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calluna vulgaris, erica cinerea, erica vagans

English translation: More heather

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20:07 Nov 24, 2001
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Science
Spanish term or phrase: calluna vulgaris, erica cinerea, erica vagans
experiment with this type of plant
jodi
English translation:More heather
Explanation:
Here is some better information than the links I gave before:

Calluna vulgaris:
Normally Calluna has slightly fleshy linear leaves 2mm (1/10in) long in opposite and closely overlapping pairs, usually dark green becoming purplish in winter. However the species is very variable, from prostrate, 5 x 45cm (2 x 18in), to erect and spreading 60 x 75cm (24 x 30in) with leaves ranging in colour from dark green to bright green, grey, yellow, orange and red which can be glabrous or hairy. The flowering time varies; in the northern part of the distribution it blooms from June to August, whilst in the southern part of the distribution it blooms from August to November. The white to crimson flowers, held usually in one-sided racemes, are normally single with the corolla in four oblong petals, 3mm (1/8in) long, overlapped by a calyx of similar size and colour. Double and bud-flowering forms also exist and generally flower later. It is an important garden plant providing colour throughout the year.

Erica cinerea
An evergreen compact shrub from western Norway, UK, France, northern Spain and Portugal. It has also naturalised on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, USA. Reaching 35cm (14in) in height and spreading to 80cm (32in), it usually has leaves which are dark bottle green, linear and strongly revolute. The bell-shaped flowers of white, pink or purple are borne in profusion from early summer to early autumn.

Erica vagans
A species of evergreen shrub native to the Lizard peninsula in Cornwall, England, Brittany and south west France and northern Spain. They grow to 50cm (20in) and spread to 80cm (32in) with linear, dark green leaves and small, campanulate, pink, mauve or white flowers held in cylindrical racemes from mid-summer to mid-autumn.




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GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 23:20
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Summary of answers provided
5 +2More heather
GoodWords
5Heather
GoodWords
4Heather/Common Heather/Ling - Bell Heather - Cornish Heath
Sheila Hardie
4These are scientific names,xxxmgonzalez


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
These are scientific names,


Explanation:
so they're in Latin, not Spanish. Sorry, can´t help you. I'm not a botanist, which is what you need.

xxxmgonzalez
PRO pts in pair: 44
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Heather


Explanation:
Actually, these are not Spanish at all, but Latin (botanical) names for different kinds of heather.


    Reference: http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/heather/speciesFrame.html
    Reference: http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/heather/choosing.html
GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 23:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1449
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
More heather


Explanation:
Here is some better information than the links I gave before:

Calluna vulgaris:
Normally Calluna has slightly fleshy linear leaves 2mm (1/10in) long in opposite and closely overlapping pairs, usually dark green becoming purplish in winter. However the species is very variable, from prostrate, 5 x 45cm (2 x 18in), to erect and spreading 60 x 75cm (24 x 30in) with leaves ranging in colour from dark green to bright green, grey, yellow, orange and red which can be glabrous or hairy. The flowering time varies; in the northern part of the distribution it blooms from June to August, whilst in the southern part of the distribution it blooms from August to November. The white to crimson flowers, held usually in one-sided racemes, are normally single with the corolla in four oblong petals, 3mm (1/8in) long, overlapped by a calyx of similar size and colour. Double and bud-flowering forms also exist and generally flower later. It is an important garden plant providing colour throughout the year.

Erica cinerea
An evergreen compact shrub from western Norway, UK, France, northern Spain and Portugal. It has also naturalised on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, USA. Reaching 35cm (14in) in height and spreading to 80cm (32in), it usually has leaves which are dark bottle green, linear and strongly revolute. The bell-shaped flowers of white, pink or purple are borne in profusion from early summer to early autumn.

Erica vagans
A species of evergreen shrub native to the Lizard peninsula in Cornwall, England, Brittany and south west France and northern Spain. They grow to 50cm (20in) and spread to 80cm (32in) with linear, dark green leaves and small, campanulate, pink, mauve or white flowers held in cylindrical racemes from mid-summer to mid-autumn.







    Reference: http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/heather/heather_family.html
GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 23:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1449
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Karla Mabarak
1 hr

agree  Dr. Aros: Very good!
1 hr
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Heather/Common Heather/Ling - Bell Heather - Cornish Heath


Explanation:
They are all species of the family Ericaceae. Calluna vulgaris is generally known as Heather, Common Heather or Ling. Erica cinerea is normally called Bell Heather and Erica vagans is know as Cornish Heath or Wandering Heath. By the way, the scientific names should be written in italics or underlined and the first name (the genus) should have a capital letter). I don't know how to write in italics here!

I hope this helps. See the references below for more information and photos.

Sheila



http://www.ulstermuseum.org.uk/flora/default.htm?item=3902

Calluna vulgaris Ericaceae Heather



A low-growing shrubby species which is the commonest of all the heather species and which is found in acid and especially peaty soils all across Northern Ireland. The habitats include old leached sand dunes, lowland heaths, raised and blanket bogs, woodland and forestry plantations. It occurs from sea level to high up in the mountains and hills and frequently grows covering very large areas as the dominant species. It is adversely affected by over-grazing by sheep which can result in its replacement by a species-poor grassland on the hills.

Calluna is distinguished from other heathers (Erica spp.) by having separate petals, instead of a tubular or urn-like flower of fused petals. It is frequently accompanied by Erica spp. and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus).


http://www.ulstermuseum.org.uk/flora/default.htm?item=3909


Erica cinerea Ericaceae Bell Heather



One of the three common heathers of mountain blanket bog, lowland raised bog or acidic ground near the coast.

Close-up of flower

10 km square distribution map






http://www.ulstermuseum.org.uk/flora/default.htm?item=3913

Erica vagans Ericaceae Cornish Heath



The English name is Cornish Heath because its main area of occurrence in the British Isles is the Lizard Peninsula in Cornwall. It does occur in Ireland at two sites - one on the dunes at Murlough in County Down, where it is certainly a garden escape (it is a popular garden plant), and one in County Fermanagh not far from Belcoo, where it may be native. It grows with other heathers, and flowers about July ~ August. Outside the British Isles it is restricted to Spain and France.

List of protected species in Northern Ireland








http://www.ulstermuseum.org.uk/flora/ericacea.htm

Species of EricaceaeSpecies list for Ericaceae
Rhododendron ponticum L. Rhododendron
Andromeda polifolia L. Bog-rosemary
Gaultheria shallon Pursh Shallon
Arbutus unedo L. Strawberry-tree
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Sprengel Bearberry
Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull Heather
Erica tetralix L. Cross-leaved Heath
Erica terminalis Salisb. Corsican Heath
Erica cinerea L. Bell Heather
Erica vagans L. Cornish Heath
Vaccinium oxycoccos L. Cranberry
Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. Cowberry
Vaccinium myrtillus L. Bilberry

[Family List] [Major Groups] [Home Page]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.heathsandheathers.com/care/page3.html


The Heather Specialists


Growing Heathers in
Cold Climates
The following was written for you by Donald Mackay, editor of the North American Heather Society bulletin Heather News. 
Although some "not-quite-so-hardy" heaths often appear in books about the hardy heaths, it is clear from a map of the natural distribution of European heaths that Calluna vulgaris--the Scotch Heather- is the most widespread and northerly of them all, that Erica tetralix (bog heather) and Erica cinerea (bell heather) are less able to move inland from the moderation influence of the Atlantic Ocean, and that Erica carnea occupies the alpine ground of Central Europe.  The other not-quite-so-hardy ericas are found naturally in the warm southwest of England or west of Ireland or around the Mediterranean sea.  As expected, Erica vagans, Erica ciliaris, Erica erigena, Erica mackaiana and the hybrids they form (E. x williamsii, x watsonii, x praegeri, x darleyensis) are generally less likely to survive a hard winter than the alpine Erica carnea or the northern plants, i.e., Scotch Heather, bog heather, bell heather trio.
In terms of simple survival ability, the not probably go to Erica carnea, but at a price.  Practically speaking, the New England garden does best under extreme conditions with Calluna vulgaris, followed by Erica tetralix with Erica cinerea a poor third.  Each of these species may be available in large numbers of cultivars.  In such large numbers, a wide range of winter hardiness is to be found, and much overlapping, so that even among Calluna vulgaris, there are some cultivars whose southern origin can be a big impediment to Canadian, New England or Midwest gardening.
The biggest enemy for heather gardening is extreme cold (20 degrees of frost or more).  The biggest friend is snow.  The most important question for you is does the period of deepest snow you get in winter overlap the periods of deepest frosts?
In Vermont ski country, with a continuous snow cover all winter from two to four feet deep, Calluna vulgaris is perfectly safe.  Erica carnea is also safe, but by thetime the snow cover has thawed, it may have finished its blooming unseen, often bleached in color, under the snow.  Even in snow country one can get the January thaw, but this will affect Erica tetralix and Erica cinerea much more than Calluna vulgaris, usually by splitting their stems whch, while it does not kill the plant, does drastically cut back on the bloom in summer. 
If you live in more civilized parts of New England like the Connecticut River Valley, the snow cover is less reliable, or persistent, and tend to disappear long before the cold night frosts allow the ground to warm up.  Under these conditions, W. Dickey grows heathers successfully using a combination of sloping bank to spill the frost Reemay®, porous synthetic cloth, to cover the ericas, pine needles and branches over everything, and special attention paid to drainage of the more cold-susceptible heathers.  He finds that digging lots of sand into the ground under the plant seems to work well.  The pine needles and Reemay® (this can be called Harvest Guard and is widely available) come off gradually in spring so that the carnea blooms can be seen, while the callunas remain shielded from bright sun and cold dehydrating winds so long as their roots are imbedded in the frozen ground.  It is also important to avoid alternate freezing and thawing in fall, and especially spring, which leads to frost heaved

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/default.asp

The lowland heaths that remain support a large number of species that are unique to the habitat. Typically, the heathland community is dominated by the heathers, five of which are native to mainland Britain (common heather Calluna vulgaris, cross-leaved heath Erica tetralix, bell heather Erica cinerea, Dorset heath Erica ciliaris and Cornish heath Erica vagans). A range of specialised plants grow amongst the heather, including scarcer species such as the marsh gentian Gentiana pneumonanthe and the carnivorous pale butterwort Pinguicula lusitanica. Wet heath and valley mires generally show greater diversity than dry heath and are of considerable botanical interest.


    I am Scottish - and grew up amongst the heather!
Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 06:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1355
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