KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Other

tirar la casa por la ventana

English translation: brings the house down.

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
07:15 Jun 20, 2001
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: tirar la casa por la ventana
"Nuestra Musica" tira la casa por la ventana (title). The writer is lauding this muscical. Is this a figurative expression?
Bonnie Lawler
English translation:brings the house down.
Explanation:
Commonly used to denote that an artistic presentation is received enthusiastically and applauded heartily by the audience. If you can book a band that will bring the house down you will also fill your pockets with profits. Hope this helps you. awatts
Selected response from:

AWatts
Local time: 08:43
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
nabrings the house down.AWatts
naGoes all out
Rafaela Graffos
na"leaves everything else behind"Christine Salinas
napulls out all the stops...Heathcliff
nato go overboard
Henry Hinds


  

Answers


29 mins
to go overboard


Explanation:
"Nuestra Música 'Our Music' really goes overboard..."

Yes. Very common expression.


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 06:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26512

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Christine Salinas: "Overboard" has a negative connotation
36 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

37 mins
pulls out all the stops...


Explanation:
Obviously, an idiomatic or figurative expression like "tirar (or "echar") la casa por la ventana" can't be rendered literally. Well, actually, it can, but to "throw the house out through the window" doesn't quite make it.

"Pulling out all the stops" is a reference to the mechanism of pipe organs. When the organist removes the obstructions (the stops) from the pipes, the result is an open, full-throated, and potentially maximally LOUD musical performance.

That one seems to fit your context best, given its musical roots. But there are also "blows the roof off" (if you want to preserve the architectural metaphor), "lets it all hang out," or, if you prefer the understated route, "doesn't suck."

Cheers,
HC


    (my musically misspent youth, among others...!)
Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 05:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 843
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
"leaves everything else behind"


Explanation:
Yes, this is a figurative expression that means that their music is above the rest.

Hope this helps!

Christine Salinas
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
Goes all out


Explanation:
The term is often used as to weddings in which money is no object or sales everything is priced to the bottom dollar.


    personal experience as translator and interpreter
Rafaela Graffos
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 89
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
brings the house down.


Explanation:
Commonly used to denote that an artistic presentation is received enthusiastically and applauded heartily by the audience. If you can book a band that will bring the house down you will also fill your pockets with profits. Hope this helps you. awatts


    common expression found in reviews by entertainment critics.
AWatts
Local time: 08:43
PRO pts in pair: 28
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search