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El LIC

English translation: (see below)

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14:35 Jul 2, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Other / other
Spanish term or phrase: El LIC
El Lic. Benjamin Castillo Diaz, Director del Archivio General, con fundamento en el articolo 6 de la ley.....

What does "LIC" stands for? Is it "licenziato"?
Andreea Bostan
United Kingdom
English translation:(see below)
Explanation:
The others are sending you in the wrong direction.

Check http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1509516

Si se tiene la seguridad de que se trata de un abogado porque así señala el documento o por su función siendo juez, defensor, agente del ministerio público, notario, jefe de un depto. jurídico, etc.) se usa el título "Attorney (Atty.)" después del nombre.

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/791814

Si no se sabe si es abogado o no, entonces también puede ser "Bachelors Degree" pero si uno ignora los detalles al respecto, todos los equivalentes en inglés son específicos. Por lo general uso una nota del traductor:

T.N. - "Licenciado", academic title used by lawyers and persons with bachelor level college degrees in many fields.

Es lo único que se puede hacer.

En la práctica es lo que acostumbro hacer.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2006-08-21 23:52:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Either "Atty." if that is known, or the Note if not known.

In some documents that are addressed to people from the USA who are directly involved in binational relations, they are expected to be aware of the Mexican penchant for titles. In such cases I just leave in the titles: "Lic.", "Ing.", etc. as is with no note.
Selected response from:

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 11:03
Grading comment
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1(see below)
Henry Hinds
4 +1leave it out if possible
Noni Gilbert
3Esq.
Martin Boyd


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
leave it out if possible


Explanation:
Lic = licenciado = graduate in higher degree, ie more than three-year course if it's Spain. Stimes BA/BSc will do, but not here I fear.

Strange mix of Italian and Spanish going on here. In some countries, eg Mexico, Italy, Lic. is used as an honorific, just like Dr., but in UK the usage doesn't exist. He's a university graduate, qualified at sth which is not specified here! We need more context if there is any

Noni Gilbert
Spain
Local time: 19:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cinnamon Nolan
25 mins
  -> Thanks Cinn!

agree  claudia bagnardi
31 mins
  -> Thanks Claudia.

disagree  Henry Hinds: Not a good recommendation, I'm afraid.
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Esq.


Explanation:
It is a common convention in translations of this kind to use the English term of respect "Esq." (Esquire) as an equivalent for the Spanish Licenciado, although the two do not really carry the same meaning. As it is a term often used for lawyers in the U.S., it is often an acceptable solution, if you prefer not to omit it altogether as suggested above.

Example sentence(s):
  • Benjamin Castillo Diaz Esq.

    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esquire
Martin Boyd
Canada
Local time: 13:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Salloz
1 hr

disagree  Henry Hinds: Not so good either.
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(see below)


Explanation:
The others are sending you in the wrong direction.

Check http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1509516

Si se tiene la seguridad de que se trata de un abogado porque así señala el documento o por su función siendo juez, defensor, agente del ministerio público, notario, jefe de un depto. jurídico, etc.) se usa el título "Attorney (Atty.)" después del nombre.

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/791814

Si no se sabe si es abogado o no, entonces también puede ser "Bachelors Degree" pero si uno ignora los detalles al respecto, todos los equivalentes en inglés son específicos. Por lo general uso una nota del traductor:

T.N. - "Licenciado", academic title used by lawyers and persons with bachelor level college degrees in many fields.

Es lo único que se puede hacer.

En la práctica es lo que acostumbro hacer.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2006-08-21 23:52:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Either "Atty." if that is known, or the Note if not known.

In some documents that are addressed to people from the USA who are directly involved in binational relations, they are expected to be aware of the Mexican penchant for titles. In such cases I just leave in the titles: "Lic.", "Ing.", etc. as is with no note.

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 11:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 714

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  christopher bolton: totally agree
7 hrs
  -> Gracias, Chris.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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