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madrina de guerra

English translation: war godmother

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:madrina de guerra
English translation:war godmother
Entered by: Swatchka
Options:
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17:03 Mar 4, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Military / Defense / person
Spanish term or phrase: madrina de guerra
In the Spanish Civil War, a fascist soldier's "madrina de guerra" sends him sausages, etc, to the front. The context makes relatively clear what the madrinas are - they write to soldiers, animarlos, etc, but I have no idea what to call it in English. Seems almost like a penpal/patron, but I need a good 1930s term. Unfortunately, I keep thinking "correspondent", which obviously has the wrong connotations. Any ideas? Thanks!
ldillma
United States
Local time: 14:53
war godmother
Explanation:
Present day ones tend the grave of fallen soldiers but they seem to have done what you described during world war I and II. This is from an Orbituary:
She was born in Nancy, France, in 1902. During World War I, her family became refugees, retreating from Lorraine to Paris. The Red Cross gave them clothing donated by Californians.

Sewn into her dress was a note saying, "If you would like to have a godmother in San Francisco write to me." She wrote and was given a "war godmother" from a prominent California family. After many letters and photographs were exchanged, she decided to come to the United States, say family members.
http://www.almanacnews.com/morgue/2001/2001_06_20.obit20.htm...
Selected response from:

Swatchka
Spain
Local time: 20:53
Grading comment
Thank you! Somehow it sounds natural to me in Spanish and terrible in English, but indeed, it seems to be used in the same way. Much obliged.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3war godmotherSwatchka
4volunteer "godmothers"/patrons
patricia scott


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
war godmother


Explanation:
Present day ones tend the grave of fallen soldiers but they seem to have done what you described during world war I and II. This is from an Orbituary:
She was born in Nancy, France, in 1902. During World War I, her family became refugees, retreating from Lorraine to Paris. The Red Cross gave them clothing donated by Californians.

Sewn into her dress was a note saying, "If you would like to have a godmother in San Francisco write to me." She wrote and was given a "war godmother" from a prominent California family. After many letters and photographs were exchanged, she decided to come to the United States, say family members.
http://www.almanacnews.com/morgue/2001/2001_06_20.obit20.htm...


Swatchka
Spain
Local time: 20:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
Thank you! Somehow it sounds natural to me in Spanish and terrible in English, but indeed, it seems to be used in the same way. Much obliged.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  patricia scott: I hadn't seen your answer when I wrote mine, Swatchka. I didn't know they were around in other wars either. Interesting.
2 mins
  -> Thanks Patricia

agree  Lydia De Jorge
22 mins
  -> Thank you Lydia

agree  Valeria Carcagno
5 hrs
  -> Thank you Valeria
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
volunteer "godmothers"/patrons


Explanation:
Your option "patrons" is closer, I think, Since they were actually more than pen-pals, sending food and parcels aside from letters to cheer up the soldiers - I am not aware that this figure exists outside the Spanish Civil War. Maybe someone knows if they existed elsewhere.

patricia scott
Spain
Local time: 20:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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