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marujas

English translation: a bunch of old biddies

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13:18 Apr 15, 2001
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: marujas
se burlaron de nosotras y dijeron que éramos unas MARUJAS

this refers to a group of women fighting for the right to fish in an all-male lagoon
jle171
English translation:a bunch of old biddies
Explanation:
That's how I think the men's English counterparts would have called the women. The capital P is now, I believe, no longer used. The bare term, "biddies", or in Scotland, "wifies", just would not sound right at all.
Selected response from:

Paul Becke
Local time: 02:33
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nameddling housewivesxxxGeorge A.R
nagossipmonger
Ricardo Galarza
nahussiesPaul Becke
naold biddies
Berni Armstrong
namarujas = birdbrain females or pea-brain broadsAna-Maria Hulse
najust a bunch of women
Parrot
naa bunch of old biddiesPaul Becke
naordinary housewives
María T. Vargas
nafishwiveslengualabs
nagossipsjgross
na"wee wifies"Paul Becke
na"Biddies"Paul Becke
nafishwiveslengualabs


  

Answers


17 mins
fishwives


Explanation:
this is a negative term applied to women
-it implies they are gossips etc i.e

lengualabs
PRO pts in pair: 9
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18 mins
fishwives


Explanation:
this is a negative term applied to women
-it implies they are gossips etc

lengualabs
PRO pts in pair: 9
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52 mins
ordinary housewives


Explanation:
In Spain it is a derogatory name used to refer to ordinary housewives with little education and lack of training in any profession. "Maruja" is a nickname for "María" which is the most common female name in Spain


    This term is used by all media, every day.
María T. Vargas
Spain
Local time: 03:33
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 650

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Ana-Maria Hulse
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1 hr
gossips


Explanation:
This is really untranslatable as a single word. "Fishwives" implies working class, and "marujas" can perfectly well be middle class, at least lower middle class. Dictionaries give the translation "traditional housewife;" fair enough, but you need to understand that it is a derogatory term implying ignorance and lack of horizons. "Marujas" are the women who are interested in the magazines they look at (rather than read) in the hairdresser's, the TV, the neighbours and little else.

jgross
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1 hr
"wee wifies"


Explanation:
Scots dialect, I realise, is not the lingua franca, but, as a matter of interest, I think it is as exact a translation of the associated overtones as it is possible to imagine.

Paul Becke
Local time: 02:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 41
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2 hrs
"Biddies"


Explanation:
On further reflection, "Biddies", Biddy being an abbreviation for "Bridget".

"Old Biddy" or "Biddies" is a common English vernacualr term.

Paul Becke
Local time: 02:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 41

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Sarah Brenchley
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2 hrs
a bunch of old biddies


Explanation:
That's how I think the men's English counterparts would have called the women. The capital P is now, I believe, no longer used. The bare term, "biddies", or in Scotland, "wifies", just would not sound right at all.

Paul Becke
Local time: 02:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 41
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Berni Armstrong

mjnmc
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2 hrs
just a bunch of women


Explanation:
Wow, what a problem. I know this story, the problem is that some of the women are in their 20s and hardly uneducated; some wanted to fish because it had been in their family for ages; they organized themselves into a cooperative and hardly can be called gossips, much less "old" (its a new generation) or fishwives (more like "fish-daughters"). Their fight is against the tradition, not anything else, and the law backs them. I don't think it would help to call them anything downright degrading, although "Maruja" certainly has that connotation (small-minded female).

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 03:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645
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10 hrs
gossipmonger


Explanation:
"... and they said that we were a bunch of gossipmongers".
"Maruja" en el sentido utilizado es un lugarismo para referirse a una de las ascepciones del término "comadre" y a la única de "comadrera" o "comadrero" (alguien propenso al chisme o a la hablilla), para lo cual el inglés no presenta una contraparte muy precisa, ni en lo oficial ni en lo coloquial, ni siquiera en el vernáculo. El propio Shakespeare titula: "The Merry Wives of Windsor", en su comedia casi unánimente traducida como "Las alegres comadres de Windsor".
Pero sí nos podemos poner de acuerdo que en este caso "Maruja" es utilizado para mencionar a una comadre o comadrera. Veamos, entonces, lo que dicen los diccionarios al respecto:

Simon and Shuster's Int'l Dicitionary

comadrero,ra. a. gossiping, talebearing. (person)-m.f. gossip, gossipmonger, tattler.

Diccionario Larousse Esp.-Ing. Eng.-Sp.

comadrero,ra. adj. Gossiping -M. y F. Gossip, gossipmonger.

Las opciones serían entonces dos: "gossip" y "gossipmonger"; y yo me inclinaría por esta última puesto que "gossip" es también el chisme en sí. No está mal, podrían utilizarse ambas indistintamente, pero sería más preciso e inequívoco "gossipmonger".

En cuanto a "fishwives", como mencionara alguien anteriormente, simplemente sería una traducción incorrecta, puesto que el término refiere más bien a una mujer mal hablada, que profiere improperios u obscenidades, o a alguien que regaña mucho, que no es siempre el caso de una comadrera o maruja, que puede ser, como lo demuestra palmariamente Shakespeare, "alegre".
La definición del Webster's New World Dictionary dice lo siguiente:
fishwife...()2 a coarse, scolding woman

Suerte y un saludo cordial




Ricardo Galarza
Uruguay
Local time: 23:33
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 407
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16 hrs
meddling housewives


Explanation:
In this context, the use of the term maruja should be understood
as meaning "women, stop meddling and go back were you belong!" (i.e. the favorite totem of the masculine sexist bias, the household. )
That's why I think this translation translates the expression in its more precise measure.


    Everyday use
xxxGeorge A.R

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
chernandez
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17 hrs
hussies


Explanation:
Always roundly dismissive, but the word does not need a qualifying phrase, such as "a bunch of.."; also, it does not have to imply sexual promiscuity, although it often does. But then reference to their putative sexual morals is an age-old way in which males have tended to express disapproval of women. "Hussies" sounds right to me. Biased though I may be...!

Paul Becke
Local time: 02:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 41
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21 hrs
old biddies


Explanation:
This is to second that answer... and also to complain bitterly that a colleague gave that answer a peer graded "0" - That is an obvious misuse of the system. If whoever did it is not familiar with the term - they should not assume that it is therefore necessarily wrong. If the target audience are UK English speakers I feel that is a perfect translation of the term. (IRL UK speakers even more so) - perhaps a US Engl speaker might not be that familiar with the term, but that does not warrant a "0" - such peer grades should only be given if the answer was totally off beam. Reading "Maricas" for "Marujas" for example and suggesting "Faggots" -

The idea of Peer Grading is to encourage colleagues to help users decide, not to play competitive games and allow personal prejudices to influence such decisions.

Berni

CAT/ENG Moderator

Berni Armstrong
Local time: 03:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 71
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1 day 41 mins
marujas = birdbrain females or pea-brain broads


Explanation:
being that "Maruja" is one nickname for María, a very common name for women in the Hispanic world then the implication here, as others have said before, is that it is used in a derogatory way.
My colloquial translation would be
"birdbrain females" ... again, it gives color and it is derogatory.

Good luck.


    my own experience with English. I am a native of Spanish.
Ana-Maria Hulse
United States
Local time: 18:33
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 61
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