KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Other

Diablos cojuelos

English translation: ver explicación

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
21:55 Oct 16, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: Diablos cojuelos
the writer speaks of "liberating ourselves from the dominant 'diablos cojuelos' and ... a lot of intellectual bs after that...
what the divil is a d.c? a cloven hoofed devil? or what.
Martin Moore
Spain
Local time: 07:41
English translation:ver explicación
Explanation:
No conozco tu contexto, pero en España, un diablo cojuelo es un "diablo enredador y travieso" (DRAE), o sea, nada que ver con que sea cojo o le falte una pierna, sino con que no es malvado del todo sino que se limita a jugar con nosotros, a hacernos travesuras, pequeñas diabluras.

Una curiosidad: cuando, por ejemplo, algo cae al suelo y desaparece (una moneda o algo pequeño), puede considerarse obra del diablo cojuelo, una travesura. Mi padre, asturiano (lo digo porque igual es típico de aquella zona), me enseñó que para encontrar el objeto había que decir "Diablo cojuelo, los coj.... te ato, si no lo encuentro no te los desato". Teóricamente, así el diablillo se lo repensaba y encontrabas lo perdido.
Selected response from:

lidius
Spain
Local time: 07:41
Grading comment
I spoke to my editor, who's Navarrese, and she mentioned them quite matter of factly as mischievous spirits; I think this is the context, the diablos that the (catalan)writer refers to are the castilian authorities...so it stays in castellano, but now at least I know what he's talking about. moltes gracies, martin.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +3Don't translate it
Claudia Iglesias
4 +2lame devils
Karina Pelech
4 +2ver explicaciónlidius
5limping devilsDavid Welch
5limping devilsDavid Welch
4limping devilsjustathought
4lame / one-legged devilsRefugio


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lame devils


Explanation:
It seems like it...

the ending 'uelo' is derogatory, I guess that 'cojuelo' is the derogative for 'cojo'= 'lame'

Suerte ... ;)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-16 22:17:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A carnival out of this world\" was considered the La Vega Carnival, in the Dominican Republic. During all of February the \"Diablos Cojuelos\" will parade with their fabulous costumes, music and colorful style. The costumes are famous and its design this year was by Orlando Lora, an architect. There is expectation to see the 25 models of costumes, and the only thing that was leaked is that the colors are red and metallic gold. The origin of the La Vega Carnival goes back to 1514, but the \"Diablo Cojuelos made their first appearance in 1906.

A lot of evidence on the internet so as not to translate it... our suggestion would be not to...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-16 22:21:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Merengue and Carnaval - [ Traduzca esta página ]
... Most of the figures are devils with horns ‘(diablos cojuelos), as you can see ... public,
in San Pedro de Macoris, some wild dances (momises) reminds of English ...
www.caraibes-spirit.org/english/carnival.htm - 7k - En caché - Páginas similares

The Carnival - [ Traduzca esta página ]
... For example in Santiago costumes represent the diablos cojuelos (devils) with galactic
designs: in Cotui costumes are of platanuses and papeluses; in Monte ...
www.dominicana.com.do/english/carnival.htm - 12k - En caché - Páginas similares

World and I Magazine - [ Traduzca esta página ]
... FEATURED BOOK COMMENTARIES: Michael Ondaatje\'s The English Patient. Introduction;
The ... PATTERNS The Diablos Cojuelos Mischievous Devils of the Dominican Republic ...
205.178.185.71/subscribers/1993/february/index.shtml - 35k - En caché



Karina Pelech
Argentina
Local time: 02:41
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 975

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Welch: the diminutive in this case is not derogatory, but the oposite almost, ie affectionate, humorous
2 hrs
  -> and 'lame' can also be both affectionate, humorous and in other contexts, derogatory - thanks for your input anyway .. always apreciated ... saludos ...:o)

agree  Claudia Iglesias: Agree, don't translate it.
3 hrs
  -> muchas gracias Claudia ... ;)

agree  Judith Kerman: As it was explained to me, the Devil pretends to be lame so we won't run away too fast. Yes, a major figure in Dominican Carnaval.
6 hrs
  -> gracias Judith ... ;)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Don't translate it


Explanation:
It's a personage. You can say D.C (devils from Dominican Republic's carnival) or something like that.
They usually hit people with balloons that hurt a lot.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-17 00:14:32 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Give the points to the firs answer. Don\'t translate it and don\'t try to explain translating cojuelos by lame.
I lived there (6 years) and these devils have nothing to do with laming. It\'s their name, that\'s all.

Claudia Iglesias
Chile
Local time: 02:41
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 17

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marcela García
1 hr

agree  Karina Pelech: Thank for the support - but 'lame' (above) does not refer to 'laming' - it isn't the verb, it was put there to modify adjectivally to begin with, and try to explain something, which as we both agree upon, shouldn't be translated ... saludos Claudia .. :o)
2 hrs
  -> I understand, my English isn't good enough to explain what I mean. I only came to this pair because I knew these diablos (and some others, as I collect masks)

agree  Rualina
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
lame / one-legged devils


Explanation:
if that helps any. Non-translation, explanation in parens.

Refugio
Local time: 22:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1827
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
limping devils


Explanation:
see the following article:

www.metspirit.com/pages/arts3.html



Street Dance and More at Hispanic Festival | Rhonda Jones


Dr. Jana Sandarg, who spends her days teaching Augusta State University students about the Spanish language and culture, and sharing stories with them about her trips to Spanish-speaking countries, spoke excitedly about this weekend’s Hispanic Festival.

She began with Diablos Cojuelos, a dance group from the Dominican Republic, who will be attending the festival. The name, Sandarg said, translates to “Limping Devils.”

And she said that they really, really want to come here. To see us.

“They’re flying here on their own to come dance at our festival,” Sandarg said.

And here is a site dedicated to the carnival masks worn in SDomingo. In the articles concerning the devils it gives the follwing:

Quote
The central protagonist, however, is theDevil. "Lechones", "Diablos", "Toros", or "Cachuas", all represent The Evil One. The devils in Santiago are called "Lechones". They are the local conception of zoomorphic creatures that appear wherever pre-Lent pagan celebrations occur.

Unquote

http://dominicanmasks.com/



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-17 00:33:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

by the way, \"lechon\" refers to a \"suckling pig\" or \"a slob\"

David Welch
United States
Local time: 01:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 124
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
limping devils


Explanation:
see the following article:

www.metspirit.com/pages/arts3.html



Street Dance and More at Hispanic Festival | Rhonda Jones


Dr. Jana Sandarg, who spends her days teaching Augusta State University students about the Spanish language and culture, and sharing stories with them about her trips to Spanish-speaking countries, spoke excitedly about this weekend’s Hispanic Festival.

She began with Diablos Cojuelos, a dance group from the Dominican Republic, who will be attending the festival. The name, Sandarg said, translates to “Limping Devils.”

And she said that they really, really want to come here. To see us.

“They’re flying here on their own to come dance at our festival,” Sandarg said.

And here is a site dedicated to the carnival masks worn in SDomingo. In the articles concerning the devils it gives the follwing:

Quote
The central protagonist, however, is theDevil. "Lechones", "Diablos", "Toros", or "Cachuas", all represent The Evil One. The devils in Santiago are called "Lechones". They are the local conception of zoomorphic creatures that appear wherever pre-Lent pagan celebrations occur.

Unquote

http://dominicanmasks.com/



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-17 00:43:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is a reference from the Real Academia:


1 adj.-s. Dim. de cojo.
2 Diablo Cojuelo, en el folklore, diablillo travieso y enredador; su tradición popular inspiró a Vélez de Guevara (1579-1644) una novela titulada El diablo cojuelo.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-17 00:49:24 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PS

I see that I sent this twice, so my apoligies in advance to the group.

David Welch
United States
Local time: 01:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 124
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
ver explicación


Explanation:
No conozco tu contexto, pero en España, un diablo cojuelo es un "diablo enredador y travieso" (DRAE), o sea, nada que ver con que sea cojo o le falte una pierna, sino con que no es malvado del todo sino que se limita a jugar con nosotros, a hacernos travesuras, pequeñas diabluras.

Una curiosidad: cuando, por ejemplo, algo cae al suelo y desaparece (una moneda o algo pequeño), puede considerarse obra del diablo cojuelo, una travesura. Mi padre, asturiano (lo digo porque igual es típico de aquella zona), me enseñó que para encontrar el objeto había que decir "Diablo cojuelo, los coj.... te ato, si no lo encuentro no te los desato". Teóricamente, así el diablillo se lo repensaba y encontrabas lo perdido.


lidius
Spain
Local time: 07:41
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 4
Grading comment
I spoke to my editor, who's Navarrese, and she mentioned them quite matter of factly as mischievous spirits; I think this is the context, the diablos that the (catalan)writer refers to are the castilian authorities...so it stays in castellano, but now at least I know what he's talking about. moltes gracies, martin.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Endre Both: Delicious explanation, whether or not it applies here. Thanks!
5 hrs
  -> Gracias por lo de "delicious", me encanta el adjetivo.

agree  CNF: :^D ¡Buenísimo! Parecido a "Santo Pilato, la cola te ato, si no me das suerte, no te desato." ;^)
13 hrs
  -> No conocía el de Pilato. A este paso, ¡ya me veo haciendo nudos todo el santo día!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2117 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
limping devils


Explanation:
I was born in Dominican Republic and lived there for 14 years before moving to the USA. I agree with the person(s) who posted that the correct meaning would be "mischiveous devils" -- and then again, I also agree with the translation of "limping devils."

I am quite sure that the original meaning was "mischiveous devils" -- but its usage in D.R., which would be translated as "limping devils," refers to the fact that the devils would feign to be limping in order to catch people unaware and hit them (hard) with their vejigas.

This is just another example of how usage of a word can change from country to country.

justathought
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search