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Vete a la porra!

English translation: go to hell

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:vete a la porra
English translation:go to hell
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17:25 Nov 15, 2001
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Slang
Spanish term or phrase: Vete a la porra!
I am wondering what this means because my spanish teacher told us to figure out what it means, and she would give us extra credit.
Geoffrey
It´s a very old phrase
Explanation:
At the risk of being caught off guard, I believe this is a bona fide asker.

As I know the story, told to me by Spanish priests at my grade school La Salle, it´s an old phrase used years ago in the Spanish armed forces, mainly the infantry. Sorry, don´t have a date.

During field operations or military actions, when a military contingent struck camp, they would drive a stake into the ground on the fringes of the encampment and away from the warmth of the fire and the evening fare This they called "porra" because of it´s heavy and stout appearance. Any enlisted man who commited a minor offense was ordered to spend the night guarding the "porra".

"Vete a la porra" became a euphemism for "got to blazes" as my colleague well suggests as well as for "go to hell" or whatever the norm for your teacher may be.

Choose what you would substitute and there you have one version of this age old dismissal.

BoBL

F
Selected response from:

Francis Icaza
United States
Local time: 21:50
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2OK... first of all...
Rick Henry
4Excellent, Francis. Diez puntos. Robert
Robert INGLEDEW
4It´s a very old phrase
Francis Icaza
4Go to blazer!Serge L
4Sometimes you get lucky
Francis Icaza
4 -1This type of questions is not adequate for this site
Robert INGLEDEW


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Go to blazer!


Explanation:
HTH,

Serge L.


    Reference: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=porr...
Serge L
Local time: 03:50
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
OK... first of all...


Explanation:
It has nothing to do with Tech/Engineering as you selected. It's
basically a way to say "go to hell".
(So who are you trying to insult, hmm?)

HTH

Rick

Rick Henry
United States
Local time: 20:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Baruch Avidar: It is a common expression in Spain and in Spanish literature
56 mins

agree  Andrea Bullrich
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
This type of questions is not adequate for this site


Explanation:
All of us know it means go to hell, but should we answer this type of questions?

Robert INGLEDEW
Argentina
Local time: 23:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  kynthos: Why not? Isn't part of the language?
19 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
It´s a very old phrase


Explanation:
At the risk of being caught off guard, I believe this is a bona fide asker.

As I know the story, told to me by Spanish priests at my grade school La Salle, it´s an old phrase used years ago in the Spanish armed forces, mainly the infantry. Sorry, don´t have a date.

During field operations or military actions, when a military contingent struck camp, they would drive a stake into the ground on the fringes of the encampment and away from the warmth of the fire and the evening fare This they called "porra" because of it´s heavy and stout appearance. Any enlisted man who commited a minor offense was ordered to spend the night guarding the "porra".

"Vete a la porra" became a euphemism for "got to blazes" as my colleague well suggests as well as for "go to hell" or whatever the norm for your teacher may be.

Choose what you would substitute and there you have one version of this age old dismissal.

BoBL

F

Francis Icaza
United States
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Excellent, Francis. Diez puntos. Robert


Explanation:
This is an excellent answer.

Robert INGLEDEW
Argentina
Local time: 23:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Sometimes you get lucky


Explanation:
and you actually remember your "Spanish military disciplinary actions in the field" trivia such as this. (Whew!)

Thanks for the good words, really

F

Francis Icaza
United States
Local time: 21:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Jul 31, 2005 - Changes made by Nikki Graham:
FieldTech/Engineering » Other
Field (specific)(none) » Slang


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