spunnet socker - candy floss or something harder?

English translation: spun sugar

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Swedish term or phrase:spunnet socker
English translation:spun sugar
Entered by: Stefan A. M. Adamek

14:58 Jun 29, 2009
Swedish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Kometen kommer (av Tove Jansson)
Swedish term or phrase: spunnet socker - candy floss or something harder?
Kan "spunnet socker" syfta på något annat än vad som översätts som "candy floss", om det alltså används av en finlandssvensk? Här är kontexten:

Mumintrollets mamma satt i köket och dekorerade en krokan med skär vispgrädde. Runt omkring den stod det i vackra slingor av choklad: Till mitt älskade Mumintroll, och högst upp hade den en stjärna av spunnet socker.

Senare i samma kapitel står det dock:

Snälla Sniff, du kan väl inte ha ätit upp hela krokanen på vägen?
Den var för stor, sa Sniff nonchalant.
Så du åt i alla fall av den! skrek Mumintrollet.
Bara toppstjärnan och den var förmårrat hård! skrek Sniff tillbaka och så kröp han under madrassen.


Kan spunnet socker vara hårt? Eller kan uttrycket "spunnet socker" också beteckna något annat än spunnet socker - karamell/knäck/kola kanske?
A. Petrunova
Bulgaria
Local time: 14:50
spun sugar (as George already suggested)
Explanation:
Old and traditional method of dessert decoration dating back to 1400's.
It is made by dipping a fork into melted and sometimes dyed sugar, then rapidly flicking the fork back and forth over two sticks. This creates very fine straight strands of sugar that harden within a minute or two.

NOTE! There seem to be a total mixup between spun sugar and cotton candy everywhere I look online, all normally trustded sources have it either wrong or redirect the term to the other variations of suger candy like cotton etc..

Cotton candy is a modern version of spun sugar that was invented in 1897 by William Morrison and John C. Wharton.


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Note added at 3 hrs (2009-06-29 18:12:08 GMT)
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I posted this since I could not figure out how to get enough space for explanation, definition and links.
This is something that I learned at the Culinary Academy long long time ago.
Selected response from:

Stefan A. M. Adamek
United States
Local time: 04:50
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2cotton candy
Shawn Champion
5spun sugar (as George already suggested)
Stefan A. M. Adamek
4 +1spun sugar
George Hopkins
3 +1caramel
Paul Lambert
3cotton candy frosting
Gabriella Jönsson


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
cotton candy


Explanation:
It is literally spun sugar. Do a Google image search of your term and you'll find many like the one linked to below.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_kGCwJFOrZ7I/R5MgqiEZKdI/AAAAAAAAAL...

Shawn Champion
Sweden
Local time: 13:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  TechLawDC
1 hr

disagree  Stefan A. M. Adamek: Cotton Candy är det i USA vanligen förekomande namnet på vad man i Sverige kallar sockervadd ...
1 hr

agree  niclashjerth
4 hrs

agree  asptech
15 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cotton candy frosting


Explanation:
Jag kan tänka mig att termen spunnet socker i det här fallet refererar snarare till ett slags kristyrsocker. Lite efterforskning ledde mig till termen "cotton candy frosting" som används nedan och verkar stämma överens med beskrivningen av Muminmammans toppstjärna.


    Reference: http://www.foreverandadaygiftboutique.com/cocafrcabita.html
Gabriella Jönsson
Sweden
Local time: 13:50
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
caramel


Explanation:
Just looking around and I found a recipe for "spunnet socket" which refers to a hard caramel added to a desert. See below.


    Reference: http://recept.nu/1.178468/recept.nu_redaktionen/efterratter_...
Paul Lambert
Sweden
Local time: 13:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gabriella Jönsson
15 mins
  -> Thanks!
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
spun sugar


Explanation:
:-

George Hopkins
Local time: 13:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 13

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sebastian Sussmann: google image searches confirm this and explanation below, seems that in swedish cand floss/cotton candy and spun sugar use same word
19 hrs
  -> Thank you Sebastian.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
spun sugar (as George already suggested)


Explanation:
Old and traditional method of dessert decoration dating back to 1400's.
It is made by dipping a fork into melted and sometimes dyed sugar, then rapidly flicking the fork back and forth over two sticks. This creates very fine straight strands of sugar that harden within a minute or two.

NOTE! There seem to be a total mixup between spun sugar and cotton candy everywhere I look online, all normally trustded sources have it either wrong or redirect the term to the other variations of suger candy like cotton etc..

Cotton candy is a modern version of spun sugar that was invented in 1897 by William Morrison and John C. Wharton.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2009-06-29 18:12:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I posted this since I could not figure out how to get enough space for explanation, definition and links.
This is something that I learned at the Culinary Academy long long time ago.

Example sentence(s):
  • As early as the 1400's, European chefs were spinning extravagant desserts out of sugar.
  • the confectioner had a few moments to pull a glob out of the bowl with a fork or whisk and then fling the hot mixture through the air.

    Reference: http://www.squidoo.com/cotton-candy-history
    Reference: http://www.squidoo.com/cotton-candy-history
Stefan A. M. Adamek
United States
Local time: 04:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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