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desarrollo auditivo y tecnologia del audio

English translation: auditive development and audio technology

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:desarrollo auditivo y tecnologia del audio
English translation:auditive development and audio technology
Entered by: DR. RICHARD BAVRY
Options:
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00:10 Jun 5, 2001
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
Spanish term or phrase: desarrollo auditivo y tecnologia del audio
it's the name of a subject in an academic record of a student studying 'Professional Audio' at a School of Sound
Joel Magarey
auditive development and audio technology
Explanation:
A search using Google gave many hits for *auditive*, one of the most relevant (and interesting) of which was at

http://www.hud.ac.uk/schools/music humanities/music/newmusic...

[embellishment with asterisks by me]

The *Auditive* Memory and its function in the late works of Morton Feldman | Bryn Harrison
In the essay Crippled Symmetry, Feldman writes:

The reciprocity inherent in scale ... has made me realise that musical forms and related processes are essentially only methods of arranging material and serve no other function than to aid one's memory. [1]
How do we perceive form in music, and how is this related to our sense of memory? In order to discuss these issues it is necessary first to consider how duration relates to human experience. Mary Warnock writes:

Memory and personal identity are inextricably linked, neither concept being prior to nor separable from the other. The sense of personal identity that each of us has is a sense of continuity through time. [2]
The composer George Rochberg offers us the following comments in his 1960 essay Duration in Music:

We live between memory and anticipation, between the past and the future ... We live in time and through time. We are both of it and immersed in it. The present is therefore more than the moment of physical existence in which we feel pain or joy ... The present is destined to join the vast accumulation of all other lived moments of life ... everything, consciously or unconsciously becomes a part of memory. [3]
He goes on to say that although all our experiences are retained we use our powers of deduction to impose an order of some kind onto our affective memory in order to see meaning in our existence.

It could be considered to be this same reliance on memory and unconscious sense of ordering within the brain that has given rise to the development of form in Western music. As Rochberg states:

The power of return in music serves much more than a purely formal function about which we have heard so much in the past from theorists and aestheticians: ideas of unity in variety, repetition and return ... etc. It does not account for the sheer power of return, nor does it account for the enormous satisfaction gained when the meaning of a work is suddenly crystallised by the arrival at ideas, stated earlier in the work, emerging on a new plane. Return in music has something of the force of the past suddenly illuminating the felt present as a real element in the present. [4]
Whilst composers and listeners alike have intuitively or formally adhered to these traditional methods of construction there have been others who have treated such approaches with suspicion. For Morton Feldman, these methods were simply too primitive. Whilst he accepted that a construction such as A B A form "works beautifully" [5] he felt that such forms had become taken for granted, clichéd and overused:

What Western musical forms have become is a paraphrase of memory. [6]
These observations led Feldman to consider that memory could operate in a different way through a conscious attempt at "formalising a disorientation of memory". [7] However, as Jean-Luc Fafchamps has observed:

... it is not easy to dismantle form. It supposes a profound evaluation of the *auditive* memory; for the smallest recurrence or the slightest accidental alteration of a leading note will revive our structural expectations, creating an impression of dynamicforethought, short-circuiting that free-fall within the instant crucial to our perception of a music of free association. [8]
Feldman's aesthetic, therefore, had to "avoid any acoustical anecdote likely to orient the auditive memory."[9]
.......................

[the article continues, but in the interest of brevity I will snip it here]

I hope that this helps!
Selected response from:

DR. RICHARD BAVRY
Grading comment
I'm still not sure this is the answer - but not because of any inadequacy in your response; more because the student himself says the subject has more to do with physics than your research would indicate. But thanks a lot anyway.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naHearing skills development & Audio technologyIvan Sanchez
naI would just like to answer to Mr/Ms "no such animal"
Davorka Grgic
naauditive development and audio technologyDR. RICHARD BAVRY
namusical hearing development / audio technology
Davorka Grgic


  

Answers


40 mins
musical hearing development / audio technology


Explanation:
That´s it.


    conocimiento propio
    Soy maestra de canto.
Davorka Grgic
Local time: 09:59
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 498
Grading comment
the subject's something more to do with physics

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
DR. RICHARD BAVRY: *musical hearing development*??? No such animal exists in English!
14 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: the subject's something more to do with physics

1 hr
auditive development and audio technology


Explanation:
A search using Google gave many hits for *auditive*, one of the most relevant (and interesting) of which was at

http://www.hud.ac.uk/schools/music humanities/music/newmusic...

[embellishment with asterisks by me]

The *Auditive* Memory and its function in the late works of Morton Feldman | Bryn Harrison
In the essay Crippled Symmetry, Feldman writes:

The reciprocity inherent in scale ... has made me realise that musical forms and related processes are essentially only methods of arranging material and serve no other function than to aid one's memory. [1]
How do we perceive form in music, and how is this related to our sense of memory? In order to discuss these issues it is necessary first to consider how duration relates to human experience. Mary Warnock writes:

Memory and personal identity are inextricably linked, neither concept being prior to nor separable from the other. The sense of personal identity that each of us has is a sense of continuity through time. [2]
The composer George Rochberg offers us the following comments in his 1960 essay Duration in Music:

We live between memory and anticipation, between the past and the future ... We live in time and through time. We are both of it and immersed in it. The present is therefore more than the moment of physical existence in which we feel pain or joy ... The present is destined to join the vast accumulation of all other lived moments of life ... everything, consciously or unconsciously becomes a part of memory. [3]
He goes on to say that although all our experiences are retained we use our powers of deduction to impose an order of some kind onto our affective memory in order to see meaning in our existence.

It could be considered to be this same reliance on memory and unconscious sense of ordering within the brain that has given rise to the development of form in Western music. As Rochberg states:

The power of return in music serves much more than a purely formal function about which we have heard so much in the past from theorists and aestheticians: ideas of unity in variety, repetition and return ... etc. It does not account for the sheer power of return, nor does it account for the enormous satisfaction gained when the meaning of a work is suddenly crystallised by the arrival at ideas, stated earlier in the work, emerging on a new plane. Return in music has something of the force of the past suddenly illuminating the felt present as a real element in the present. [4]
Whilst composers and listeners alike have intuitively or formally adhered to these traditional methods of construction there have been others who have treated such approaches with suspicion. For Morton Feldman, these methods were simply too primitive. Whilst he accepted that a construction such as A B A form "works beautifully" [5] he felt that such forms had become taken for granted, clichéd and overused:

What Western musical forms have become is a paraphrase of memory. [6]
These observations led Feldman to consider that memory could operate in a different way through a conscious attempt at "formalising a disorientation of memory". [7] However, as Jean-Luc Fafchamps has observed:

... it is not easy to dismantle form. It supposes a profound evaluation of the *auditive* memory; for the smallest recurrence or the slightest accidental alteration of a leading note will revive our structural expectations, creating an impression of dynamicforethought, short-circuiting that free-fall within the instant crucial to our perception of a music of free association. [8]
Feldman's aesthetic, therefore, had to "avoid any acoustical anecdote likely to orient the auditive memory."[9]
.......................

[the article continues, but in the interest of brevity I will snip it here]

I hope that this helps!


    see above
DR. RICHARD BAVRY
PRO pts in pair: 94
Grading comment
I'm still not sure this is the answer - but not because of any inadequacy in your response; more because the student himself says the subject has more to do with physics than your research would indicate. But thanks a lot anyway.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs
I would just like to answer to Mr/Ms "no such animal"


Explanation:

VOLUME 24, NO. 1 AN AFFILIATE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN KODALY EDUCATORS
SEPTEMBER, 2000

NCAKE WORKSHOPS FOR 2000-2001
THESE WORKSHOPS ARE FREE TO NCAKE MEMBERS. SEE THE BACK COVER FOR AN APPLICATION.


October 21, 2000 from 9:00 - 3:00, Jerry-Louis Jaccard will present
"Starting in the Middle: Singing and Hearing for Older Children, Adoles-
cent, and Adult Beginners" at Ellen Driscoll Playhouse, 325 Highland Avenue,
Piedmont (the auditorium for Havens Elementary School - corner of Oakland and High-
land Avenues).
A practical, hands-on workshop to explore principles, practices, and diagnostics
for developing solid singing skills in students who come to singing after the fact.
Participants will also be guided in building upon in-tune singing skills for the
development of musical hearing, reading, and writing skills in older students.
Participant involvement, handouts, and audio-video clips will be used to illustrate
various principles and practices.
http://oake.org/ncake/NCAKEv24no1.pdf

My appologies to all professionals that are reading this.


Davorka Grgic
Local time: 09:59
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 498

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
DR. RICHARD BAVRY: *musical-listening* development maybe...*musical-hearing* development preposterous!
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs
Hearing skills development & Audio technology


Explanation:
Luck!

Ivan Sanchez
Local time: 03:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 168
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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