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flauta dulce

English translation: recorder

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:flauta dulce
English translation:recorder
Entered by: Sean Lyle
Options:
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21:39 Jan 28, 2003
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: flauta dulce
debido a la gran cantidad de traducciones que encontre de este termino queria confirmar con alguno de ustedes
Gracias
Cristina d`Ambrosio
Argentina
Local time: 07:23
recorder
Explanation:
just to back up Raúl Waldman's note: wass called the fipple-flute in earlier mediaeval times, and not to be mistaken for the flageolet, which had fewer holes. Flageolet is often used now for the "tin whistle", used by a lot of Irish bands.

I just found this reference:
http://baroque-music.com/wc/info/flute.shtml

recorder. (French flûte à bec; German Blockflöte; Italian flauto diretto; Spanish flauta de pico). Woodwind instrument of ancient lineage, made without reed. Forerunner of the flute, but end-blown through a whistle-mouthpiece. In medieval times, the recorder was known under the Latin name fistula, hence 'fipple-flute'. It had seven finger-holes in front and a thumb-hole behind, and a beak-shaped mouthpiece. The antiquity of the instrument is hard to determine because its playing position is so like that of similar instrument (other whistle types), that contemporary illustrations are of little help. But it has been estimated as being in existence in the 12th century, although the word 'recorder' first appeared in a document in 1388. A recorder tutor was published in Venice, 1535. By the 15th century, there were several sizes of recorder. Praetorius lists 8, i.e. great bass, quint bass, bass, tenor, alto, two soprano, sopranino. Thus, recorder consorts were a common feature of Renaissance music life. The instrument has been widely revived in the 20th century both as an easy instrument for children and as a part of the revival in performing early music on authentic instruments. Modern composers have written for it, e.g. Britten, Arnold Cooke, and Rubbra. The most common size today is the descant (soprano), but there are also sopranino, treble (alto), tenor, and bass.
Selected response from:

Sean Lyle
Local time: 11:23
Grading comment
Thank you all for your help

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +7recorder
Raúl Waldman
5 +4recorderSean Lyle
5 +1recorderRefugio
5 +1recorder
GoodWords


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
recorder


Explanation:
Es el que yo conozco.

(Hace varios siglos, no había grabadores...)

Raúl Waldman
Argentina
Local time: 07:23
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 636

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxOso: ¡Saludos, Raúl! ¶:^)
4 mins
  -> Un saludo cordial para el Gran Oso, desde la Argentina.

agree  Sean Lyle: hole in one, there's no other word for it, but fipple-flute...
10 mins
  -> Sean, you really know a lot!

agree  NoraBellettieri
1 hr
  -> ¡Gracias, Nora!

agree  mónica alfonso
2 hrs
  -> ¡Gracias, Mónica!

agree  Sarah Ponting
9 hrs
  -> Thank you, Sarah.

agree  xxxEDLING
10 hrs
  -> Gracias, Edling.

agree  Marsha Wilkie
18 hrs
  -> Thank you, Marsha!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
recorder


Explanation:
+

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-28 21:45:21 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

El ABC de la Flauta Dulce + The ABC\'s of Recorder Playing
http://www.grainger.de/dbe/sbs/bodemann002.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-28 23:05:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, I am puzzled by the statement that you have found a great many translations for this instrument. I only know of this one. In the other direction, English to Spanish, there are many.

Refugio
Local time: 02:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1827

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NoraBellettieri
1 hr
  -> Thanks Nora
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
recorder


Explanation:
No conozco ningún otro término más correcto que este.


    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=flauta+du...
GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 04:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1449

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NoraBellettieri
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
recorder


Explanation:
just to back up Raúl Waldman's note: wass called the fipple-flute in earlier mediaeval times, and not to be mistaken for the flageolet, which had fewer holes. Flageolet is often used now for the "tin whistle", used by a lot of Irish bands.

I just found this reference:
http://baroque-music.com/wc/info/flute.shtml

recorder. (French flûte à bec; German Blockflöte; Italian flauto diretto; Spanish flauta de pico). Woodwind instrument of ancient lineage, made without reed. Forerunner of the flute, but end-blown through a whistle-mouthpiece. In medieval times, the recorder was known under the Latin name fistula, hence 'fipple-flute'. It had seven finger-holes in front and a thumb-hole behind, and a beak-shaped mouthpiece. The antiquity of the instrument is hard to determine because its playing position is so like that of similar instrument (other whistle types), that contemporary illustrations are of little help. But it has been estimated as being in existence in the 12th century, although the word 'recorder' first appeared in a document in 1388. A recorder tutor was published in Venice, 1535. By the 15th century, there were several sizes of recorder. Praetorius lists 8, i.e. great bass, quint bass, bass, tenor, alto, two soprano, sopranino. Thus, recorder consorts were a common feature of Renaissance music life. The instrument has been widely revived in the 20th century both as an easy instrument for children and as a part of the revival in performing early music on authentic instruments. Modern composers have written for it, e.g. Britten, Arnold Cooke, and Rubbra. The most common size today is the descant (soprano), but there are also sopranino, treble (alto), tenor, and bass.


    Reference: http://baroque-music.com/wc/info/flute.shtml
Sean Lyle
Local time: 11:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 63
Grading comment
Thank you all for your help

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Raúl Waldman: Bravo, 'maestro'!
22 mins

agree  sanlev
36 mins

agree  NoraBellettieri: I've found it in both Simon and Shuster's International Dictionary & in the English Language and Culture
1 hr

agree  Mary Bauer
13 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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