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barrenillo, caobina, canelón

English translation: borer, caobina, rapanea/muttonwood

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:barrenillo, caobina, canelón
English translation:borer, caobina, rapanea/muttonwood
Entered by: Nikki Graham
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10:28 Nov 14, 2001
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
Spanish term or phrase: barrenillo, caobina, canelón
These are the names of woods using in furniture-making in Honduras. I cannot find them in any of my references.
Paul Sadur
Local time: 02:53
borer, caobina, rapanea/muttonwood
Explanation:
These are three difficult questions in one (yes, I'm complaining)

1. As far as I can gather, barrenillo is one of those nasty insects that eat wood. Seemed to be Scolytus amygdali, which is an almond-tree borer. But there are lots of different types of borer, so borer should do. Unless, of course, it's a type of wood. No evidence found for this.
http://www.larural.es/servagro/fitosanitario/avisos/aviso00_...

http://www.larural.es/servagin/fitosanitario/avisos/aviso00_...

2. caobina - not many references at all. One says its scientific name is Mauria sessiliflora. In this ref.

The tropical evergreen to semi−evergreen rain forest along the Atlantic coast is a tall and dense forest. There are many species of canopy trees, some being deciduous during the dry season. The forest has a complex and diverse flora, and the number of vascular plant species approximates 5000. Canopy trees reach 30 to 40 m high with emergent trees up to 50 m. Trees have round crowns and thick, clean, and vigorous stems, some with well−developed buttresses. The subcanopy layer is dense with trees from 5 to 25 m tall, most of them with good−shaped stems and small buttresses. The understorey layers present a great variety of palms and tree ferns. Forest stands are typically of mixed ages with a great abundance of air plants (epiphytes): bromeliads, ferns, and orchids among others. Common tree species include: paque or paleto (Dialium guianense), allspice tree (Pimenta dioica), breadnut (Brosimum alicastrum), Manteco (Ampelocera hottlei), Masica (Brosimun alicastrum), Masaquilla (Pseudolmedia cf. spurea), Laurel (Cordia alliodora, C. bicolor) Maria (Callophyllum brasiliense), Hule (Castilla elastica, C. Tunu), Cuajada (Dendropanax arboreus), Caobina (Mauria sessiliflora), Seliyon (Pouteria izabslensis), Sangre de Pozo (Pterocarpus offfcinalis), Varillo (Zymphonia globulifera), Caoba (Swietenia macrophyulla), Cumbillo or sombrerete (Terminalia amazonia), Sangre Real (Virola koschnyi) and San Juan or copai−yé wood (Vochisia hondurensis).
http://www.fao.org/forestry/fo/fra/general.jsp?geo_id=4252

But I couldn't find any evidence of this either. So I suggest you leave it as it is.

http://www.google.com/search?q=caobina&btnG=Bsqueda en Goog...

3. canelón seems to be a type of Rapanea, but there were just too many different references: Rapanea ferruginea/laetevirens/lorentzina, etc.

Found a page in English all about it, but with no name. Certain types of Rapanea seem to be called something muttonwood. So if you don't leave it as it is, you could use muttonwood, I suppose.
Selected response from:

Nikki Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:53
Grading comment
Thanks. I'll leave "barrenillo". I know of the "insect" meaning, but this is definitely a wood that can be used for furniture.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4borer, caobina, rapanea/muttonwood
Nikki Graham
4contextcarpman22


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
context


Explanation:
Any chance we could get some more detailed context?

carpman22
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:53
PRO pts in pair: 17
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
borer, caobina, rapanea/muttonwood


Explanation:
These are three difficult questions in one (yes, I'm complaining)

1. As far as I can gather, barrenillo is one of those nasty insects that eat wood. Seemed to be Scolytus amygdali, which is an almond-tree borer. But there are lots of different types of borer, so borer should do. Unless, of course, it's a type of wood. No evidence found for this.
http://www.larural.es/servagro/fitosanitario/avisos/aviso00_...

http://www.larural.es/servagin/fitosanitario/avisos/aviso00_...

2. caobina - not many references at all. One says its scientific name is Mauria sessiliflora. In this ref.

The tropical evergreen to semi−evergreen rain forest along the Atlantic coast is a tall and dense forest. There are many species of canopy trees, some being deciduous during the dry season. The forest has a complex and diverse flora, and the number of vascular plant species approximates 5000. Canopy trees reach 30 to 40 m high with emergent trees up to 50 m. Trees have round crowns and thick, clean, and vigorous stems, some with well−developed buttresses. The subcanopy layer is dense with trees from 5 to 25 m tall, most of them with good−shaped stems and small buttresses. The understorey layers present a great variety of palms and tree ferns. Forest stands are typically of mixed ages with a great abundance of air plants (epiphytes): bromeliads, ferns, and orchids among others. Common tree species include: paque or paleto (Dialium guianense), allspice tree (Pimenta dioica), breadnut (Brosimum alicastrum), Manteco (Ampelocera hottlei), Masica (Brosimun alicastrum), Masaquilla (Pseudolmedia cf. spurea), Laurel (Cordia alliodora, C. bicolor) Maria (Callophyllum brasiliense), Hule (Castilla elastica, C. Tunu), Cuajada (Dendropanax arboreus), Caobina (Mauria sessiliflora), Seliyon (Pouteria izabslensis), Sangre de Pozo (Pterocarpus offfcinalis), Varillo (Zymphonia globulifera), Caoba (Swietenia macrophyulla), Cumbillo or sombrerete (Terminalia amazonia), Sangre Real (Virola koschnyi) and San Juan or copai−yé wood (Vochisia hondurensis).
http://www.fao.org/forestry/fo/fra/general.jsp?geo_id=4252

But I couldn't find any evidence of this either. So I suggest you leave it as it is.

http://www.google.com/search?q=caobina&btnG=Bsqueda en Goog...

3. canelón seems to be a type of Rapanea, but there were just too many different references: Rapanea ferruginea/laetevirens/lorentzina, etc.

Found a page in English all about it, but with no name. Certain types of Rapanea seem to be called something muttonwood. So if you don't leave it as it is, you could use muttonwood, I suppose.



    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?q=+%22rapanea%22%2Bmuttonwood&h...
    Reference: http://django.harvard.edu/users/jjarvie/Itemscan/Rapanea.htm
Nikki Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5584
Grading comment
Thanks. I'll leave "barrenillo". I know of the "insect" meaning, but this is definitely a wood that can be used for furniture.
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