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comprobado por varilla el combustible en mad

English translation: fuel level being checked in the external fuel tanks using a gauge stick

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12:08 Sep 8, 2001
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering
Spanish term or phrase: comprobado por varilla el combustible en mad
aircraft fuel system
sptombs
English translation:fuel level being checked in the external fuel tanks using a gauge stick
Explanation:
I think "Gauge stick" is better for varilla, but "level stick" , and let's be honest "dipstick", are also used.

As far as I can see, technically, a dipstick is used mainly for oil levels, and ¡OJO! should form part of the engine and therefore "sleep" in it or in the tank/reservoir. A gauge stick is something you keep somewhere else and use to measure, usually, fuel, whether in aircraft, other vehicles, or ground tanks.

That said, there there are a lot of references to using a dipstick for fuel, and not being part of the engine or tank. Whether these refs are technically "inaccurate" I don't know, but they form a part of general usage.

A military reference for gauge stick, although used in helicopters, is:
"... helicopters. The gauge stick is specifically designed to accurately determine the amount of fuel contained in external fuel tanks found on Army aircraft..."
www.carson.army.mil/MEDIA/Releases/01-052.htm


The Mad and Mad-Nap are types of external fuel tank used on different models of Mirage (and other types?) by the Argentinian AirForce, according to the following reference:
www.giga.com.er/rommel/saorbats/FAA_cantidades.htm

I don't know if they are tip tanks or suspended, whether they are releasable or not, and I haven't found any other references so presumably it is only used by the Argentinians.

Does this tie into the rest of your context??

As to whether I am guessing or not, the references exist, the context is appropriate, but for varilla the usage is varied, for "Mad" I can't find anything else.
Selected response from:

Sean Lyle
Local time: 10:14
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4fuel level being checked in the external fuel tanks using a gauge stickSean Lyle
3 +1dispstickslprz


  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
dispstick


Explanation:
The amount of fuel is tested with a dipstick

No idea what "mad" is at the moment.



slprz
United States
Local time: 01:14
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jorge Alvarez Spencer
3 hrs
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1 day 15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
fuel level being checked in the external fuel tanks using a gauge stick


Explanation:
I think "Gauge stick" is better for varilla, but "level stick" , and let's be honest "dipstick", are also used.

As far as I can see, technically, a dipstick is used mainly for oil levels, and ¡OJO! should form part of the engine and therefore "sleep" in it or in the tank/reservoir. A gauge stick is something you keep somewhere else and use to measure, usually, fuel, whether in aircraft, other vehicles, or ground tanks.

That said, there there are a lot of references to using a dipstick for fuel, and not being part of the engine or tank. Whether these refs are technically "inaccurate" I don't know, but they form a part of general usage.

A military reference for gauge stick, although used in helicopters, is:
"... helicopters. The gauge stick is specifically designed to accurately determine the amount of fuel contained in external fuel tanks found on Army aircraft..."
www.carson.army.mil/MEDIA/Releases/01-052.htm


The Mad and Mad-Nap are types of external fuel tank used on different models of Mirage (and other types?) by the Argentinian AirForce, according to the following reference:
www.giga.com.er/rommel/saorbats/FAA_cantidades.htm

I don't know if they are tip tanks or suspended, whether they are releasable or not, and I haven't found any other references so presumably it is only used by the Argentinians.

Does this tie into the rest of your context??

As to whether I am guessing or not, the references exist, the context is appropriate, but for varilla the usage is varied, for "Mad" I can't find anything else.

Sean Lyle
Local time: 10:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 63
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