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subjunctive mood

English translation: it is a non-specific reference

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20:46 Dec 11, 2010
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Other / a sentence in a textbook
Spanish term or phrase: subjunctive mood
Dame la bolsa menos pesada que tengas, no pueda levantar nada pesado.

I don't quite understand why 'tengas' is used here (subjuntivo), and not 'tienes' (indicativo).
Sterk
Ukraine
Local time: 00:57
English translation:it is a non-specific reference
Explanation:
This is a tricky one. I'd say it falls into the "non-specific reference" category, making if equivalent to "whichever/whatever" Example: whichever traducción Ingles - Espanol : whichever a pron 1 (=no matter which) whichever of the methods you choose cualquiera de los métodos que escojas, ...
diccionario.reverso.net/ingles-espanol/whichever - Similares. Brian Steel gives an example in his book <<Translation from Spanish: An Introductory Course>> published by Sociedad General Española de Librería, including: Dame el aparato o como se llame (Give me the mahine or whatever you call it). The "que tengas" ("que" also often precipitates the use of the subjunctive) is the rough equivalent of "lo qur haya" or "lo que sea". I hope this helps!
Selected response from:

Jenni Lukac
Local time: 23:57
Grading comment
Muchas gracias por sus explicasiones. Ya todo está más o menos claro!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4it is a non-specific reference
Jenni Lukac
4 +1Give me the lightest of your bags
schevallier


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Dame la bolsa menos pesada que tengas
Give me the lightest of your bags


Explanation:
...because I can't carry heavy loads

(secuencia de tiempos en ES)

:)

schevallier
Local time: 23:57
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilmac: "the lightest you might just perchance happen to have" :-)
35 mins
  -> Thanks neilmac!
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
it is a non-specific reference


Explanation:
This is a tricky one. I'd say it falls into the "non-specific reference" category, making if equivalent to "whichever/whatever" Example: whichever traducción Ingles - Espanol : whichever a pron 1 (=no matter which) whichever of the methods you choose cualquiera de los métodos que escojas, ...
diccionario.reverso.net/ingles-espanol/whichever - Similares. Brian Steel gives an example in his book <<Translation from Spanish: An Introductory Course>> published by Sociedad General Española de Librería, including: Dame el aparato o como se llame (Give me the mahine or whatever you call it). The "que tengas" ("que" also often precipitates the use of the subjunctive) is the rough equivalent of "lo qur haya" or "lo que sea". I hope this helps!

Jenni Lukac
Local time: 23:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 106
Grading comment
Muchas gracias por sus explicasiones. Ya todo está más o menos claro!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilmac: yes, a sort of hypothesising nuance often hard to grasp
23 mins
  -> Thanks Neil. "Perchance" it is. I could be understood as "The lightest bag you might happen to have..."

agree  Jairo Payan
4 hrs
  -> Cheers and thanks, Jairo.

agree  Beatriz Ramírez de Haro: Good!
11 hrs
  -> Thanks Beatriz, especially for mentioning the "pueda/puedo" error at the end.

agree  Charles Davis: Yes; some grammarians explain it differently, but I think this is the essential issue: what they called "indefinite antecedent" when I was at school (some time ago!).
14 hrs
  -> Thanks Charles. "Indefinite antecedent" is another term for this "cajon de sastre" use of the subjuctive. What never ceases to amaze me is that native speakers, whatever their level of schooling, never make errors with the subjunctive.
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