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horterada

English translation: tacky, gaudy

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:horterada
English translation:tacky, gaudy
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04:51 Jul 25, 2001
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: horterada
¡cómo se viste, ese! ¡vaya horterada!
Bill
How tacky!!!
Explanation:
Hi Bill!
In Spain (familiar or colloquial) "horterada" means "tacky" or in bad taste. You might translate it as something like "He dresses with such bad taste...how tacky"

Hope this helps:-)
terry
Selected response from:

Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 21:36
Grading comment
I'd agree with "tacky", it is the first to come to mind and the best for general use. However, Marie's "gaudy" would often be right ... in my sentence above it'd do fine. Interesting that, about Gaudi, ¿verdad? :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4tacky, gaudyEDRD
na +3How tacky!!!
Terry Burgess
na +1I'd go along with "such bad taste".
Parrot
natastelessness
Thomas Bollmann
naLook what he's wearing! How gaudy!
marie ryan


  

Answers


28 mins
tastelessness


Explanation:
none needed


    Pons, Langenscheidt
Thomas Bollmann
Germany
Local time: 04:36
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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29 mins peer agreement (net): +3
How tacky!!!


Explanation:
Hi Bill!
In Spain (familiar or colloquial) "horterada" means "tacky" or in bad taste. You might translate it as something like "He dresses with such bad taste...how tacky"

Hope this helps:-)
terry


    Oxford Superlex
Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 21:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2372
Grading comment
I'd agree with "tacky", it is the first to come to mind and the best for general use. However, Marie's "gaudy" would often be right ... in my sentence above it'd do fine. Interesting that, about Gaudi, ¿verdad? :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxtazdog: that's it!
7 mins
  -> Thx Cindy:-)

agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY
2 hrs
  -> Thx Dr.:-)

agree  Patricia Lutteral: Esta es la idea :-)
2 hrs
  -> Thx Pat:-)
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4 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
I'd go along with "such bad taste".


Explanation:
It's a bit more than being tacky, because tackiness implies a certain insouciance... The person who commits a horterada actually THINKS HE'S PRETTY SLICK for doing it! (As in plastic leopard-skin trenchcoats and the like).

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 04:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Esperanza Cortez
1 hr
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2 days 6 hrs
Look what he's wearing! How gaudy!


Explanation:
'gaudy' could be another alternative and interstingly enough derived from the Spanish architect Gaudí, reknowned for his beautiful, almost over-the-top architcture. Unfortunately 'gaudy' has taken on a pejorative meaning in English, unfairly so, I feel, after seeing his wonderful works of art!!

marie ryan
Local time: 04:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 11
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324 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
tacky, gaudy


Explanation:
I agree, are suitable for horterada.
I'm not at all sure about the origin of Gaudy having anything to do with Gaudi, though...

I was intrigued by this and went to the The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000
GAUDY:
ETYMOLOGY: Possibly from gaudy2 (influenced by gaud).

SYNONYMS: gaudy1, flashy, garish, loud, meretricious, tawdry These adjectives mean tastelessly showy: a gaudy costume; a flashy ring; garish colors; a loud sport shirt; a meretricious yet stylish book; tawdry ornaments.

Gaudy2: Inflected forms: pl. gaud·ies
Chiefly British A feast, especially an annual university dinner.
ETYMOLOGY: Middle English gaudi, gaud, prank, trick, possibly from Old French gaudie, merriment (from gaudir, to enjoy, make merry, from Latin gaudre, to rejoice)and from Latin gaudium, enjoyment, merry-making (from gaudre, to rejoice; see gu- in Appendix I).

Gaud: NOUN: A gaudy or showy ornament or trinket.
ETYMOLOGY: Middle English gaud, gaudi, sing. of gaudies, large, ornamental beads on a rosary, trinkets, from Medieval Latin gaudia, from Latin, pl. of gaudium, joy (referring to the Joyful Mysteries of the Virgin Mary), from gaudre, to rejoice. See gu- in Appendix I.


I don't know...

EDRD
Local time: 04:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 7
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