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cortedad de la musculatura isquiosural

English translation: tightness of hamstring muscles

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:cortedad de la musculatura isquiosural
English translation:tightness of hamstring muscles
Entered by: Nikki Graham
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23:08 Jan 19, 2004
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical
Spanish term or phrase: cortedad de la musculatura isquiosural
La cortedad de la musculatura isquiosural es la patología del aparato locomotor
más susceptibles de ser abordadas de forma preventiva por la Educación Física debido a su elevada prevalencia y porque su tratamiento está basado en la realización de estiramientos y corrección postural.

Thanks in Advance.
Nikki Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:29
Tightness of hamstring muscles
Explanation:
This is certainly a difficult one. I'm not 100% certain, but after a good deal of research this seems like a possibility.

Stedman's defines the prefix ischio- as "the combining form related to the ischium". The ischium refers to our "sit bones" at the base of our pelvis. The word sural "relates to the calf of the leg" (Stedman's).

Now, while the word "ischiosural" does not seem to exist in English, other forms of ischio- words may help us. For example, Stedman's defines "ischiofemoral" as "relating to the ischium, or hip bone, and femur, or thigh bone." "Ischiofibular" is "relating to or connecting the ischium and the fibula".

In some sense, them, our word must mean related to (or possibly connecting) the ischium and the calf.

Mosby's defines the hamstring as "any one of three muscles at the back of the thigh"* The hamstring is a broad term, then, that includes these 3 muscles: the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus.

After reading the context of the article from which your phrase is excerpted, as well as some other sites that talk about the same phenomenon, I believe this is what it refers to.

Hope this is of at least some help, Nikki.

Paul






**---------------------------------------------------------
Excerpted from Mosby's Medical Encyclopedia
Copyright (c) 1994-5, 1996, 1997 The Learning Company Inc. All Rights Reserved
Selected response from:

Paul Weideman
Local time: 01:29
Grading comment
Thank you all for your input. I needed conformation that this was actually talking about hamstrings and I decided to use tightness.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2excessive tension of the hamstring musclesxxxElena Sgarbo
4 +1Tightness of hamstring musclesPaul Weideman
5terseness of the ischiatic musclesrhandler


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
terseness of the ischiatic muscles


Explanation:
The ischiatic muscles are so defined by Webster's:

ischium (iske em) pl. -chia (-e)
n.
the lowermost of the three sections of the innominate bone; bone on which the body rests when sitting
ischial, ischiadic, or ischiatic
adj.

Etymology
[L < Gr ischion, hip, hip joint]

Two examples:

The JI -- Gerdts et al. 168 (4): 1877
... Ontario, Canada) was injected im by palpating the hindleg of the fetus and inserting a 23-gauge needle through the uterine wall and into the ischiatic muscles. ...
www.jimmunol.org/cgi/content/full/168/4/1877

Heroes Community - Freedom of Thought...
... I feel sorry for anybody that fell down to cheap irony, threats, offenses
and licking ischiatic muscles (they know who they are!). ...
heroescommunity.com/viewthread.php3?FID=3&TID=4563


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-01-19 23:37:14 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry: the Webster\'s definition is not for the muscles, but for the bone they are associated with (ischium).


    Webster's Electronic Dictionary
rhandler
Local time: 05:29
Native speaker of: Portuguese
PRO pts in pair: 1170
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Tightness of hamstring muscles


Explanation:
This is certainly a difficult one. I'm not 100% certain, but after a good deal of research this seems like a possibility.

Stedman's defines the prefix ischio- as "the combining form related to the ischium". The ischium refers to our "sit bones" at the base of our pelvis. The word sural "relates to the calf of the leg" (Stedman's).

Now, while the word "ischiosural" does not seem to exist in English, other forms of ischio- words may help us. For example, Stedman's defines "ischiofemoral" as "relating to the ischium, or hip bone, and femur, or thigh bone." "Ischiofibular" is "relating to or connecting the ischium and the fibula".

In some sense, them, our word must mean related to (or possibly connecting) the ischium and the calf.

Mosby's defines the hamstring as "any one of three muscles at the back of the thigh"* The hamstring is a broad term, then, that includes these 3 muscles: the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus.

After reading the context of the article from which your phrase is excerpted, as well as some other sites that talk about the same phenomenon, I believe this is what it refers to.

Hope this is of at least some help, Nikki.

Paul






**---------------------------------------------------------
Excerpted from Mosby's Medical Encyclopedia
Copyright (c) 1994-5, 1996, 1997 The Learning Company Inc. All Rights Reserved


    Stedman's Med. Dic., Mosby's Med. Dic.
Paul Weideman
Local time: 01:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 118
Grading comment
Thank you all for your input. I needed conformation that this was actually talking about hamstrings and I decided to use tightness.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Susana Galilea
46 mins
  -> gracias, susana
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
excessive tension of the hamstring muscles


Explanation:
Hola Nikki

"La cortedad" de los músculos no es una expresión habitual; supongo que se refiere a exceso de tensión.

Los músculos isquiosurales son los 3 que están en el plano profundo de la parte posterior del muslo (hamstring muscles), cuya inserción proximal es en el isquion.

Suerte :-)
Elena


The Posterior Femoral Muscles (Hamstring Muscles):

Biceps femoris.
Semitendinosus.
Semimembranosus.

The Biceps femoris (Biceps) is situated on the posterior and lateral aspect of the thigh. It has two heads of origin; one, the long head, arises from the lower and inner impression on the back part of the tuberosity of the **ischium**, by a tendon common to it and the Semitendinosus, and from....

The Semitendinosus, remarkable for the great length of its tendon of insertion, is situated at the posterior and medial aspect of the thigh. It arises from the lower and medial impression on the tuberosity of the **ischium**, by a tendon common to it and the long head of the Biceps femoris...

The Semimembranosus, so called from its membranous tendon of origin, is situated at the back and medial side of the thigh. It arises by a thick tendon from the upper and outer impression on the tuberosity of the **ischium**, above and lateral to the Biceps femoris and Semitendinosus....



    Reference: http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/reference/gray/128.html#i434
xxxElena Sgarbo
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3539

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Susana Galilea
36 mins
  -> Gracias Susana :-)

agree  Muriel Vasconcellos
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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