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catatronías

English translation: catachronic

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:catatronías
English translation:catachronic
Entered by: Charles Davis
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22:29 Nov 19, 2013
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Philosophy
Spanish term or phrase: catatronías
This is a text about a contemporary Argentine artist:

Una cifra privada, de aquellas que habilitan los juegos temporales en las discronías y catatronías.

Thanks
Wendy Gosselin
Local time: 14:29
catachronic
Explanation:
This has got to be a typo; "catatronía" is not only unattested anywhere but doesn't make any sense etymologically. And I am sure that Rachel and Jim are right and that it should be "catacronías", not "catatonías". Catatonia doesn't fit the context at all, but since the sentence is about "juegos temporales", and we've already had "discronías", another "–cronía" word, referring to time, is very plausible.

As Jim says, "catachronie", though not exactly common, is a perfectly well established term in French. So although catacronía is unattested in Spanish, at least in Google, it has to be that, probably borrowed from French (or possibly Italian, where it's also found).

(All these points can be easily confirmed by Google searches.)

However, thinking about how to render the sentence as a whole, I think it would be much better to use adjectives than nouns for these terms. So instead of "dyschronies and catachronies", you would use "dyschronic and catachronic". In fact, although "catacronía" doesn't occur anywhere else in Spanish, "catacrónico" is found in a few places:
https://www.google.es/search?num=100&espv=210&es_sm=93&q="ca...

In English, similarly, "catachony/catachronies" is virtually non-existent, but "catachronic" is occasionally found, as in this master's thesis entitled "Time, Art and Resistance: Visual Art Programs in Prisons"; it also mentions "catachrony" (being "under time"), citing the American theorist Victor Gioscia:

"Gioscia (1971) describes the 'catachronic' individual as being in a mental prison, one for whom time weighs heavily, and who - not incidentally - has frequent recourse to narcotics in order to escape, momentarily, this condition. For the person suffering from catachrony, the 'epichronic' realm presents an attractive escape"
https://circle.ubc.ca/bitstream/handle/2429/5874/ubc_1997-01...

Gioscia uses the word several times in his Varieties of Temporal Experience, 1: Time Forms:
http://books.google.es/books?hl=es&id=PS4iAAAAMAAJ&focus=sea...

So I would suggest you put something like "dyschronic and catachronic temporal games" or "playing with time in a dyschronic and catachronic way". It would work better like that than with nouns, in my opinion.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2013-11-20 11:51:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The alternative adjectival form "catachronistic" (contrasted with "anachronistic") is also found, as here:
http://www.utexas.edu/law/conferences/representingculture/Pa... (p. 15)

But "dyschronistic" is not used (or hardly ever), whereas "dyschronic" is reasonably common, generally in medical contexts. It would sound much better to use two terms of a similar form: "dyschronic and catachronic", rather than "dyschronic and catachronistic".
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 19:29
Grading comment
thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1catachronic
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
catachronic


Explanation:
This has got to be a typo; "catatronía" is not only unattested anywhere but doesn't make any sense etymologically. And I am sure that Rachel and Jim are right and that it should be "catacronías", not "catatonías". Catatonia doesn't fit the context at all, but since the sentence is about "juegos temporales", and we've already had "discronías", another "–cronía" word, referring to time, is very plausible.

As Jim says, "catachronie", though not exactly common, is a perfectly well established term in French. So although catacronía is unattested in Spanish, at least in Google, it has to be that, probably borrowed from French (or possibly Italian, where it's also found).

(All these points can be easily confirmed by Google searches.)

However, thinking about how to render the sentence as a whole, I think it would be much better to use adjectives than nouns for these terms. So instead of "dyschronies and catachronies", you would use "dyschronic and catachronic". In fact, although "catacronía" doesn't occur anywhere else in Spanish, "catacrónico" is found in a few places:
https://www.google.es/search?num=100&espv=210&es_sm=93&q="ca...

In English, similarly, "catachony/catachronies" is virtually non-existent, but "catachronic" is occasionally found, as in this master's thesis entitled "Time, Art and Resistance: Visual Art Programs in Prisons"; it also mentions "catachrony" (being "under time"), citing the American theorist Victor Gioscia:

"Gioscia (1971) describes the 'catachronic' individual as being in a mental prison, one for whom time weighs heavily, and who - not incidentally - has frequent recourse to narcotics in order to escape, momentarily, this condition. For the person suffering from catachrony, the 'epichronic' realm presents an attractive escape"
https://circle.ubc.ca/bitstream/handle/2429/5874/ubc_1997-01...

Gioscia uses the word several times in his Varieties of Temporal Experience, 1: Time Forms:
http://books.google.es/books?hl=es&id=PS4iAAAAMAAJ&focus=sea...

So I would suggest you put something like "dyschronic and catachronic temporal games" or "playing with time in a dyschronic and catachronic way". It would work better like that than with nouns, in my opinion.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2013-11-20 11:51:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The alternative adjectival form "catachronistic" (contrasted with "anachronistic") is also found, as here:
http://www.utexas.edu/law/conferences/representingculture/Pa... (p. 15)

But "dyschronistic" is not used (or hardly ever), whereas "dyschronic" is reasonably common, generally in medical contexts. It would sound much better to use two terms of a similar form: "dyschronic and catachronic", rather than "dyschronic and catachronistic".

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 19:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56
Grading comment
thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Fell
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rachel :)

neutral  Karen Vincent-Jones: I do not think this term would be comprehensible to an English-speaking reader.
6 hrs
  -> Quite possibly not, but that is not an adequate reason for not using it in my opinion. See discussion.
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Changes made by editors
Nov 24, 2013 - Changes made by Charles Davis:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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