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cesiones (football)

English translation: deliberate back-passes (handling of)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:cesiones (football)
English translation:deliberate back-passes (handling of)
Entered by: Adam Burman
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15:19 Apr 2, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Sports / Fitness / Recreation / football
Spanish term or phrase: cesiones (football)
I know what this refers to but I am unsure of the equivalent foul in English.

Todas las faltas se golpean de forma directa a excepción de las faltas indirectas (cesiones, juego peligroso, etc.) que se produzcan dentro del área pequeña que lo harán con saque de libre indirecto.



From Wikipedia:
La cesión, en el fútbol, es una regla que impide que un jugador pase deliberadamente con el pie la pelota a su portero, y éste la coja con las manos.
Adam Burman
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:35
deliberate back-passes (handling of)
Explanation:
Sounds a bit clumsy bit this is what it is.

Refs:

The Sun Online - Champions League: Barcelona 1 Liverpool 2And when ref Kyros Vassaras controversially ruled Juliano’s interception back to Valdes was a deliberate back-pass, the keeper had to be at his best to ...
www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,11061-2007080699,00.html - Similar pages

Scotsman.com Sport - Football - Scottish Premier - Stillie hits ...It somehow evaded the mass of Dunfermline players trying to block the free kick awarded when goalkeeper Derek Stillie handled a deliberate back pass. ...
www.scotsman.com/?id=197732005
Selected response from:

James Calder
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:35
Grading comment
Thanks James and Alvaro!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4deliberate back-passes (handling of)
James Calder
4 +3backpassing
moken


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
backpassing


Explanation:
Hi Adam,

Found on a BBC blog:

The Backpass Rule in Football

Once upon a time, not very long ago, football teams defending a narrow advantage in a game would often waste time by repeatedly passing the ball back to their goalkeeper.

The 'keeper would then often pick up the ball, bounce it a couple of times, roll it along the ground, and generally do as much as possible to waste more time before finally kicking it upfield. So effective was this ploy as a time-wasting measure that it wasn't uncommon to see backpasses to the goalkeeper being made from somewhere around the half-way line.

The trouble was that endless backpasses hardly made great entertainment for the spectators, and the tactic's effectiveness encouraged negative, cynical football.

It was this that led football's world governing body FIFA to make the biggest change to the laws of the game for many years, when they introduced the backpass rule in 1992.

What the Backpass Rule Says

The FIFA football rule book states that the goalkeeper may not handle the ball '...if it has been deliberately kicked to him1 by a team-mate'.

If the goalkeeper does handle the ball in those circumstances, then an indirect free-kick2 is awarded to the attacking team, to be taken from the place where the 'keeper handled the ball'.

The 'deliberately kicked' part is crucial. The backpass rule does not apply if the ball is headed to the goalkeeper by a team-mate. It's also perfectly OK for the 'keeper to pick up the ball if it merely deflects off a team-mate's boot during play - if, for instance, an opponent's shot is deflected by a defender's boot and the goalkeeper then saves the shot.

It's this last aspect of the rule that leads to disputed decisions, since the referee will often have to decide whether a defender actually intended to guide the ball to the goalkeeper. Referees usually give the benefit of any doubt to the defence.

The Effect of the Backpass Rule

The introduction of the backpass rule certainly succeeded in making negative, defensive football more difficult. A goalkeeper receiving a backpass must now control the ball and clear it upfield without using his hands and arms.

Naturally, the opposition will usually try to pressurise the goalkeeper into disposing of the ball as quickly as possible. This has led to some classic comedy goals, when hasty attempted clearances have struck players and rebounded into the net, or even when a harrassed 'keeper has hurriedly swung a boot at the ball and ended up missing it altogether.

Defenders and goalkeepers are generally careful not to break the backpass rule, because being caught doing so often means a free-kick being awarded to the attacking team very close to goal. When this happens, it usually leads to a tense situation in which one player from the attacking team will tap the indirect free-kick to a team-mate, who will then try to blast the ball past a wall of defenders lined up either on or near the goal-line.

The backpass rule was controversial when it was first introduced, but most football fans would probably now agree that the rule makes the game more exciting. It has also had the happy side-effect of improving the average goalkeeper's ball-control skills, since the modern 'keeper has to control the ball with his feet far more often than did 'keepers of earlier generations.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A757433


What I'm not sure is whether just "backpassing" would be sufficiently clear, or whether you should sepcify "backpassing to the keeper".

Good luck!

Álvaro :O) :O)

moken
Local time: 10:35
Works in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 92

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Swatchka: Ya sabía yo que ibas a constestar :))
7 mins
  -> ¿Por qué será...? Gracias Swatchka. :O) :O)

agree  Noni Gilbert
38 mins
  -> :O) :O)

agree  Jose Aguilar
3 hrs
  -> :O)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
deliberate back-passes (handling of)


Explanation:
Sounds a bit clumsy bit this is what it is.

Refs:

The Sun Online - Champions League: Barcelona 1 Liverpool 2And when ref Kyros Vassaras controversially ruled Juliano’s interception back to Valdes was a deliberate back-pass, the keeper had to be at his best to ...
www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,11061-2007080699,00.html - Similar pages

Scotsman.com Sport - Football - Scottish Premier - Stillie hits ...It somehow evaded the mass of Dunfermline players trying to block the free kick awarded when goalkeeper Derek Stillie handled a deliberate back pass. ...
www.scotsman.com/?id=197732005


James Calder
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:35
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 264
Grading comment
Thanks James and Alvaro!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr. Andrew Frankland
5 mins

agree  Noni Gilbert
38 mins

agree  moken: You're right James, the rule includes both the notion of "deliberate backpassing" and of "handling the ball". Although "cesiones" doesn't verbalize these concepts, they are implicit and it's probably best to specify. :O) :O)
1 hr
  -> Yes Alvaro, it's not the back-pass that's been outlawed per se, but the handling of an intentional back-pass by the keeper.

agree  Edward Tully
2 hrs
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