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moneda contrasellada

English translation: counterstamped coin

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:moneda contrasellada
English translation:counterstamped coin
Entered by: billy_budd
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19:19 Jan 3, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
/ Numismatics
Spanish term or phrase: moneda contrasellada
A coin that has been restamped with the coat of arms of a country different from the issuing one.
billy_budd
Local time: 10:07
(overstruck, countermarked, counterstamped) coin
Explanation:
Overstruck or countermarked coins may be restruck for other purposes than changing the country. From the references, it seems that "counterstamped" is the correct term. Try a google search on all these terms.

From the 1st reference below:
"An overstrike occurs when an existing coin is used as the planchet for a new coin without completely removing the features of the older coin. Thus, it is sometimes possible to identify the older coin because its features can be detected beneath the design of the newer coin.

A countermark is a device impressed into the surface of an existing coin, usually in the form of a small portrait of the ruler. A countermark was applied by an official or ruler to confirm that the countermarked coin can pass in trade as legal tender. The countermark is usually positioned carefully to avoid obscuring the portrait on the original coin, apparently to ensure retaining the identification of the original issue, and possibly as a sign of deference by a sub-king or client state."

Also, see: http://www.geocities.com/athens/acropolis/6193/feac2.html

Counterstamped: "No French coins were ever minted exclusively for circulation in French Canada (called Nouvelle France, that is, New France) or Louisiana. However, some issues were designated for general circulation in the French New World possessions, including Canada and possessions in the Caribbean. The first New World colonial issues were "recycled" old douzain coins, that is coins of 12 deniers or one sol. These hammered coins were composed of billon (an alloy of silver and copper) and consisted of both regal issues and regional coinage issued by local ecclesiastical or feudal lords. According to an edict of June,1640, these older worn coins were authorized to be counterstamped with a punch displaying a fleur-de-lys within a beaded oval. Often when the coins were counterstamped the force of the impact bowed the coins so that they are often somewhat concave on the counterstamped side and convex of the other side. Once the coins were counterstamped they were sent to the colonies."


Selected response from:

GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 09:07
Grading comment
One of the most complete and documented answers I've ever got. Will keep "counterstamped", because of its greater similarity with "contrasellada". Thank you very much indeed.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4(overstruck, countermarked, counterstamped) coin
GoodWords
4restamped coinMarcus Malabad
4restamped coin
2 +1counterstamped coin
Robert INGLEDEW


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
counterstamped coin


Explanation:
I am just guessing.

Robert INGLEDEW
Argentina
Local time: 12:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 1940

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marcus Malabad: this is it! see: localsonly.wilmington.net/mwallace/exonumia/drggw.html
1 min
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
restamped coin


Explanation:
I think you had the answer already.




    Reference: http://www.mintmark.com/csahalf.htm
    Reference: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/ht/05/wae/ht05wae.htm

Native speaker of:

8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
restamped coin


Explanation:
I think you had the answer already.




    Reference: http://www.mintmark.com/csahalf.htm
    Reference: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/ht/05/wae/ht05wae.htm
Marcus Malabad
Canada
Local time: 16:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TagalogTagalog
PRO pts in pair: 458
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(overstruck, countermarked, counterstamped) coin


Explanation:
Overstruck or countermarked coins may be restruck for other purposes than changing the country. From the references, it seems that "counterstamped" is the correct term. Try a google search on all these terms.

From the 1st reference below:
"An overstrike occurs when an existing coin is used as the planchet for a new coin without completely removing the features of the older coin. Thus, it is sometimes possible to identify the older coin because its features can be detected beneath the design of the newer coin.

A countermark is a device impressed into the surface of an existing coin, usually in the form of a small portrait of the ruler. A countermark was applied by an official or ruler to confirm that the countermarked coin can pass in trade as legal tender. The countermark is usually positioned carefully to avoid obscuring the portrait on the original coin, apparently to ensure retaining the identification of the original issue, and possibly as a sign of deference by a sub-king or client state."

Also, see: http://www.geocities.com/athens/acropolis/6193/feac2.html

Counterstamped: "No French coins were ever minted exclusively for circulation in French Canada (called Nouvelle France, that is, New France) or Louisiana. However, some issues were designated for general circulation in the French New World possessions, including Canada and possessions in the Caribbean. The first New World colonial issues were "recycled" old douzain coins, that is coins of 12 deniers or one sol. These hammered coins were composed of billon (an alloy of silver and copper) and consisted of both regal issues and regional coinage issued by local ecclesiastical or feudal lords. According to an edict of June,1640, these older worn coins were authorized to be counterstamped with a punch displaying a fleur-de-lys within a beaded oval. Often when the coins were counterstamped the force of the impact bowed the coins so that they are often somewhat concave on the counterstamped side and convex of the other side. Once the coins were counterstamped they were sent to the colonies."





    Reference: http://www.parthia.com/parthia_overstrikes.htm
    Reference: http://www.coins.nd.edu/ColCoin/ColCoinIntros/French.intro.h...
GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 09:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1449
Grading comment
One of the most complete and documented answers I've ever got. Will keep "counterstamped", because of its greater similarity with "contrasellada". Thank you very much indeed.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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