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licorosidad

English translation: syrupy / liqueur-like

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:licoroso
English translation:syrupy / liqueur-like
Entered by: xxxtazdog
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14:13 Feb 13, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Wine / Oenology / Viticulture
Spanish term or phrase: licorosidad
As part of a description of a wine.

For example: "Esta añada destaca por su suavidad y untuosidad, dulzura y licorosidad".

Thanks in advance.
Jeremy Smith
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:41
syrupy - syrupiness
Explanation:
I'd reword it to use syrupy rather than syrupiness, but both are used.

Licoroso: vino muy dulce, rico en azúcar, más o menos almibarado.
http://www.arsytes.com.ar/vinos/cata.htm

syrupy
A winetasting term generally used to describe RICH, almost thick sweet wines such as a TROCKENBEERENAUSLESE. http://www.epicurious.com/tools/winedictionary/entry?id=8137

This one's French, but you can see it's the same root.

LIQUOREUX (SYRUPY)
http://www.chez.com/bibs/aglo.html

Examples in use in tasting notes:

Rich, hazelnuts, heady and almost syrupy. Hints of elderflower. Very vibrant but with a hint of glucose syrup. Very fresh but not massively heavy.
http://www.germanwine.net/tastingnotes/jancis2005.htm

Tasting Notes : A nose of crushed raspberries and juicy redcurrants moves onto a soft and glossy palate of berries and brambles, with just a hint of subtle syrupiness.
http://www.oddbins.com/products/productdetail.asp?productcod...
Selected response from:

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 06:41
Grading comment
This is the answer that seems best suited. My client got back to me on this, saying that most often, "liqueur-like" is used, even though it doesn't sound good at all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1syrupy - syrupinessxxxtazdog
3heady
Patricia Fierro, M. Sc.


  

Answers


41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
heady


Explanation:
Según el Simon and Schuster:

licoroso:
spirituous, alcoholic, generous, rich, heady (wine)

La palabra wine consta en el diccionario después de heady.

Heady:
heady
['hedɪ]
adjective (comp headier, superl headiest)
1 (intoxicating) embriagador,-ra, fuerte


Patricia Fierro, M. Sc.
Ecuador
Local time: 23:41
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
syrupy - syrupiness


Explanation:
I'd reword it to use syrupy rather than syrupiness, but both are used.

Licoroso: vino muy dulce, rico en azúcar, más o menos almibarado.
http://www.arsytes.com.ar/vinos/cata.htm

syrupy
A winetasting term generally used to describe RICH, almost thick sweet wines such as a TROCKENBEERENAUSLESE. http://www.epicurious.com/tools/winedictionary/entry?id=8137

This one's French, but you can see it's the same root.

LIQUOREUX (SYRUPY)
http://www.chez.com/bibs/aglo.html

Examples in use in tasting notes:

Rich, hazelnuts, heady and almost syrupy. Hints of elderflower. Very vibrant but with a hint of glucose syrup. Very fresh but not massively heavy.
http://www.germanwine.net/tastingnotes/jancis2005.htm

Tasting Notes : A nose of crushed raspberries and juicy redcurrants moves onto a soft and glossy palate of berries and brambles, with just a hint of subtle syrupiness.
http://www.oddbins.com/products/productdetail.asp?productcod...


xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 06:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 174
Grading comment
This is the answer that seems best suited. My client got back to me on this, saying that most often, "liqueur-like" is used, even though it doesn't sound good at all.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Janine Libbey
1 hr
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Changes made by editors
Feb 20, 2008 - Changes made by xxxtazdog:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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