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longo

English translation: long

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15:47 Nov 11, 2013
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Ships, Sailing, Maritime
Spanish term or phrase: longo
In a text concerning the machinery and process of sinking caissons, specifically once the caissons have been towed into position and are being prepared for their definitive sinking.
"Cuando el cajón llegue a la zona de fondeo se procede a unirlo a las 5 anclas y a los 2 amarres de longos del cajón contiguo, previamente fondeado, mediante 7 cabrestantes (4 transversales y 3 longitudinales)."
My attempt so far:
When the caisson reaches the sinking zone, it is tied to the 5 anchors and to the 2 (long mooring lines?) of the adjacent, previously sunk caisson, using 7 winches (4 transversal and 3 longitudinal).
It also appears later on in "Cabrestantes longos de popa" as the subtitle of a picture of some mooring ropes with part of a winch.
Does anyone have a specific term?
David Burrows
Spain
Local time: 08:24
English translation:long
Explanation:
- el largo de proa atraca la proa y sólo permite movimiento avante.
- el largo de popa atraca la popa y sólo permite movimiento atrás.

http://www.amarre.com/html/escuela/maniobras/

The aim is to reverse the boat into a space on a town quay or pontoon with the anchor laid out in front of the boat and then have the boat secured to the quayside or pontoon with two stern lines.

http://www.nisosyachtcharter.com/stern-to-mooring.html

The references are really for your second question.

Para as embarcacións de menor eslora empregaranse 22 brazos de amarre de 5 metros de longo por 0,30 de ancho, que permitirán habilitar 44 prazas;

http://www.portosdegalicia.es/en/inicio/912-portos-de-galici...

And yes, I think 'long mooring lines/ropes' would fit for your firs question.




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Note added at 3 hrs (2013-11-11 19:10:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, the last line should read '...would fit your first question'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2013-11-11 20:24:51 GMT)
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The mooring system for each caisson consists of two sets of mooring lines: lower and upper. Each set consists of 16 mooring lines.
The lower 16 lines consist of anchors that form a radius of about 300 feet. The fairlead locations for these lower 16 lines are kept
constant throughout the construction process. These 16 lines are hooked-up after the caisson is towed from the harbor and positioned at the site. For the upper 16 lines (except three lines on East Pier), the anchor locations form a radius of 600’. The fairlead locations for these upper 16 lines vary based on the draft.

http://www.zentech-usa.com/zentech/pdf/51234.pdf

And 'mooring lines' is better, not ropes. The lines could be chains.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2013-11-12 09:14:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Maybe 'surge' is the correct term.

http://deckskills.tripod.com/marinersite/id131.html

Page 34 (Fig. 4.12 a diagram of a 'longo')
http://upcommons.upc.edu/pfc/bitstream/2099.1/5971/5/04.pdf

A ship's motion in surge, sway and yaw (longitudinal, transverse, and rotational motion in the plane of the sea, respectively) can be effectively controlled by proper choice and positioning of the mooring lines.

http://www.onepetro.org/mslib/servlet/onepetropreview?id=OTC...

Surge – A vessel's transient motion in a fore and aft direction.

http://www.nauticed.org/sailingterms#M
Selected response from:

Helena Chavarria
Spain
Local time: 08:24
Grading comment
Thanks for all the info.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3long
Helena Chavarria
3longitudinal
Peter Guest


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
longitudinal


Explanation:
This is what I'd put. It looks like Portugese more than Spanish.
Fondeadero is anchorage not sinking zone. Made fast or secured is better than tied

Peter Guest
Spain
Local time: 08:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 334
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
long


Explanation:
- el largo de proa atraca la proa y sólo permite movimiento avante.
- el largo de popa atraca la popa y sólo permite movimiento atrás.

http://www.amarre.com/html/escuela/maniobras/

The aim is to reverse the boat into a space on a town quay or pontoon with the anchor laid out in front of the boat and then have the boat secured to the quayside or pontoon with two stern lines.

http://www.nisosyachtcharter.com/stern-to-mooring.html

The references are really for your second question.

Para as embarcacións de menor eslora empregaranse 22 brazos de amarre de 5 metros de longo por 0,30 de ancho, que permitirán habilitar 44 prazas;

http://www.portosdegalicia.es/en/inicio/912-portos-de-galici...

And yes, I think 'long mooring lines/ropes' would fit for your firs question.




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2013-11-11 19:10:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, the last line should read '...would fit your first question'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2013-11-11 20:24:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


The mooring system for each caisson consists of two sets of mooring lines: lower and upper. Each set consists of 16 mooring lines.
The lower 16 lines consist of anchors that form a radius of about 300 feet. The fairlead locations for these lower 16 lines are kept
constant throughout the construction process. These 16 lines are hooked-up after the caisson is towed from the harbor and positioned at the site. For the upper 16 lines (except three lines on East Pier), the anchor locations form a radius of 600’. The fairlead locations for these upper 16 lines vary based on the draft.

http://www.zentech-usa.com/zentech/pdf/51234.pdf

And 'mooring lines' is better, not ropes. The lines could be chains.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2013-11-12 09:14:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Maybe 'surge' is the correct term.

http://deckskills.tripod.com/marinersite/id131.html

Page 34 (Fig. 4.12 a diagram of a 'longo')
http://upcommons.upc.edu/pfc/bitstream/2099.1/5971/5/04.pdf

A ship's motion in surge, sway and yaw (longitudinal, transverse, and rotational motion in the plane of the sea, respectively) can be effectively controlled by proper choice and positioning of the mooring lines.

http://www.onepetro.org/mslib/servlet/onepetropreview?id=OTC...

Surge – A vessel's transient motion in a fore and aft direction.

http://www.nauticed.org/sailingterms#M

Helena Chavarria
Spain
Local time: 08:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 57
Grading comment
Thanks for all the info.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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