rodar en pelotón

English translation: riding in a pack / peloton / pack riding

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:rodar en pelotón
English translation:riding in a pack / peloton / pack riding
Entered by: maryblack
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12:33 Dec 16, 2016
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Sports / Fitness / Recreation / Bicycling
Spanish term or phrase: rodar en pelotón
I'm guessing this is a particular formation, and I see references to it in Spanish, but I have no idea what it might be called in English. Thanks!!
maryblack
United States
Local time: 02:13
riding in a pack / peloton / pack riding
Explanation:
Peloton is French and both Spanish and English have borrowed it. "Riding in a peloton" is perfectly OK in English, but perhaps "riding in a pack" is a bit more common. In commentary on cycling racings you hear about riders "breaking away from the pack" or "breaking away from the peloton".

"6 Tips for Riding in a Pack
Every road cyclist should have the opportunity to feel the adrenaline rush of riding fast in a pack. It is truly an exhilarating experience. While pack riding is an integral part of road racing, even group training rides or organized charity rides can involve large numbers of cyclists riding in close proximity at high speeds."
http://www.active.com/cycling/articles/6-tips-for-riding-in-...

"Riding in a peloton will save most of the riders up to 30% of their energy due to less wind resistance and air pressure changes."
http://thecyclingbug.co.uk/health-and-fitness/training-tips/...
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 09:13
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2riding in a pack/bunch/group/peloton
Simon Bruni
4 +2riding in a pack / peloton / pack riding
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
riding in a pack / peloton / pack riding


Explanation:
Peloton is French and both Spanish and English have borrowed it. "Riding in a peloton" is perfectly OK in English, but perhaps "riding in a pack" is a bit more common. In commentary on cycling racings you hear about riders "breaking away from the pack" or "breaking away from the peloton".

"6 Tips for Riding in a Pack
Every road cyclist should have the opportunity to feel the adrenaline rush of riding fast in a pack. It is truly an exhilarating experience. While pack riding is an integral part of road racing, even group training rides or organized charity rides can involve large numbers of cyclists riding in close proximity at high speeds."
http://www.active.com/cycling/articles/6-tips-for-riding-in-...

"Riding in a peloton will save most of the riders up to 30% of their energy due to less wind resistance and air pressure changes."
http://thecyclingbug.co.uk/health-and-fitness/training-tips/...

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 09:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 111

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Simon Bruni
0 min
  -> Thanks, Simon :)

agree  Robert Carter: I think the context will determine which one to use.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Robert. Yes indeed.

neutral  Francois Boye: When did English adopt the word 'peloton'? Before or after the global commercialization of the Tour de France?? Thanks! Another question: Was the Tour popular in the UK when Tom Simpson died on the Mont Ventoux in July 1967?//Thank you very much!
9 hrs
  -> Apparently it was in the 1950s, but I'm sure it must come from the Tour. // Not as much as now, but it was known. I was a child then, but I was aware of it; it was covered on the BBC, though not live.
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
riding in a pack/bunch/group/peloton


Explanation:
From the Oxford Spanish, and you do also hear "peloton" (French word, I believe) in TV cycling commentary:

pelotón masculino

1 (Militar) squad

2 (en ciclismo) bunch, pack, group; (en atletismo) pack

3 (familiar) (de gente) gang (familiar)

4 (de pelos, hilo) tangle, mass


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peloton
Simon Bruni
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 143

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: Pretty well neck-and-neck, by the look of it
5 mins

agree  Robert Carter: I think the context will determine which one to use.
6 hrs

neutral  Francois Boye: When did English adopt the word 'peloton'? Before or after the global commercialization of the Tour de France?
9 hrs
  -> Why shouldn't a language borrow foreign words?
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