sarampión juvenil

English translation: just a phase

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:sarampión juvenil
English translation:just a phase
Entered by: Charles Davis
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23:22 Jun 18, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Spanish term or phrase: sarampión juvenil
sarampión juvenil
This expression alludes to some activity done by young people, usually as a sign of rebellion, and probably disapproved of by the speaker using the expression.
Example of use:
“El compromiso de los intelectuales con el anarquismo en algunos casos fue de corta duración y se circunscribió a los primeros años de su actividad literaria; de ahí, que se calificase esa relación como de un “sarampión juvenil”. Tal fue el caso de Julio Camba, José Martínez Ruiz (el futuro Azorín), Eduardo Marquina, Roberto Novoa Santos. Félix B. Basterra, etc. Otros mantuvieron un compromiso de por vida, como fue el caso de Tolstoi, Alberto Ghiraldo, González Pacheco o Manuel González Prada, aunque la identificación de éste último con la acracia fue tardía.”
(http://e-spacio.uned.es/fez/eserv/tesisuned:CiencPolSoc-Jama...
------------END OF QUOTATION------------

What do you call this in English?
Many thanks in advance
Manuel Cedeño Berrueta
Local time: 07:37
just a phase
Explanation:
I don't think you can use this for every instance of "sarampión juvenil", a set phrase in Spanish, but "just a phase" is itself a set phrase and I think it fits your context. It's virtually always applied to teenagers. It's something adults say about typical behaviour or activity of young people, particularly but not only rebelliousness, and it combines some of the main elements of the Spanish expression: a patronising expression used by adults about typical but usually short-lived youthful behaviour: something they "catch", like measles, but grow out of, just as they recover from measles.

"It’s just a phase: Four overused, hateful words.
[...]
Oh, it’s just a phase. You’ll grow out of it."
https://joannadw.wordpress.com/2011/06/17/548/


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-06-19 02:22:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is important to give the actual context, because the way you translate a phrase of this kind can vary. However, I think the answer I've suggested would also work for the text you've now quoted in the discussion area:

"Sólo el tiempo dirá si esto fue el comienzo de una primavera tipo Praga o simplemente un sarampión juvenil.”

"Only time will tell whether this was the beginning of a Prague spring or just a phase."

However, I would consider other alternatives here: "just a passing phase", perhaps, or something different like "just youthful high spirits".

The point is that we don't have a set expression exactly equivalent to "sarampión juvenil" in English, so each case will need to be assessed on its merits.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:37
Grading comment
Thanks a million to all of you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6just a phase
Charles Davis
4 +1kids' measles
Robin Levey
4 +1an outbreak of youthful exuberance
neilmac
3juveniles illness
Chema Nieto Castañón


Discussion entries: 12





  

Answers


56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
kids' measles


Explanation:
The ST is suggesting that rebellion is one of the defining characteristics of "youth" - in the same way as all "youths" (kids) get measles (well, they did when I was 50 years younger than I am today ...).

que se calificase esa relación como de un “sarampión juvenil”.
-->
[this rebelliousness] is really no different to kids' measles.

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 07:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  James A. Walsh: On reflection of your discussion entry, and considering that real "measles" context, I'm now thinking it could be along the lines of "or just another case of 'kiddie measles'" (in quotation marks). It really needs accurate research though.
1 day 21 hrs
  -> Yes, I agree, "in quotes" would be useful, to encourage the reader to think about what (s)he's reading "in context".
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
juveniles illness


Explanation:
Same idea as Charles, just expressed a little more "bitterly";
... (their adscription to anarchism) was described as a juvenile illness


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2018-06-19 00:57:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Odio el corrector de mi telefono; juvenile (not juveniles).
Sorry! ;)

Chema Nieto Castañón
Spain
Local time: 13:37
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
just a phase


Explanation:
I don't think you can use this for every instance of "sarampión juvenil", a set phrase in Spanish, but "just a phase" is itself a set phrase and I think it fits your context. It's virtually always applied to teenagers. It's something adults say about typical behaviour or activity of young people, particularly but not only rebelliousness, and it combines some of the main elements of the Spanish expression: a patronising expression used by adults about typical but usually short-lived youthful behaviour: something they "catch", like measles, but grow out of, just as they recover from measles.

"It’s just a phase: Four overused, hateful words.
[...]
Oh, it’s just a phase. You’ll grow out of it."
https://joannadw.wordpress.com/2011/06/17/548/


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-06-19 02:22:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is important to give the actual context, because the way you translate a phrase of this kind can vary. However, I think the answer I've suggested would also work for the text you've now quoted in the discussion area:

"Sólo el tiempo dirá si esto fue el comienzo de una primavera tipo Praga o simplemente un sarampión juvenil.”

"Only time will tell whether this was the beginning of a Prague spring or just a phase."

However, I would consider other alternatives here: "just a passing phase", perhaps, or something different like "just youthful high spirits".

The point is that we don't have a set expression exactly equivalent to "sarampión juvenil" in English, so each case will need to be assessed on its merits.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 252
Grading comment
Thanks a million to all of you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chema Nieto Castañón: Yes, that is the idea; if only, the original is particularly funny and aggressive (quite insulting in fact). It reminds me of "Si no eres comunista a los 20 es que eres tonto; si lo sigues siendo a los 40 es que eres gilipollas"// :) ENG version is nicer!
8 mins
  -> Thanks, Chema :-) There's a fairly similar saying in English: "Any man who is not a socialist at age 20 has no heart. Any man who is still a socialist at age 40 has no head" (various versions exist; attributed to Clemenceau or Churchill).

agree  lorenab23: Yes, I was thinking "passing trend", but "just a phase" captures the "juvenil" concept. Un abrazo!
26 mins
  -> Thanks, Lorena :-) ¡Un abrazo!

neutral  Robin Levey: Spoon-feeding. Why limit the translation to your "inference" (that it's "just a phase"), rather then leaving the reader to draw his/her own inference, based on their own understanding of "measles" in the context of a young person's experience?
50 mins
  -> Because "sarampión juvenil" is a set phrase but "kids'/youthful measles" isn't. It's not a translation equivalent and creates an effect alien to the source text. The inference is not mine; it's inherent in the Spanish expression.

agree  Marie Wilson: Another example of where literal doesn't work. Your "just youthful high spirits" sounds good.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks very much, Marie :-)

agree  Carol Gullidge: or possibly "(an epidemic of) growing pains" - retaining some of the allusions of the ST metaphor
8 hrs
  -> Many thanks, Carol :-) That's a brilliant suggestion.

agree  Toni Castano: A temporary phase? Not sure if "illness" can work in English in a figurative sense.
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Toni :-) I can't quite think of a way of making it work with "illness". A temporary phase would be fine, I think; but "just a phase", tal cual, is the real cliché: something parents say and teenagers hate (see ref.).

agree  James A. Walsh: "Just a passing phase" gets my vote ;-) / It's James Walsh, just noticed that ProZ changed what displays in my profile from my real name to my account username! Dunno what that's all about?!
16 hrs
  -> I can live with that ;-) Thanks a lot! (There's something vaguely familiar about that walking figure...) // I thought so! These things are a complete mystery to me. But I quite like greeney :-)
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
an outbreak of youthful exuberance


Explanation:
"Outbreak" sort of keeps the measles notion without actually naming the disease, so this might work....

Or how about "an excess of youthful zeal"...?

Example sentence(s):
  • ... the Beatles' visit to Australia in 1963 and the outbreak of youthful exuberance that accompanied i

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/cricket/2332071/Moment-of-truth-for-England.html
neilmac
Spain
Local time: 13:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 87

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chema Nieto Castañón: I like this one also; an outbreak of youthful exuberance, although a bit "flowered" maybe, it fits well with the intended meaning of the original text.
46 mins
  -> Flowered is as flowered does :-)
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