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policial

English translation: authoritarian

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:policial
English translation:authoritarian
Entered by: Greg Hunt
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16:47 Dec 24, 2010
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Philosophy
Spanish term or phrase: policial
This is from an essay written by a Spanish art historian-cum-philosopher-cum-politician. It's quite involved with numerous technical uses of normally relatively innocuous terms, meaning that I am very often having to resort to literal translation, more than I usually do.

This particular term appears several times, but here are a couple of examples:

"Y, conveniente es subrayarlo, no hay nada más normativo y *policial*que el acto de fundar un lugar, de codificarlo y de otorgarle unos límites en función de un básico sistema de aceptación/exclusión."

"Es indudable, a este respecto, que, después del 11 – S, el miedo se ha convertido en el principal creador de comunidades. De hecho, las sociedades contemporáneas, sin excepción, se hallan articuladas en torno a la idea de la “catástrofe inminente”; y es este sentimiento angustioso, asfixiante, el que posibilita la transformación del miedo en el mayor medio de gestión *policial* de la sociedad."

"Si se parte del supuesto de que la arquitectura “monumental” es huella, de suyo irá el obtener como conclusión que lo arquitectónico funciona, en estos casos, como una “marca de autoridad” –en el doble sentido, además, de “autor” y de *“policial”*."

"Police" doesn't really work (certainly not in the first case anyway) and I've thought about a few options (tyrannical, surveillance-society, dictatorial, controlling) without being convinced by any of them.

The author sets great store by the French philospher Alain Badiou, so if there are any connoisseurs of his work here (unlikely on Xmas Eve, I know) this may be right up your street.
Greg Hunt
Spain
Local time: 06:29
authoritarian
Explanation:
From the Oxford:

authoritarian
■ adjective favouring or enforcing strict obedience to authority at the expense of personal freedom.

Does this more or less fit the bill?
Selected response from:

Simon Bruni
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:29
Grading comment
Great answer. Cheers Simon and thanks to everyone else as well.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3authoritarian
Simon Bruni
3(1) there is nothing more normative, nothing that encourages public order more than....Bubo Coromandus
2Orwellian
Anahí Seri
Summary of reference entries provided
policial in English
Charles Davis

  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Orwellian


Explanation:
just one more idea!

Anahí Seri
Spain
Local time: 06:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in SpanishSpanish
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38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
authoritarian


Explanation:
From the Oxford:

authoritarian
■ adjective favouring or enforcing strict obedience to authority at the expense of personal freedom.

Does this more or less fit the bill?

Simon Bruni
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Great answer. Cheers Simon and thanks to everyone else as well.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  fionn: Just what I was going to put - fits the last example even better than the original with the play on author-authoritarian! Hope 'fit the bill' was a pun... groan;)
14 mins

agree  franglish
3 hrs

agree  Charles Davis
5 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
(1) there is nothing more normative, nothing that encourages public order more than....


Explanation:
(2) means of managing society in a way that encourages public order

(3) in the double sense, moreover, of "author" and of "that which encourages public order"

Bubo Coromandus
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52
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Reference comments


6 hrs
Reference: policial in English

Reference information:
I think Simon's suggestion of "authoritarian" is the best option here. However, I just wanted to mention an alternative that I've considered but decided not to put forward as an answer: "policial".

Obviously policial is a very rare word in English, but it is not unprecedented: Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary of 1913 lists it, with the definition “relating to the police”.

The writer is using "policial" here in a way that is reminiscent of how Badiou, and more particularly Jacques Rancière, use "policier", notably in the expression "l'ordre policier". This tends to be rendered in English as "police order". To get an idea of what Rancière means by this, see Gabriel Rockhill's translation of Le Partage du sensible, as The Politics of Aesthetics, glossary, p. 89:

"Police or Police Order (La Police or L'Ordre policier)
As the general law that determines the distribution of parts and roles in a community as well as its forms of exclusion, the police is first and foremost an organization of 'bodies' based on a communal 'distribution of the sensible', i.e. a system of coordinates defining modes of being, doing, making, and communicating that establishes the borders between the visible and the invisible, the audible and the inaudible, the sayable and the unsayable".

In a more technical philosophical text than this, I think an English-speaking academic commentator might well consider using the adjective "policial", to signal that this sense of "policier" is being invoked. Without wishing to sound too irreverent, for many writers of this kind it is not only acceptable for their prose not to sound like everyday English; it is a positive advantage.

However, this is not really a technical text, and so I think it would be too forced. But here are a couple of examples to show that the usage is not totally unknown:

“Nor is the problem confined [...] to the historial event or intervention, nor to sabotaging the entire state of affairs, the state regime or policial order of memory that requires that this excess knowledge or “knowing too much” be repressed”
Tom Cohen, Hitchcock’s Cryptonymies: War Machines
http://books.google.es/books?id=DaJVzVM0c1oC&pg=PA60&lpg=PA6...
(Note “historial event” here, by the way: not the same thing as historical.)

Bruce’s departure from Gotham was a result of his trauma, and his new mission to fight crime upon his return links his future as Batman to his past as traumatized Bruce Wayne. In other words, the link operates entirely within Bruce’s psychic economy, and not in an objective criminal or policial order.
“Bruce Wayne’s Traumatic Past and Batman’s New History: Ego-Ideal and Ideal Ego in the Batman Origin Myth”, Honors Thesis http://www.honors.ufl.edu/webapps/thesis/GetThesis.aspx?FID=...

Happy Christmas, everyone!

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Note added at 8 hrs (2010-12-25 00:50:27 GMT)
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PS. I assume it is obvious that when Rancière and others refer to "police" in this special sense, as in the paragraph quoted above, they're not talking about the actual police force, which Rancière calls the "basse police".

Charles Davis
Spain
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56
Note to reference poster
Asker: Excellent note this - I was in two minds about whether to go for your suggestion in the end. Indeed, Rancière is also mentioned in the text, which demonstrates that you know what you're talking about!

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