lönekrona

English translation: 'krona' (meaning kronas paid for work)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Swedish term or phrase:lönekrona
English translation:'krona' (meaning kronas paid for work)
Entered by: Helen Johnson

10:33 May 26, 2004
Swedish to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Economics / business book
Swedish term or phrase: lönekrona
Anyone know what this is, please, in terms of company economics and benchmarking? Sentence: Säkerligen utfördes inspektionerna med hög produktivitet - dvs många semlor per lönekrona eller arbetstimme inspekterades. It isn't another word for 'arbetstimme', is it?
Thanks in advance,
Helen
Helen Johnson
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:08
shilling
Explanation:
This may seem an off the wall, mad suggestion, and probsably is. But for me the Swedish word "semlor" introduces a tone of levity, of tongue in cheekiness, about these financial inspections and their high productivity. So, just as young men were once persuaded to join the army by the offer of the "King's shilling", now these modern benchmarkers are inspecting lots of of figures, described here with tongue firmly in cheek as "many buns to the shilling" (OK, many old-fashoined traditional cream buns with almont paste eaten during Lent) to the hourly inspoectors' fee (expressed in old-fashoined traditional shillings (very approx = 1 krona). Anyway, that's my guess, speaking as a great fan of semlor and shillings, but with low confidence.
Selected response from:

Peter Linton
Local time: 01:08
Grading comment
Thanks, Peter - I partly used this idea, but not the word, as it seemed too old fashioned for the overall modernity of the text. Your answer confirmed the underlying principle though.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1Problem with accents
hirselina
4unit payment
George Hopkins
2shilling
Peter Linton


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Problem with accents


Explanation:
lönekrona: it's a krona spent for wages (lön)

hirselina
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in DutchDutch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine Andersen: It looks a little figurative to me 'companies producing lots of 'buns' (goods) per krone in wages. PS. I can see the accents!
8 mins
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
lönekrona
unit payment


Explanation:
Or 'unit labour costs' is perhaps even better, ie, including all labour costs and not just the direct wage or salary.

George Hopkins
Local time: 02:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 10
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
lönekrona
shilling


Explanation:
This may seem an off the wall, mad suggestion, and probsably is. But for me the Swedish word "semlor" introduces a tone of levity, of tongue in cheekiness, about these financial inspections and their high productivity. So, just as young men were once persuaded to join the army by the offer of the "King's shilling", now these modern benchmarkers are inspecting lots of of figures, described here with tongue firmly in cheek as "many buns to the shilling" (OK, many old-fashoined traditional cream buns with almont paste eaten during Lent) to the hourly inspoectors' fee (expressed in old-fashoined traditional shillings (very approx = 1 krona). Anyway, that's my guess, speaking as a great fan of semlor and shillings, but with low confidence.

Peter Linton
Local time: 01:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 13
Grading comment
Thanks, Peter - I partly used this idea, but not the word, as it seemed too old fashioned for the overall modernity of the text. Your answer confirmed the underlying principle though.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  George Hopkins: Surely, tongue in cheekness?
16 hrs
  -> Certainly, though I prefer to call it devil's advocacy.
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