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libras carlinas

English translation: Caroline libra/pound

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:libras carlinas
English translation:Caroline libra/pound
Entered by: Ross Andrew Parker
Options:
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01:01 Feb 2, 2009
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Other / Falconry / 13th century / Spain
Spanish term or phrase: libras carlinas
"Quien mate o hiera ave que no debe. Por el azor garcero, cien sueldos; por el otro azor prima, sesenta sueldos; y por el azor torzuelo, treinta sueldos; y por el gavilán garcero, cinco sueldos; y por el mochuelo un sueldo; y por todo halcón garcero treinta sueldos; y por otro halcón neblí o baharí, sesenta sueldos"…
"Que ninguno sea osado de tomar huevos de halcones, azores, ni pollos de ellos, en nido ni fuera de él, en ninguna manera, ni ballestee ni eche los nidos de los dichos azores ni halcones, so pena de doscientas **libras carlinas**, y de perder la tal ave o aves que hubiese tomado, o hecho sacar los huevos en la manera sobredicha"
Robert Forstag
United States
Local time: 18:44
Caroline pound
Explanation:
If you're going to translate it:

Reference: libras carolinas

Reference information:
Perhaps it should be "libras carolinas": http://www.euskomedia.org/PDFAnlt/cmn/1919235237.pdf

carolino, na.

1. adj. Natural de las Carolinas. U. t. c. s.

2. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a estas islas del océano Pacífico.

3. adj. Referente a la persona o reinado de algún Carlos, especialmente Carlos V.

Quick definitions (Caroline)

▸ adjective: of or relating to the life and times of kings Charles I or Charles II of England

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Note added at 5 hrs (2009-02-02 06:34:43 GMT)
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Main Entry:
Car·o·line Listen to the pronunciation of Caroline
Pronunciation:
\ˈka-rə-ˌlīn, -lən\
Variant(s):
or Car·o·le·an Listen to the pronunciation of Carolean \ˌka-rə-ˈlē-ən\
Function:
adjective
Etymology:
New Latin carolinus, from Medieval Latin Carolus Charles
Date:
1652

: of or relating to Charles —used especially with reference to Charles I and Charles II of England


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2009-02-02 06:35:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Caroline


Car·o·line [ kárrə ln, kérrə lin ] or Car·o·le·an [ kàrrə l ən ]


adjective
Definition:

1. of Charles I and II: relating to the English kings Charles I and Charles II or their reigns

2. of monarch named Charles: relating to any king or emperor called Charles

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2009-02-02 07:09:34 GMT)
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Or Caroline libras
I suppose you won't be translating "sueldos" and the general practice seems to be NOT to translate these references to historical coins/currencies:

The Shipmaster's Assistant, and Commercial Digest: Containing Information ...‎ - Página 392
de Joseph Blunt - 1837 - 683 páginas
At Valencia in libras of 20 sueldos, each sueldo being 12 dineros. Sometimes in
reals of new plate of 24 dineros each. In Spain the reals have 9 varieties, ...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro - Add to my shared library - Más ediciones


A History of the Inquisition of Spain‎ - Página 565
de Henry Charles Lea - 1906
... there being 20 sueldos to the libra and 12 dineros to the sueldo. ...
Unification of currency throughout the monarchy was a desirable object, ...
Vista de fragmentos - Acerca de este libro - Add to my shared library - Más ediciones
Selected response from:

Ross Andrew Parker
Local time: 00:44
Grading comment
Thanks, Ross. And thanks also to everyone else who responded and commented.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2Caroline pound
Ross Andrew Parker
3See.
Juan Jacob
2Carolingian pounds
marybro
Summary of reference entries provided
Libra
Christine Walsh
libras carolinas
Ross Andrew Parker
Libras carolinasDavid Brown

  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
See.


Explanation:
Pues el DRAE dice: Carlín, del italiano carlino, de Carlos I de Anjou, rey de Nápoles. Moneda española pequeña y de plata, que circuló en España desde el siglo 16.
Ahora bien, dices que tu texto es del siglo 13... ahí tenemos un problema. "Carlina pound", ¿será?
Saludos.



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Note added at 28 minutos (2009-02-02 01:30:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Al seguir buscando, hallé este enlace, útil para ahora y probablemente tus futuras preguntas:

http://www.euskomedia.org/PDFAnlt/cmn/1919235237.pdf

Juan Jacob
Mexico
Local time: 17:44
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 20
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Carolingian pounds


Explanation:
The pound has been a weight unit since the time of the Romans (libra; therefore the abbreviation L.) One Carolinian pound equalled 20 shillings at 12 denare, a value relation that survived in England until 1971.

Economic and legal reforms
Charlemagne was faced with a variety of currencies at the start of his reign. To correct problems these various currencies caused, he standardized a system based on a pound of silver (Livre tournois). Deniers were minted with a value of 240 deniers to a pound of silver. A second value, the solidus, was also created as an accounting device with a value of twelve deniers or one twentieth of a pound of silver. The solidus was not minted but was instead used to record values such as a "solidus of grain" which was equal to the amount of grain that twelve deniers could purchase.[6]





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 57 mins (2009-02-02 01:59:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://e-articles.info/e/a/title/The-Carolingian-Reform/

Around a.d. 755 the Carolingian Reform established the European monetary system, which can be expressed as:

1 pound = 20 shillings = 240 pennies

Originally the pound was a weight of silver rather than a coin, and from a pound of pure silver 240 pennies were struck. The Carolingian Reform restored the silver content of a penny that was already in circulation and was the direct descendant of the Roman denarius. The shilling was a reference to the solidi, the money of account that prevailed in Europe before the Carolingian Reform. The solidi money of account originated from the Byzantine gold coin that was the foundation of the international monetary system for more than 500 years. The shilling acted to bridge the new monetary system to the old, an important role because debts contracted prior to the Reform were defined in solidi.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-02 02:04:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.answers.com/topic/western-europe
Money and coinage

Silver provided the essential link between physical coins and the monetary systems in most principalities, in that the silver penny (with a few exceptions) always equalled the value of one penny in that principality's money of account: i.e., the denarius, denaro, denier, Pfenning. From Carolingian times (c. 795), the most widely used system in western Europe (except in Spain and parts of Germany) was based on the pound (libra, lira, livre, Pfund)—originally equal in value to the Carolingian pound weight of silver (489.51 g). For accounting purposes, it was subdivided into twenty shillings (solidi, soldi, sous, Schillingen), which in turn were subdivided into twelve pennies or pence, so that each money-of-account pound always consisted of 240 currently circulating pennies. For centuries, the only silver coins struck were the various regional pennies (and their subdivisions); and not until the later twelfth and thirteenth centuries did some Italian city-states, and then France, introduce heavier weight silver coins, known as grossi or gros. The Florentine grosso or fiorino was in fact first struck (in 1237) with a value of 12d (denari), as was the French gros tournois (12 deniers), from 1266; but England did not issue such a "shilling coin," known as the teston, until 1504


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolingian_Renaissance
marybro
Local time: 18:44
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Caroline pound


Explanation:
If you're going to translate it:

Reference: libras carolinas

Reference information:
Perhaps it should be "libras carolinas": http://www.euskomedia.org/PDFAnlt/cmn/1919235237.pdf

carolino, na.

1. adj. Natural de las Carolinas. U. t. c. s.

2. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a estas islas del océano Pacífico.

3. adj. Referente a la persona o reinado de algún Carlos, especialmente Carlos V.

Quick definitions (Caroline)

▸ adjective: of or relating to the life and times of kings Charles I or Charles II of England

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2009-02-02 06:34:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Main Entry:
Car·o·line Listen to the pronunciation of Caroline
Pronunciation:
\ˈka-rə-ˌlīn, -lən\
Variant(s):
or Car·o·le·an Listen to the pronunciation of Carolean \ˌka-rə-ˈlē-ən\
Function:
adjective
Etymology:
New Latin carolinus, from Medieval Latin Carolus Charles
Date:
1652

: of or relating to Charles —used especially with reference to Charles I and Charles II of England


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2009-02-02 06:35:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Caroline


Car·o·line [ kárrə ln, kérrə lin ] or Car·o·le·an [ kàrrə l ən ]


adjective
Definition:

1. of Charles I and II: relating to the English kings Charles I and Charles II or their reigns

2. of monarch named Charles: relating to any king or emperor called Charles

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2009-02-02 07:09:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or Caroline libras
I suppose you won't be translating "sueldos" and the general practice seems to be NOT to translate these references to historical coins/currencies:

The Shipmaster's Assistant, and Commercial Digest: Containing Information ...‎ - Página 392
de Joseph Blunt - 1837 - 683 páginas
At Valencia in libras of 20 sueldos, each sueldo being 12 dineros. Sometimes in
reals of new plate of 24 dineros each. In Spain the reals have 9 varieties, ...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro - Add to my shared library - Más ediciones


A History of the Inquisition of Spain‎ - Página 565
de Henry Charles Lea - 1906
... there being 20 sueldos to the libra and 12 dineros to the sueldo. ...
Unification of currency throughout the monarchy was a desirable object, ...
Vista de fragmentos - Acerca de este libro - Add to my shared library - Más ediciones

Ross Andrew Parker
Local time: 00:44
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
Thanks, Ross. And thanks also to everyone else who responded and commented.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Brown
1 hr
  -> Thanks, David.

agree  Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Smart.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


55 mins
Reference: Libra

Reference information:
Haven't found your 'libra carlina' but there's sth. here about Spanish libras, no translation I'm afraid.


    Reference: http://www.maravedis.org/
Christine Walsh
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 28
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs
Reference: libras carolinas

Reference information:
Perhaps it should be "libras carolinas": http://www.euskomedia.org/PDFAnlt/cmn/1919235237.pdf

Ross Andrew Parker
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 40
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs
Reference: Libras carolinas

Reference information:
Although I agreed with Ross, it could in fact be libras carlinas or carlines

http://www.euskomedia.org/PDFAnlt/cmn/1919235237.pdf

In this article it explains the currencies used and their relationship with libras carolinas

David Brown
Spain
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 85
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Changes made by editors
Feb 8, 2009 - Changes made by Ross Andrew Parker:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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