in research. s
1990-12-11

3. My "guess" is that you could use either spelling--the one is "more" Greek than the other. Termium has never heard of *hypoapneic*, and knows *apneic*, but not *apnoeic* It does know both *apnea* and *apnoea*, but makes the following distinction:

English:Functional Respiratory Disorders Symptoms (Medicine)
apnea s CORRECT,SEE RECORD,USA
apnoea s CORRECT,GR. B

If you are translating for a British readership, go with the "more Greek" version. ;-))

And I just ran a quick web search. Google gets all of three hits for *hypoapneic*, none for *hypoapnoeic*. Alta Vista doesn't come up with either one. Ixquick comes up with just one, for *hypoapneic*. Northern Lights gets two for *hypoapneic*, nothing for the 2nd. Hot Bot gets 2 for the first, none for the 1nd, etc...

Conclusion: this word is very little used; you should be able to use either one, depending on which side of the Big Puddle you are aiming for.
Selected response from:

Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 17:15
Grading comment
I made the same searches, but still doubted. Ta for 'clinician' confirmation.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naWhy hypoapneic is incorrect
Barbara Thomas
naWhy hypoapneic is incorrect
Barbara Thomas
naevidence set; clinician;
Yolanda Broad


  

Answers


36 mins
evidence set; clinician;


Explanation:
1. Looking on Google for *set of evidences* vs *evidence set*, I get 31 hits for the first, 1,400+ for the second. And *evidence set*, as an English noun phrase, would apply to one *or more* items in the set.

2. The Oxford SuperLex has the following for *clínico*:
clínico2 -ca m, f (RPl) general practitioner

And Termium proposes:
English:Medical Staff
clinician s CORRECT,NOUN
DEF - A physician with expertise in clinical practice as
distinguished from one specializing in research. s
1990-12-11

3. My "guess" is that you could use either spelling--the one is "more" Greek than the other. Termium has never heard of *hypoapneic*, and knows *apneic*, but not *apnoeic* It does know both *apnea* and *apnoea*, but makes the following distinction:

English:Functional Respiratory Disorders Symptoms (Medicine)
apnea s CORRECT,SEE RECORD,USA
apnoea s CORRECT,GR. B

If you are translating for a British readership, go with the "more Greek" version. ;-))

And I just ran a quick web search. Google gets all of three hits for *hypoapneic*, none for *hypoapnoeic*. Alta Vista doesn't come up with either one. Ixquick comes up with just one, for *hypoapneic*. Northern Lights gets two for *hypoapneic*, nothing for the 2nd. Hot Bot gets 2 for the first, none for the 1nd, etc...

Conclusion: this word is very little used; you should be able to use either one, depending on which side of the Big Puddle you are aiming for.



    Reference: http://www.termium.com
Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 17:15
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 668
Grading comment
I made the same searches, but still doubted. Ta for 'clinician' confirmation.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 20 hrs
Why hypoapneic is incorrect


Explanation:
Apnea means "cessation of breathing". The prefix "hypo-" means beneath, under, or deficient. The combination "hypo-apneic" produces the implausible deficient cessation of breathing. Your author probably meant to write "hypopneic" as in "hypopnea", which is an abnormal decrease ub the depth and rate of the respiratory movements.


    Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary
Barbara Thomas
United States
Local time: 17:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 309
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 20 hrs
Why hypoapneic is incorrect


Explanation:
Apnea means "cessation of breathing". The prefix "hypo-" means beneath, under, or deficient. The combination "hypo-apneic" produces the implausible deficient cessation of breathing. Your author probably meant to write "hypopneic" as in "hypopnea", which is an abnormal decrease ub the depth and rate of the respiratory movements.


    Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary
Barbara Thomas
United States
Local time: 17:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 309
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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