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LA DIRECCIÓN NORMAL AL PLANO DE ESQUISTOSIDAD

English translation: perpendicular, normal

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:normal
English translation:perpendicular, normal
Entered by: xxxLia Fail
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14:42 Mar 24, 2001
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Science
Spanish term or phrase: LA DIRECCIÓN NORMAL AL PLANO DE ESQUISTOSIDAD
La resolución con la que se trabaja (1 metro), viene de una parte por la necesidad de no perder mucha exactitud en la transformación. En el caso que nos ocupa, más del 92% de los tramos continuos de pizarra útil tienen una longitud superior a un metro, representando el 99% de la longitud total acumulada de pizarra útil. Por otro lado, en mina se exige un espesor mínimo de bloque del orden de cincuenta centímetros; como el espesor viene dado en LA DIRECCIÓN NORMAL AL PLANO DE ESQUISTOSIDAD QUE BUZA 60º, el soporte puede considerarse representativo del tamaño mínimo de bloque en dicha dirección.

GEOSTATISTICS: I can't figure out what preposition, if any to use for NORMAL AL PLANO, and even so the sentence sounds very Spanglish if translated literally. Any ideas what is meant and/or a translation? Thanks.
xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 15:10
normal to the plane...
Explanation:
In math and physics, "normal" is the jargon-equivalent of "perpendicular."

Out of consideration for your readers, you could say, perfectly properly, "perpendicular to the [schistose] plane..." (or "...the plane in which the schistose (or slate) layer (or stratum) lies...," etc.).

Cheers,
HC

Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 06:10
Grading comment
Thanks, that makes sense
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naperpendicular to the planar schistosity
Yolanda Broad
nanormal to the plane...Heathcliff


  

Answers


28 mins
normal to the plane...


Explanation:
In math and physics, "normal" is the jargon-equivalent of "perpendicular."

Out of consideration for your readers, you could say, perfectly properly, "perpendicular to the [schistose] plane..." (or "...the plane in which the schistose (or slate) layer (or stratum) lies...," etc.).

Cheers,
HC



Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 06:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 843
Grading comment
Thanks, that makes sense
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs
perpendicular to the planar schistosity


Explanation:
After doing a whole lot of Google searches, it looks like what you need in English is "planar." rather than "plane." Then the rest should fall into place.

Found the following on Google, at
FM 5-410 Chptr 2 Structural Geology
... of cleavages and schistosity can be mapped ... the attitudes of planar rock units or ... plane along a line on a map ... Reverse. Thrust. Normal and Reverse (see A and B ...
www.adtdl.army.mil/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/fm/5-410/ch2.htm

It should help explain what you are translating. Here are a few excerpts, to whet your appetite:

Normal faults are faults along which the hanging wall has been displaced downward relative to the footwall (see Figure
2-12a). They are common where the earth's surface is under tensional stress so that the rock bodies are pulled apart. Normal
faults are also called gravity faults and usually are characterized by high-angle (near-vertical) fault planes. In a reverse fault, the
hanging wall has been displaced upward relative to the footwall (see Figure 2-12b). Reverse faults are frequently associated
with compressional forces that accompany folding. Low-angle (near-horizontal) reverse faults are called overthrust faults.

The orientation of planar features is determined by the attitude of the rock. The attitude is described in terms of the strike and
dip of the planar feature. The most common planar feature encountered is a sedimentary bed. Strike is defined as the trend of
the line of intersection formed between a horizontal plane and the bedding plane being measured (see Figure 2-15). The strike
line direction is given as a compass bearing that is always in reference to true north. Typical strikes would thereby fall between
north 0 to 90 degrees east or north 0 to 90 degrees west. They are never expressed as being to the southeast or southwest.
Azimuths may be readily converted to bearings (for example, an azimuth of 350 degrees would be converted to a bearing of
north 10 degrees west).

Note also the explanation for "strike," "dip" and "attitude":

Strike and dip symbols are used on geologic maps and overlays to convey structural orientation. Basic symbols include those for inclined, vertical, and horizontal beds (see Figure 2-18). For nclined beds, the direction of strike is designated as a long line that is oriented in reference to the map grid lines in exactly the same compass direction as it was measured. The direction of the dip is represented by a short line that is always drawn perpendicular to the strike line and in the direction of the dip. The angle of the dip is written next to the symbol (see Figure 2-18a). For vertical beds, the direction of the strike is designated as it is for inclined beds. The direction of the dip is a short line crossing the strike line at a right angle extending on both sides of the strike line (see Figure 2-18b). For horizontal beds, the direction of strike is represented by crossed lines which indicate that the rock strikes in every direction. The dip is represented by a circle encompassing the crossed lines. The circle implies that there is no dip direction and the dip angle is zero (see Figure 2-18c). These basic symbols are commonly used to convey
attitudes of sedimentary rocks (see Figure 2-19). Similar symbols are used to convey attitudes of other types of planar features, such as folds, faults, foliation, and jointing in other rock bodies.

From the Oxford SuperLex:
normal3 f 1 (en geometría) perpendicular, normal

From Termium:
English:Physical Geography
normal s CORRECT
DEF - A straight line perpendicular to a surface or to another line. s
1982-07-10


    Google searches
    Termium & Oxford SuperLex
Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 09:10
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 668

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff

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