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08:24 Aug 27, 2000
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: biscocho
Could someone tell me what this is supposed to mean please?
Belinda
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Summary of answers provided
5BizcochoNicodemo
na +1See belowAlvin Adams, Jr
naangelfood cakeRivera
naBIZCOCHObea0
nasponge cake
Sarah Brenchley
naIt is BIZCOCHO (with z)Leonardo Lamarche
naBischocho should be spelled bizcochodynasty
nabiscochoCarolina Ramirez
Summary of reference entries provided
vulgar? no, not so muchde veras

  

Answers


6 mins
biscocho


Explanation:
As found on www.cheche.com

"Biscocho - these biscuits, invented in the 1940's by a local baker, have made Pasuquin town a must stop when in Ilocos Norte. They have a distinct slightly sweet flavor that has hooked natives and tourists alike. We learned that the biscocho is a balikbayan favorite and has in fact already been brought to Japan, Europe and the US as pasalubong. The biscochos come in two varieties, hard (like mamon tostado) and soft (think Spanish bread minus the filling)."

Also see links below for more info.


    Reference: http://www.waterfrontdr.com/rmenu.html
    Reference: http://www.rhodesjewishmuseum.org/recipes.htm
Carolina Ramirez
Canada
Local time: 17:14
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 42

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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8 mins
It is BIZCOCHO (with z)


Explanation:
Means cake, biscuit, pastry. Mor often cake. Hope it helps.

Leonardo Lamarche
Local time: 18:14
PRO pts in pair: 124

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Heathcliff
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1 hr
Bischocho should be spelled bizcocho


Explanation:
Bizcocho is what they call a cake in Puerto Rico and in Santo Domingo.


    Multicultural Spanish Dictionary
    (being a native of Puerto Rico also help with the definition)
dynasty

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Heathcliff
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3 hrs
sponge cake


Explanation:
It can also mean sponge finger.

Sarah Brenchley
Local time: 23:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 104

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Heathcliff
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7 hrs
BIZCOCHO


Explanation:
In Argentina, "bizcochos" are biscuits. A cake is called "bizcochuelo".

Anyway, I would suggest you to provide more context, since other colloquial meanings may be possible.

Good Luck!

bea0
United States
Local time: 17:14
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 65

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Heathcliff
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10 hrs
angelfood cake


Explanation:
IF the text is South American Spanish, a "biscocho" is a cake, angelfood type

Rivera

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Heathcliff
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1 day 6 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
See below


Explanation:
Yes, it is a sponge cake, but in parts of Mexico and the southwest U.S.A., it is a vulgar term for the female sexual organs. If you heard it in Califirnia, the speaker proably didn't know it had another meaning. The website below will probably tell you more than you want to know about it. Also, in Lunfardo, a dialect used in Buenos Aires, it means "bizco" or crosseyed, but it is unlikely that this is meaning of what you heard. You were very probably insulted.

AA


    Reference: http://home.earthlink.net/~rudysalazar/Calo.htm
Alvin Adams, Jr
Local time: 16:14
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 222

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  de veras
3035 days

neutral  Nicodemo: Yea I've heard bizcocho used in a vulgar way,but that is simply vulgar slang for some. Just like the Spanish word "verga" which for some might be a vulgar term for the male organ, but in accuality "verga" really means the front end of the hull of a ship.
3049 days
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3050 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Bizcocho


Explanation:
Many people here are giving confusing answers to the question. It's quite simple a "Bizcocho"( Spanish) "Biscotto"(Italian) from the latin (bis-coctus)
Simply means cookie or a pastry in Spanish. North Americans (US) are probably more familar with the Italian version of "Biscotto" thanks to the large influence of Italian Americans here over the past 100 years. In South America It was introduced by the Spanish to the new world, as is know as "Bizcochos". Now a days in latin America many different styles and flavors from many different Latin American countries have evolved.

Nicodemo
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Reference comments


3036 days
Reference: vulgar? no, not so much

Reference information:
ok everybody, let me say that i have lived in mexico and there are plenty of vulgar terms we use everyday besides something like "bizcocho". sponge cake, biscuit, call it what you will, we always used this term to decribe "hot" or "sexy" NOT genitalia! the term works for both men and women. hell i use it all the time and i'm a women! for example: "que bizcocho eres" i really have no clue what AA is referring to when making that statement about vulgar. maybe i am just from the city and not some pueblo but i will say this much...forget about what anyone knows or speaks in the southwest U.S. it tends to be garbage, ghetto, spanglish. hence the reason why the actual people of mexico do not consider them to be mexicans but "chicanos". bizcocho is NOT a bad word and by no means vulgar and offensive, it's just the equivalent of saying "biscuit" (which i'll also bust out in english when appropriate). don't sweat, if you are accused of being bizcocho it's probably a good thing and i'm sure no reference was being made to a sponge cake or your genitalia. lighten up folks, gimme a break! maybe don't say it in front of your boy/girl friends abuelita during pozole but come on man. cheers, "la chilanga"!

de veras
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