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granola

English translation: granola

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16:56 Aug 26, 2002
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: granola
una taza de granola
Marcela Robaina Boyd
Argentina
Local time: 03:26
English translation:granola
Explanation:
Good luck!

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Note added at 2002-08-26 17:06:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Do you know granola? A very popular food in North America, usually eaten for breakfast, granola seems to be unknown by most people here in Japan. I like it very much, but I wish it was more popular in this country, because I think that eating granola could be very beneficial for Japanese. It\'s not because it\'s tasty ... although it certainly is delicious, and it\'s not because it\'s healthy ... although it is a very nutritious food. What I have in mind is something quite different - granola is a slow food!

I realized this for the first time the other day when I was watching a friend eat granola. She took a spoonful and started chewing. Then she chewed some more ... and more ... and then put the spoon down, and chewed some more. Finally, she felt that it was ready, swallowed the mouthful, and only then picked up the spoon and took some more. It must have taken at least a full minute to eat that single small spoonful.

Now, compare this with typical Japanese eating. Whether it be breakfast, lunch or dinner, the pattern is usually the same. Take a mouthful, and then while still chewing, use the chopstick, spoon or whatever, to prepare the next \'load\'. Swallow, and immediately take in the next mouthful. There is never even time to put down the eating utensil. The food goes in ... down ... in ... down ... in a basically uninterrupted stream until the meal is over, usually in just a few minutes.

I encountered what was perhaps the extreme example of this type of eating while having lunch one day recently in downtown Tokyo, when I had a \'meal\' in a curry shop specializing in lunch for salary men. You buy your ticket from a machine at the door, then go and stand behind one of the diners as he sits at the counter eating. When he finishes and gets up to leave, you slip into his place, slap down your ticket, get your curry, and start eating. No sooner have you begun when somebody comes and stands behind you, waiting for his turn! All thoughts of a relaxed lunch disappear, and you wolf down mouthful after mouthful. Gulp, gulp, gulp. It doesn\'t take very long. Gochisosama! Oooooh ...

Is all this Japanese \'speed-eating\' healthy? Well of course as we all know, it isn\'t, but the general culture here is so highly energized, that slow relaxed meals are very rare indeed. The habit is ingrained from very young ages. My daughter Himi tells me that there are only ten to fifteen minutes allowed for eating their school lunch. The teacher is constantly driving them, \"Eat up. Eat up. There\'s no time for club ...\" Most days, Himi doesn\'t have enough time to finish, and has to throw away the left-overs! This is crazy. We all know this is crazy!

So let\'s try and change the pattern. I know we can\'t all take a two-hour lunch like people in some Latin countries, but how about trying a granola breakfast for a good start? It\'s tasty, it\'s very nutritious, and best of all - you can\'t eat it quickly! Slow down ... and live a little!


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-26 17:06:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Do you know granola? A very popular food in North America, usually eaten for breakfast, granola seems to be unknown by most people here in Japan. I like it very much, but I wish it was more popular in this country, because I think that eating granola could be very beneficial for Japanese. It\'s not because it\'s tasty ... although it certainly is delicious, and it\'s not because it\'s healthy ... although it is a very nutritious food. What I have in mind is something quite different - granola is a slow food!

I realized this for the first time the other day when I was watching a friend eat granola. She took a spoonful and started chewing. Then she chewed some more ... and more ... and then put the spoon down, and chewed some more. Finally, she felt that it was ready, swallowed the mouthful, and only then picked up the spoon and took some more. It must have taken at least a full minute to eat that single small spoonful.

Now, compare this with typical Japanese eating. Whether it be breakfast, lunch or dinner, the pattern is usually the same. Take a mouthful, and then while still chewing, use the chopstick, spoon or whatever, to prepare the next \'load\'. Swallow, and immediately take in the next mouthful. There is never even time to put down the eating utensil. The food goes in ... down ... in ... down ... in a basically uninterrupted stream until the meal is over, usually in just a few minutes.

I encountered what was perhaps the extreme example of this type of eating while having lunch one day recently in downtown Tokyo, when I had a \'meal\' in a curry shop specializing in lunch for salary men. You buy your ticket from a machine at the door, then go and stand behind one of the diners as he sits at the counter eating. When he finishes and gets up to leave, you slip into his place, slap down your ticket, get your curry, and start eating. No sooner have you begun when somebody comes and stands behind you, waiting for his turn! All thoughts of a relaxed lunch disappear, and you wolf down mouthful after mouthful. Gulp, gulp, gulp. It doesn\'t take very long. Gochisosama! Oooooh ...

Is all this Japanese \'speed-eating\' healthy? Well of course as we all know, it isn\'t, but the general culture here is so highly energized, that slow relaxed meals are very rare indeed. The habit is ingrained from very young ages. My daughter Himi tells me that there are only ten to fifteen minutes allowed for eating their school lunch. The teacher is constantly driving them, \"Eat up. Eat up. There\'s no time for club ...\" Most days, Himi doesn\'t have enough time to finish, and has to throw away the left-overs! This is crazy. We all know this is crazy!

So let\'s try and change the pattern. I know we can\'t all take a two-hour lunch like people in some Latin countries, but how about trying a granola breakfast for a good start? It\'s tasty, it\'s very nutritious, and best of all - you can\'t eat it quickly! Slow down ... and live a little!
Selected response from:

Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 08:26
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4granola
Fernando Muela
5GranolaSean Lyle
5granola
Henry Hinds
5GRANOLA
Maria Luisa Duarte


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
granola


Explanation:
Good luck!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-26 17:06:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Do you know granola? A very popular food in North America, usually eaten for breakfast, granola seems to be unknown by most people here in Japan. I like it very much, but I wish it was more popular in this country, because I think that eating granola could be very beneficial for Japanese. It\'s not because it\'s tasty ... although it certainly is delicious, and it\'s not because it\'s healthy ... although it is a very nutritious food. What I have in mind is something quite different - granola is a slow food!

I realized this for the first time the other day when I was watching a friend eat granola. She took a spoonful and started chewing. Then she chewed some more ... and more ... and then put the spoon down, and chewed some more. Finally, she felt that it was ready, swallowed the mouthful, and only then picked up the spoon and took some more. It must have taken at least a full minute to eat that single small spoonful.

Now, compare this with typical Japanese eating. Whether it be breakfast, lunch or dinner, the pattern is usually the same. Take a mouthful, and then while still chewing, use the chopstick, spoon or whatever, to prepare the next \'load\'. Swallow, and immediately take in the next mouthful. There is never even time to put down the eating utensil. The food goes in ... down ... in ... down ... in a basically uninterrupted stream until the meal is over, usually in just a few minutes.

I encountered what was perhaps the extreme example of this type of eating while having lunch one day recently in downtown Tokyo, when I had a \'meal\' in a curry shop specializing in lunch for salary men. You buy your ticket from a machine at the door, then go and stand behind one of the diners as he sits at the counter eating. When he finishes and gets up to leave, you slip into his place, slap down your ticket, get your curry, and start eating. No sooner have you begun when somebody comes and stands behind you, waiting for his turn! All thoughts of a relaxed lunch disappear, and you wolf down mouthful after mouthful. Gulp, gulp, gulp. It doesn\'t take very long. Gochisosama! Oooooh ...

Is all this Japanese \'speed-eating\' healthy? Well of course as we all know, it isn\'t, but the general culture here is so highly energized, that slow relaxed meals are very rare indeed. The habit is ingrained from very young ages. My daughter Himi tells me that there are only ten to fifteen minutes allowed for eating their school lunch. The teacher is constantly driving them, \"Eat up. Eat up. There\'s no time for club ...\" Most days, Himi doesn\'t have enough time to finish, and has to throw away the left-overs! This is crazy. We all know this is crazy!

So let\'s try and change the pattern. I know we can\'t all take a two-hour lunch like people in some Latin countries, but how about trying a granola breakfast for a good start? It\'s tasty, it\'s very nutritious, and best of all - you can\'t eat it quickly! Slow down ... and live a little!


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-26 17:06:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Do you know granola? A very popular food in North America, usually eaten for breakfast, granola seems to be unknown by most people here in Japan. I like it very much, but I wish it was more popular in this country, because I think that eating granola could be very beneficial for Japanese. It\'s not because it\'s tasty ... although it certainly is delicious, and it\'s not because it\'s healthy ... although it is a very nutritious food. What I have in mind is something quite different - granola is a slow food!

I realized this for the first time the other day when I was watching a friend eat granola. She took a spoonful and started chewing. Then she chewed some more ... and more ... and then put the spoon down, and chewed some more. Finally, she felt that it was ready, swallowed the mouthful, and only then picked up the spoon and took some more. It must have taken at least a full minute to eat that single small spoonful.

Now, compare this with typical Japanese eating. Whether it be breakfast, lunch or dinner, the pattern is usually the same. Take a mouthful, and then while still chewing, use the chopstick, spoon or whatever, to prepare the next \'load\'. Swallow, and immediately take in the next mouthful. There is never even time to put down the eating utensil. The food goes in ... down ... in ... down ... in a basically uninterrupted stream until the meal is over, usually in just a few minutes.

I encountered what was perhaps the extreme example of this type of eating while having lunch one day recently in downtown Tokyo, when I had a \'meal\' in a curry shop specializing in lunch for salary men. You buy your ticket from a machine at the door, then go and stand behind one of the diners as he sits at the counter eating. When he finishes and gets up to leave, you slip into his place, slap down your ticket, get your curry, and start eating. No sooner have you begun when somebody comes and stands behind you, waiting for his turn! All thoughts of a relaxed lunch disappear, and you wolf down mouthful after mouthful. Gulp, gulp, gulp. It doesn\'t take very long. Gochisosama! Oooooh ...

Is all this Japanese \'speed-eating\' healthy? Well of course as we all know, it isn\'t, but the general culture here is so highly energized, that slow relaxed meals are very rare indeed. The habit is ingrained from very young ages. My daughter Himi tells me that there are only ten to fifteen minutes allowed for eating their school lunch. The teacher is constantly driving them, \"Eat up. Eat up. There\'s no time for club ...\" Most days, Himi doesn\'t have enough time to finish, and has to throw away the left-overs! This is crazy. We all know this is crazy!

So let\'s try and change the pattern. I know we can\'t all take a two-hour lunch like people in some Latin countries, but how about trying a granola breakfast for a good start? It\'s tasty, it\'s very nutritious, and best of all - you can\'t eat it quickly! Slow down ... and live a little!


Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 251

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gabriela Tenenbaum: Yep. #:))
1 hr

agree  Rosa Garcia: mrsrag1981
7 hrs

agree  Ambra Principe
8 hrs

agree  LoreAC
18 hrs
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
granola


Explanation:
Es una marca. No se traduce, se deja igual.


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 00:26
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26512
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
GRANOLA


Explanation:
SAVORY GRANOLA CRACKERS
Categories: Cyberealm, Breads
Yield: 70 servings

2 c Rolled Oats
3/4 c Whole Wheat Flour
1/2 c Slivered Almonds
1/4 c Wheat Germ
1/4 c Sesame Seeds
1 tb Honey
1/2 ts Oregano
1 ts Thyme
1/2 ts Onionpowder
3 Eggs
3/4 c Oil

1. In a large bowl, stir together oats, flour, almonds, wheat germ,
sesame seeds, honey, oregano, thyme and onionpowder. 2. With a fork,
beat together eggs and oil. Stir into oat mix. 3. Grease 10 X 15 inch jelly
roll pan. 4. With a spatula, press dough evenly into prepared pan, and bake
in preheated, 400 F oven, for 20 minutes, until golden. 5. Cut into 1
1/2 inch squares, then into triangles. 6. Remove to a rack and cool. Store
in airtight container.
These unusual crackers will keep several weeks at room
temperature- several month in the refridgerator or freezer.


Maria Luisa Duarte
Spain
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 3168
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Granola


Explanation:
No, you can\'t tranlsate it, but here is some background - and indeed what more can you say?


    Reference: http://www.foodreference.com/html/artgranola.html
Sean Lyle
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 63
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