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bocadillo

English translation: roll

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:bocadillo
English translation:roll
Entered by: Thomas Bollmann
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

05:55 Jul 8, 2001
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: bocadillo
I need a word for "bocadillo". It will appears in a menu together with sandwich. What can I use? Please do not propose sandwich because I will write sandwich right after "bocadillo".
Thank you!
nakota
roll
Explanation:
Please see my comments on the first suggestion. French Bread Sandwich is OK but is longer on a menu. Rolls have existed in the English language for at least a century (I'm just about to have lunch so don't have time to look it up!)
Selected response from:

Sean Lyle
Local time: 02:03
Grading comment
Thank you very much to all of you!! All are good options. I have choosen this because it is the one that most suits the context.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2NO ESTOY DE ACUERDO CON NINGUNA OPCION DE "SANDWICH"bea0
na +2it can be called a "sub" in Americajules123
na +1Bocadillo (boh-cah-dee-yoh)
Rei
na +1French bread sandwich
flaviofbg
na +1Baguette sandwich (bocadillo)
Evert DELOOF-SYS
naCrusty rollSean Lyle
naUn comentario...bea0
naSORRYnakota
narollSean Lyle
naMil disculpas, pero falta un pequeño detalle...bea0
nabaguette sandwichxxxtazdog
na -1stevedore sandwichHeathcliff
na -1filled roll
Thomas Bollmann
na -1Bocadillo sandwich
jgal
na -2[LEAVE IT AS IT IS]DR. RICHARD BAVRY
na -2cocktail canape
Elinor Thomas
na -6snack?
jgal


  

Answers


4 mins peer agreement (net): -6
snack?


Explanation:
bocadillo
(nm) (Esp) sandwich;
tomar un ~, to have a snack;


    Reference: http://wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=bocadill...
jgal
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  flaviofbg: Not exactly
6 mins

disagree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: too all inclusive...ranges far away from sandwich concept
8 mins

disagree  Sean Lyle: The sources all say "snack" but the essence of bocadillo is that it is whole (section) of a loaf: why not "ROLL"?
18 mins

disagree  Sarah Brenchley: snack is too vague
1 hr

disagree  Pilar T. Bayle: can be anything
5 hrs

disagree  bea0: Dear Pilar, "bocadillo" in Spanish can also be anything...:)
10 hrs
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15 mins peer agreement (net): +1
French bread sandwich


Explanation:
No doubt about it. You can use it to distinguish a "Bocadillo" from a standard "Sandwich" - "french bread" is what we call "pan" or "barra de pan" in Spain, not the soft square bread of standard sandwiches. Look at the link below to see how much this term is used in contrast to standard square sandwiches.

Good Luck, Flavio


    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&q=%22french+brea...
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 72

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: call a Spanish sandwich French! Cuidado!
10 mins
  -> 1)It means the BREAD is french-style,not that the bocadillo is French (btw,it's identical in Spain,Italy and France,so..

agree  xxxtazdog: you're absolutely right
34 mins
  -> Thank Cindy,for not making a france-spain civil war out of a sandwich ;)

agree  gcaddy: That's what I ask for when someone fetches my lunch!
1 day 7 hrs
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23 mins peer agreement (net): -2
[LEAVE IT AS IT IS]


Explanation:
I say leave it as it is because it is a special type of Spanish sandwich sui generis for which no translation is adequate or really necessary, just as one would not translate pizza, filet mignon, sushi, crepes suzettes, etc. etc. etc. Besides, it gives a chic flavor, so to speak!


    .
DR. RICHARD BAVRY
PRO pts in pair: 94

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  flaviofbg: A pizza is a pizza.An englishman won't have an idea of what a bocadillo is...help him, no?
10 mins
  -> depends on the clientele...a classy guest list will be impressed!

disagree  xxxtazdog: nothing especially
27 mins
  -> I guess the bocadillo is nothing special either then! Call it what you darn well please!
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26 mins
roll


Explanation:
Please see my comments on the first suggestion. French Bread Sandwich is OK but is longer on a menu. Rolls have existed in the English language for at least a century (I'm just about to have lunch so don't have time to look it up!)

Sean Lyle
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 63
Grading comment
Thank you very much to all of you!! All are good options. I have choosen this because it is the one that most suits the context.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: a roll is simply NOT a sandwich
1 min
  -> neither is a bocadillo

agree  Sarah Brenchley: Totally agree - this is the best solution (cheese roll) to distinguish it from the toasted sandwiches with square bread
1 hr
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1 hr peer agreement (net): -2
cocktail canape


Explanation:
Well, well, well... it´s time of armistices... ;)
Here is what I found:

Babylon gives ROLL for bocadillo

Simon and Schuster (my old friends) say that bocadillo is either a SNACK or a COCKTAIL CANAPE.

Hope this helps and that I've been albe to stop a war... :-)))




    See above
Elinor Thomas
Local time: 22:03
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 247

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  flaviofbg: Dear Elinor,is "cocktail canape" two long pieces of french bread with something inside? :)
5 mins
  -> What we know as canape in Argentina is a little piece of bread 2x2cm with something on it, not a sandwich OK? :-)

disagree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: Guess Simon and Schuster, for all their publishing prowess, are no gourmets!
33 mins
  -> I don't know if they are, but as said to Flavio, bocadillo in Argentina is canapé. See my explanation of it to Flavio.

disagree  Sean Lyle: Anyway, what's wrong with a nice little war between friends?
46 mins
  -> As I belong to the hippy generation: MAKE PEACE, NOT WAR! hehehe ;-)

agree  bea0: En Argentina, un bocadillo es un "canape". Sepan algunos colegas que no en todos los países se habla igual!!!!
4 hrs
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1 hr peer agreement (net): -1
Bocadillo sandwich


Explanation:
Why not compromise and call it a 'bocadillo sandwich'?

That way English people will know it is a kind of sandwich, and yet it retains all the exoticism of the Spanish name (with no mention of France :-))

jgal
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: that would be a peccadillo!
29 mins

disagree  Sean Lyle: Is the bocadillo inside the sandwich??
37 mins
  -> is a panini inside a panini sandwich?

disagree  bea0: hahahah a "sandwichillo"...
8 hrs
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1 hr
baguette sandwich


Explanation:
or what Flavio suggested, French bread sandwich.

First of all, Richard: I hit the ENTER key instead of the shift, so my comment was incomplete. I was trying to say that there is nothing especially SPANISH about a bocadillo, it just means that it's on a long loaf of bread instead of on "pan de molde". I apologize for the incomplete comment.)

I have no wish to add fuel to any fires by suggesting yet another French word, but the same as Baguette is commonly used in Spain to refer to a type of long, thin loaf of bread (not exactly the same as a "barra de pan" but similar) it is also understood in English. See the following:

Vegetarian Baguette Sandwich
Egg, Mixed Lettuce, Tomatoes and French Dressing.
$7.20 (http://sydney.citysearch.com.au/E/V/SYDNE/0020/21/29/5.html)

There are lots more if you want to search.

and here's one in support of French bread, for what it's worth.

Bocadillo (sandwich, emparedado). (ENG) French bread sandwich (sandwich); (FRA) Sandwich de baguette (sandwich). (http://personal.redestb.es/doest/b.htm)

BTW, Elinor... S&S is wrong on this one, they are using it as the diminutive of "bocado" rather than the Spanish sandwich.

Talk about much ado about nothing! :-D



    as noted
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 5410

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: I say lets bag it (the war) with baguette. I look forward to the day when McDonald's features a "McBocadillo"! ;>)
21 mins
  -> hey, why not, they already have McPollo!

disagree  bea0: Pero voto por el McBocadillo!!!
8 hrs
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1 hr
Crusty roll


Explanation:
Blood sugar now restored by more than a snack, I reckon that if you put "crusty" in front, you get a more appetising entry in a menu and it reflects the impact of a good bocadillo.

Also, if you use this solution you don't need to add (and misrepresent) the word "sandwich" which for all the ills of supposedly "Anglo-Saxon" cookery, CAN be made to be delicious!

By the way, I was a mile out on the word "roll" - the first reference in the OED is from 1581.

Sean Lyle
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 63

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxtazdog: it's certainly a good option
16 mins

disagree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: That takes a lot of crust!
20 mins
  -> ..or curs't - see yours below!
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1 hr peer agreement (net): -1
stevedore sandwich


Explanation:
If you're writing for a U.S. audience, this is one term for a sandwich that, structurally, consists of hearty fillings laid out on a long crusty loaf of bread bisected along its equator (so to speak; that is, divided into a top and a bottom).

Gastronomic synonyms, with various North American etymologies, include "submarine sandwich," "Hoagie," and "grinder"...

Cheers,
HC (retreating from the crossfire!)

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 17:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 843

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: grudgingly...and cursing like a stevedore!
11 mins
  -> Spoken like, ahem, a Hero...!

disagree  Sean Lyle: Unless it IS exclusively for a US audience,never heard of this term, but (I hate to admit it) it sounds,well, hearty.
19 mins

disagree  BJD: I'm from the U.S. Never heard of a Stevedore sandwich. Sub yes, hoagie yes, grinder a bit less.
1 hr
  -> (to Sean and BJD: It's a Southern California thing...
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3 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Baguette sandwich (bocadillo)


Explanation:
hèhè - compromise proposed by a non-French and a non-Spanish native speaker (who ate a lot of bocadillo's though)...

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 82

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: Hold the mayo! I've had my fill of bocadillos...I can't even "si" straight!
28 mins
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3 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
it can be called a "sub" in America


Explanation:
When I ate "bocadillos" in Spain, they were close the American version of a submarine sandwich

jules123
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: sighted sub, sank same..sank you very much!
16 mins

agree  Pilar T. Bayle
2 hrs
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3 hrs peer agreement (net): -1
filled roll


Explanation:
It could be called a "filled roll" or perhaps a bite to eat


    experience
Thomas Bollmann
Germany
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: I am filled full but not fulfilled!
11 mins
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5 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Bocadillo (boh-cah-dee-yoh)


Explanation:
If this is a Spanish restaurant menu you specially leave it as is and put on the explanation all about how it is made and what the word means (lit. little bite to eat) and so forth. In my native PR the Spanish panaderías make them with a toasted yellow roll, not square like the regular sandwich, and rather small which would merit the name "snack"

Rei
United States
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 59

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: At long last a kindred spirit! Bocadillos and cervezas on me, amigo!
6 hrs
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5 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
NO ESTOY DE ACUERDO CON NINGUNA OPCION DE "SANDWICH"


Explanation:
Un bocadillo NO ES UN SANDWICH. Un sandwich consiste de dos o más rodajas de pan entre las cuales hay un relleno. Un bocadillo, es algo muy diferente.

Un bocadillo, por lo menos en Argentina, es un PEQUEÑO trozo de masa, sobre la cual se agrega algún tipo de mezcla o relleno. (Son como tartas muy pequeñas, SIN TAPA).

También se le llama bocadillo al "canapé", que es lo mismo, pero la base es de pan.

Es IMPRESCINDIBLE que quien pregunta, nos informe si conoce el destino de la traducción.

En este caso en particular, no estoy de acuerdo en dejarlo en castellano, puesto que no es el nombre de una comida. Sería como poner "pie", o "cake", o lo que sea. Si no se especifica de qué son, de qué están rellenas, o qué sabor tienen, no tiene sentido.





bea0
United States
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 65

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elinor Thomas: BIEN BEA!!!! Argentina 1 - Resto of the World 0, jajaja
1 hr
  -> :)

agree  Cynthia Brals-Rud: Vamos, vamos, :-)
2 hrs
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10 hrs
Un comentario...


Explanation:
Evidentemente, en España se denominan de una forma y en Argentina, de otra.

En mi respuesta anterior, me referí a lo que significa bocadillo en Argentina. Pero acabo de leer en el diccionario de María Moliner, que bocadillo,en inglés, es sandwich....

En conclusión, es IMPRESCINDIBLE que sepamos a qué país va dirigido el texto.

Si a un sandwich se lo denomina "bocadillo" (una palabra en DIMINUTIVO), ya sé lo que no debo pedir cuando esté por España...digo...para no quedarme con hambre....!


bea0
United States
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 65
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10 hrs
Mil disculpas, pero falta un pequeño detalle...


Explanation:
...que puede dilucidar nuestras dudas.

Si este término va a aparecer en un menú (al gual que la palabra sandwich), no puedo creer que no especifique nada más...de qué tipo, con qué relleno, etc.

Es como si pareciera la palabra "salad" y no especificara de qué.

Nakota, si pides que diferencemos "bocadillo" de "sandwich", al menos aparecerá qué tipo de sandwhiches incluye, y qué tipo de bocadillos. Eso puede ayudar a poder distinguirlos en tu texto...

Si es posible, también informanos a qué país va dirigido el menú, pues como se puede desprender de todas las sugerencias, el significado varía entre diferentes países de habla hispana.

bea0
United States
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 65
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1 day 2 hrs
SORRY


Explanation:
Hello:
Sorry to all for this incovenience about "Bocadillo" and "Sandwich". I don't give more information, because it is just the difference between "Bocadillo " and "Sandwich". The publick to which it goes is both US and UK. I am writing from Spain.
So I has nothing to do with a "Canapé" from Argentina (But thank you very much for the argentinians that have answered me).
Bocadillo in Spanish is: "un barra de pan a la que se le puede poner cualquier cosas, ya sea jamón serrano, lomo, queso, etc" y un "Sandwich" normalmente se hace de jamón york y queso, aunque también hay vegetal.
The diference is that the "Bocadillo" is done with a different bread than the sandwich. Those who have visited Spain or know Spain, know the difference between the two kind of breads.
Anyway after all this explation, THANK YOU VERY MUCH TO ALL WHO HAVE ANSWERED ME!!!!!!
I didn't expect the term "Bocadillo" to cause all this incovenience.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH AGAIN!
And If somebody wants to make any other suggestion, it is welcome.


nakota
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