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El libre examen

English translation: personal interpretation

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13:08 Nov 11, 2000
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: El libre examen
The context is the Spanish Inquisition, it is an old term meaning the right to interpret the bible as you wish as opposed to the church. Is there a term for this in English ?
Katrina Edbrooke
English translation:personal interpretation
Explanation:
This is the equivalent given by the Larousse Sp.-Eng. dic. and used by the Britannica, as in the following:

KARAISM, also spelled KARAITISM, or QARAISM (from Hebrew qara, "to read"), a Jewish religious movement that repudiated oral tradition as a source of divine law and defended the Hebrew Bible as the sole authentic font of religious doctrine and practice. In dismissing the Talmud as man-made law substituted for the God-given Torah, Karaism set itself in direct opposition to rabbinic Judaism. (see also Index: Oral law)
The movement began in 8th-century Persia. Though its members were never numerous, it spread to Egypt and Syria and later into Europe by way of Spain and Constantinople. Karaism proclaimed the Bible to be self-explanatory and sanctioned personal interpretations of the Scriptures.
Selected response from:

xxxJon Zuber
Grading comment
Thanks for the references. I suspect there is also a latin term which may have been used in English, or even Portugese as in auto-da-fe. However this phrase fits beautifully and is much clearer than 'free interpretation'which was what I would have resorted to. Thanks again.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
napersonal interpretationxxxJon Zuber
naFREE or NON-LITERAL INTERPRETATIONxxxLia Fail
naFREE or NON-LITERAL INTERPRETATIONxxxLia Fail
naUnorthodox interpretation of the Bible.
Luis Luis
naI believe in the modern parlance we would call it a "free
Parrot


  

Answers


54 mins
I believe in the modern parlance we would call it a "free


Explanation:
interpretation" as opposed to a literal one. (But then, God knows how the Inquisition interpreted that).

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 00:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
ZoeZoe
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1 hr
Unorthodox interpretation of the Bible.


Explanation:
A liberal interpretation of the bible.

Regards.
Luis M. Luis

Luis Luis
United States
Local time: 17:10
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 171

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Megdalina
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1 hr
FREE or NON-LITERAL INTERPRETATION


Explanation:
In answer to your question, I do not think there is a specific term. Of there was, it would probably be Latin. Another possible reason would be that the Inquisition did not directly affect English-speaking countries

See the web page below (Why was Spinoza Excommunicated?) which refers to FREE INTERPRETATION.

Another possibility is NON-LITERAL INTERPTRETATION


    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:www.tau.ac.il:81/~kashe...
xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 00:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1368
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
FREE or NON-LITERAL INTERPRETATION


Explanation:
In answer to your question, I do not think there is a specific term. Of there was, it would probably be Latin. Another possible reason would be that the Inquisition did not directly affect English-speaking countries

See the web page below (Why was Spinoza Excommunicated?) which refers to FREE INTERPRETATION.

Another possibility is NON-LITERAL INTERPTRETATION


    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:www.tau.ac.il:81/~kashe...
xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 00:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1368
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs
personal interpretation


Explanation:
This is the equivalent given by the Larousse Sp.-Eng. dic. and used by the Britannica, as in the following:

KARAISM, also spelled KARAITISM, or QARAISM (from Hebrew qara, "to read"), a Jewish religious movement that repudiated oral tradition as a source of divine law and defended the Hebrew Bible as the sole authentic font of religious doctrine and practice. In dismissing the Talmud as man-made law substituted for the God-given Torah, Karaism set itself in direct opposition to rabbinic Judaism. (see also Index: Oral law)
The movement began in 8th-century Persia. Though its members were never numerous, it spread to Egypt and Syria and later into Europe by way of Spain and Constantinople. Karaism proclaimed the Bible to be self-explanatory and sanctioned personal interpretations of the Scriptures.


xxxJon Zuber
PRO pts in pair: 172
Grading comment
Thanks for the references. I suspect there is also a latin term which may have been used in English, or even Portugese as in auto-da-fe. However this phrase fits beautifully and is much clearer than 'free interpretation'which was what I would have resorted to. Thanks again.
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