International Translation Day 2017

Join ProZ.com/TV for a FREE event on September 26-27th celebrating International Translation Day! 50+ hours of content, Chat, Live Q&A & more. Join 1,000's of linguists from around the globe as ProZ.com/TV celebrates International Translation Day.

Click for Full Participation
KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Slang

Mi'ja

English translation: dear, my dear, darling, honey, sweetie, miss

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Mija / mi'ja
English translation:dear, my dear, darling, honey, sweetie, miss
Entered by: Marialba Baez
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

05:22 Aug 14, 2010
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Slang
Spanish term or phrase: Mi'ja
Contexto: woman asking somebody (a stranger) for help and he answers:

¿Qué pasó, mi’ja? ¿En qué la puedo servir?

Ese mi'ja (mi hija) que usualmente lo usamos entre parientes y amigos para indicar :sweetie, dear, you, my friend, son, etc...en este caso, cual seria la mejor manera de traducirlo? Pense en "Ma'am" "Miss" "dear" o "Sweetie"...No se, "daughter" no suena natural.

Gracias por la ayuda
Marialba Baez
Local time: 06:17
my dear, darling
Explanation:
Pocket Oxford Spanish Dictionary © 2005 Oxford University Press:

mijo2 -ja pronombre (apelativo) (AmL fam) dear;
¿qué le pasa, mijita? what's the matter, darling? (colloq)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2010-08-14 06:49:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Me alegro de que te sirva :)
Selected response from:

Maria Mastruzzo
Australia
Local time: 20:17
Grading comment
Thanks again.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +7my dear, darling
Maria Mastruzzo
4 +5honey
eski
5 +1miss
Monica Colangelo
5 +1sweetieSibylle Gray
3 +2love
bcsantos


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
mi'ja
miss


Explanation:
Yo diría "miss" porque es un poco menos educado. Madam es lo más correcto y más educado.

Monica Colangelo
Argentina
Local time: 07:17
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Gracias!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jacqueline Rosa-Kuhn: I'm Puerto Rican and I know this phrase. In this specific case, this is absolutely the best option!
19 hrs
  -> Thanks, jkuhn
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
mi'ja
my dear, darling


Explanation:
Pocket Oxford Spanish Dictionary © 2005 Oxford University Press:

mijo2 -ja pronombre (apelativo) (AmL fam) dear;
¿qué le pasa, mijita? what's the matter, darling? (colloq)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2010-08-14 06:49:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Me alegro de que te sirva :)

Maria Mastruzzo
Australia
Local time: 20:17
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thanks again.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Gracias!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bárbara Oliver
33 mins
  -> Muchas gracias y saludos Bárbara :)

agree  eski: "My dear"; I'd say. (since it's a stranger)Saludos, eski
1 hr
  -> It sounds more appropiate, thank you very much eski :)

agree  franglish: simply "dear"
2 hrs
  -> Thank you very much franglish :)

agree  Robert Feuerlein
3 hrs
  -> Thank you very much Robert :)

agree  med80
7 hrs
  -> Thank you very much med80 :)

agree  Jairo Payan: De acuerdo, respecto al texto en español, lo he visto escrito con apóstrofre: Mijo, mija, mijito, mijita
8 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias y saludos jairo :)

agree  Adriana de Groote: De acuerdo con franglish, simplemente "dear". Algo así como "Yes, dear, what can I do for you?"
9 hrs
  -> Thank you very much Adriana :)

agree  Christine Walsh: Or even 'dearie'. Depends on age of both speakers, social group, region, etc. An older speaker in the UK might use this, and the register is similar.
9 hrs
  -> Thank you very much Christine :)

disagree  Jacqueline Rosa-Kuhn: This is not the meaning when this word is used by a stranger to a stranger.
19 hrs
  -> The use of Mi'ja in Spanish has the same connotations of "dear, darling" in English.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
love


Explanation:
What happened love; what's the matter love

bcsantos
Gibraltar
Local time: 12:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Wendy Streitparth: Maybe its regional, but I think this is now more common than dear.
4 mins
  -> Thanks :)

agree  xxxcmwilliams: especially for UK but not sure about US.
1 hr
  -> Thanks :)

agree  Cinnamon Nolan: Yes, especially for the UK. Very common form, in line with the informality of the Spanish, would be "What happened, luv?"
3 hrs
  -> You're right. Thanks

disagree  Monica Colangelo: I am sure it is not used with a total stranger.
8 hrs
  -> I'm afraid it is in the UK!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
mi'ja
honey


Explanation:
Another common alternative:

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2010-08-14 06:52:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

was overjoyed that no one had bought him yet. I longed to hold him and brush away the cobwebs between his ears. I wanted to say, “It's all right, Honey. ...
books.google.com.mx/books?isbn=1558747257...

Saludos,
eski

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2010-08-14 18:45:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks Marialba;
I know that this a common enough expression, having lived in the States (where I grew up) with a son and four daughters of my own; I often used it –even when referring to one of their female friends whom I'd only recently met.

Saludos from a very rainy Acapulco,
eski

eski
Mexico
Local time: 05:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: That's true. Thanks!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lizette Britz
1 hr
  -> Thank you & muchos saludos from (a rainy) Acapulco, Lizette! eski

agree  Thayenga
8 hrs
  -> Hi Thayenga: Thanks for your confirmation! eski

agree  Christine Walsh: A good choice for US English.
8 hrs
  -> Gracias y muchos saludos, Chris! :)) eski

agree  ldfx
9 hrs
  -> Gracias por tu confirmacion, ldfx: Saludos! eski

agree  Sibylle Gray: Yes, down here in the deep South, strangers call you "honey" all the time - clerks at stores, librarians, and, of course, the same holds true for above-mentioned scenario. "Sweetie" is also used a lot in those situations.
1 day20 hrs
  -> Thx Sibylle; I grew up in Coconout Grove, Fl: "Honey" was and, I believe, still is–used quite widely: My girlfriend's mom used to call me 'honey', but then again.I think she knew I had a secret crush on her...:)) Saludos from DEEP South (Acapulco!) eski
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sweetie


Explanation:
In the US, "sweetie" or "honey" are a good choice, esp. in the South.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day21 hrs (2010-08-16 03:14:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In this case, the example sentence should read: "Hey sweetie, what can I do for you?"

Example sentence(s):
  • Hey honey, what can I do for you?
Sibylle Gray
United States
Local time: 05:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  eski: Why, shucks..now–aint y'all a SWEETIE if theah eva' was one? BTW; Honey, just read your profile and was blown away: ¡Felicidades, MAESTRA!!! :)) eski
13 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Aug 19, 2010 - Changes made by Marialba Baez:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/41402">Marialba Baez's</a> old entry - "Mi\'ja" » "dear, my dear, darling, honey, sweetie"
Aug 14, 2010 - Changes made by Beatriz Ramírez de Haro:
Language pairEnglish to Spanish » Spanish to English


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search