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puestos de banalización

English translation: passing loop; reversible working

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:puestos de banalización; banalización
English translation:passing loop; reversible working
Entered by: Parrot
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16:55 Jun 5, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping / railways
Spanish term or phrase: puestos de banalización
"Las entradas al nivel 1 de aplicación de ERTMS/ETCS se podrán realizar, al menos, en todas las Estaciones, Apartaderos, Puestos de Banalización, Puestos de Bloqueo y en los puntos de conexión con otras líneas no equipadas con ERTMS." TIA
Parrot
Spain
Local time: 17:30
banalización = reversible working; puesto de banalización = passing loop
Explanation:
Banalización is clearly reversible working:

Sur les voies utilisées dans les deux sens (banalisation), la signalisation doit être double et particulièrement efficace. La commande des signaux par induction, bien adaptée à l'automatisation, et qui évite le risque des mauvais contacts des roues et des balais métalliques, est en cours de développement.
http://fr.encyclopedia.yahoo.com/articles/na/na_1654_p0.html

Area: Signalling and security apparatus for railways IEV number: 821-01-24

EN: reversible working; two way working

FR: banalisation (des voies)
http://domino.iec.ch/iev/iev.nsf/fb10ff5e3d2aaec7c1256a40002...

In Britain trains usually keep to the lefthand track of a double line of railway, and it is this arrangement that is meant by the rule of the road. In some countries where there is very little double track any rule is of less significance since in almost all the countries surveyed there is no fixed rule about which track is used at passing loops on a single line route. In other countries reversible working is common and it may not be at all obvious which is the "normal" arrangement. Where the word "varies" appears under this heading, this situation is implied. Other countries with a wellestablished "rule" but having a certain amount of reversible working ("banalisation" is the French term for this) are distinguished by a note to that effect.
http://www.steane.com/egtre/general.htm

Apart from the ability to run trains continuously the double-track circuit with cross-overs will enable trains to change tracks to pass slower moving ones. This is a common practice and although it is normal to drive on the left most Swiss mainlines are signalled for reversible working for increased flexibility.
http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/john.whitby/message.htm

Based on the above, I think the whole phrase “puestos de banalización” may refer to the “passing loops” that were mentioned:

Having many trains on the same network of tracks requires a rail system to be tuned to perfection. If they aren't designed with great care, ratings will sink and money will be wasted by trains getting 'lost' on their way to stations - creating running costs without collecting any profit.
When the AI is servicing stations that are a long way apart it will have two-track stations at each end, and "passing loops" along the track.
The first problem with "passing loops" is that each train has to wait for its turn to use the "passing loop" - consequently, the number of days in transit will go up resulting in reduced profit. The second problem is that only three trains can be successfully run on a "passing loop" setup. Why? Because any more than that will result in a deadlock. (diagram included at this link, showing the passing loop) http://www.sgi.net/zeppelin/ttdlx/b-dual-tracks.html

passing loop
A passing loop is a section of track that runs parallel and connected at both ends to the main line. This allows, for example, two trains in opposite directions to cross each other, or a faster train to pass and overtake a slower one that is waiting in the loop. Passing loops are generally used on lines with only one track, and allows for increased running capabilities and minimalised running times.
http://qroti.com/glossary/passingloop.shtml

What do you think?
Selected response from:

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 17:30
Grading comment
Certainly goes with the Spanish definition found by Marcus and Bill; I was about to go along with multiple turnouts for the sake of common terminology, but I believe this is better. Thanks! Tonight it's my turn to do "guardia".
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1start of discussionMarcus Malabad
4banalización = reversible working; puesto de banalización = passing loopxxxtazdog
4multiple turnouts?xxxtazdog


  

Answers


46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
start of discussion


Explanation:
missy,

The dictionary at http://www.todotrenes.com/ defines banalización as:

Ocupación alternada, libre disposición

Still searching for the English term. The first link is a picture of trenes banalizadas. The second link below is a railroad glossary




    Reference: http://www.todotrenes.com/Fichas/verFichaFoto.asp?Foto=57
    Reference: http://content.honeywell.com/sensing/prodinfo/rail/technical...
Marcus Malabad
Canada
Local time: 17:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TagalogTagalog
PRO pts in category: 2

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bill Greendyk: Hi Marcus. I got as far as you did and gave up!
7 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
multiple turnouts?


Explanation:
How strange, I have this term as well! :-)

Here's what I found:

En la parte central de los túneles se construirá lo que, en términos ferroviarios, se llama un puesto de banalización, que no es más que un desvío múltiple que permite pasar a un tren de un túnel a otro y así evitar cualquier incidencia que pueda interrumpir la circulación.

I've been using "turnout" (suggested by María) for the desvío in this sense, as in the following text:

I have used the word "turnout" to describe the junctions in trackwork where lines diverge or converge so as to avoid "points" (UK) or "switches" (US), both of which terms can be confusing. In the railway "trade", turnouts are referred to as "switch and crossing work". A turnout consists of a number of parts as follows ... (and there follows a diagram--this is from the second link below).

I don't know if this is really what you call it, but it seems to make sense (to me, anyway!!)


    Reference: http://www.el-mundo.es/1999/07/28/madrid/28N0095.html
    Reference: http://www.trainweb.org/railwaytechnical/track.htm#Turnouts
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 17:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 148
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
banalización = reversible working; puesto de banalización = passing loop


Explanation:
Banalización is clearly reversible working:

Sur les voies utilisées dans les deux sens (banalisation), la signalisation doit être double et particulièrement efficace. La commande des signaux par induction, bien adaptée à l'automatisation, et qui évite le risque des mauvais contacts des roues et des balais métalliques, est en cours de développement.
http://fr.encyclopedia.yahoo.com/articles/na/na_1654_p0.html

Area: Signalling and security apparatus for railways IEV number: 821-01-24

EN: reversible working; two way working

FR: banalisation (des voies)
http://domino.iec.ch/iev/iev.nsf/fb10ff5e3d2aaec7c1256a40002...

In Britain trains usually keep to the lefthand track of a double line of railway, and it is this arrangement that is meant by the rule of the road. In some countries where there is very little double track any rule is of less significance since in almost all the countries surveyed there is no fixed rule about which track is used at passing loops on a single line route. In other countries reversible working is common and it may not be at all obvious which is the "normal" arrangement. Where the word "varies" appears under this heading, this situation is implied. Other countries with a wellestablished "rule" but having a certain amount of reversible working ("banalisation" is the French term for this) are distinguished by a note to that effect.
http://www.steane.com/egtre/general.htm

Apart from the ability to run trains continuously the double-track circuit with cross-overs will enable trains to change tracks to pass slower moving ones. This is a common practice and although it is normal to drive on the left most Swiss mainlines are signalled for reversible working for increased flexibility.
http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/john.whitby/message.htm

Based on the above, I think the whole phrase “puestos de banalización” may refer to the “passing loops” that were mentioned:

Having many trains on the same network of tracks requires a rail system to be tuned to perfection. If they aren't designed with great care, ratings will sink and money will be wasted by trains getting 'lost' on their way to stations - creating running costs without collecting any profit.
When the AI is servicing stations that are a long way apart it will have two-track stations at each end, and "passing loops" along the track.
The first problem with "passing loops" is that each train has to wait for its turn to use the "passing loop" - consequently, the number of days in transit will go up resulting in reduced profit. The second problem is that only three trains can be successfully run on a "passing loop" setup. Why? Because any more than that will result in a deadlock. (diagram included at this link, showing the passing loop) http://www.sgi.net/zeppelin/ttdlx/b-dual-tracks.html

passing loop
A passing loop is a section of track that runs parallel and connected at both ends to the main line. This allows, for example, two trains in opposite directions to cross each other, or a faster train to pass and overtake a slower one that is waiting in the loop. Passing loops are generally used on lines with only one track, and allows for increased running capabilities and minimalised running times.
http://qroti.com/glossary/passingloop.shtml

What do you think?


    as noted
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 17:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 148
Grading comment
Certainly goes with the Spanish definition found by Marcus and Bill; I was about to go along with multiple turnouts for the sake of common terminology, but I believe this is better. Thanks! Tonight it's my turn to do "guardia".
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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