plåster (into US English)

English translation: band-aid

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Swedish term or phrase:plåster (into US English)
English translation:band-aid
Entered by: Ingemar Kinnmark

10:51 Jun 4, 2010
Swedish to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical: Health Care
Swedish term or phrase: plåster (into US English)
For a text to be read by Americans, would it be confusing to call it "plaster"? Is "adhesive bandage" the correct term, and is it readily understood also by non-US readers?
Jan Sundström
Sweden
Local time: 18:31
band-aid
Explanation:
See reference below.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2010-06-04 10:56:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

From Wikipedia:

Band-Aid is brand name for Johnson & Johnson's line of adhesive bandages and related products. It has also become something of genericized trademark for any adhesive bandage in Australia, Brazil, Canada, India and United States.

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band-Aid


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2010-06-04 10:58:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The word "band-aid" is simply what everyone calls it in the U.S. , I have learned after living here in the U.S. for 30 years.
Selected response from:

Ingemar Kinnmark
Local time: 12:31
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
2 +8band-aid
Ingemar Kinnmark
3band-aid
ECCommunication


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
band-aid


Explanation:
If you are looking for a layman's term I'd suggest band-aid :o)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2010-06-04 10:57:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/band-aid


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band-aid
ECCommunication
Norway
Local time: 18:31
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +8
band-aid


Explanation:
See reference below.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2010-06-04 10:56:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

From Wikipedia:

Band-Aid is brand name for Johnson & Johnson's line of adhesive bandages and related products. It has also become something of genericized trademark for any adhesive bandage in Australia, Brazil, Canada, India and United States.

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band-Aid


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2010-06-04 10:58:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The word "band-aid" is simply what everyone calls it in the U.S. , I have learned after living here in the U.S. for 30 years.


Ingemar Kinnmark
Local time: 12:31
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anna Herbst: I agree and you were first.
11 mins
  -> Tack Anna!

agree  Christine Andersen: And even we Brits know what it is ;-)
25 mins
  -> Tack Christine!

agree  Paul Lambert: Yes. A brand-name that has gone generic. I would still write it with upper case letters, however.
5 hrs
  -> Tack Paul!

agree  asptech: "Plaster" of course means something else, so I think "Band-Aid" will in most cases convey the correct meaning, but you should be aware that "plåster" is also used in other medical contexts that have nothing to do with "Band-Aid".
6 hrs
  -> Tack asptech!

agree  David Singer
7 hrs
  -> Tack David!

agree  Tania McConaghy: the term also works in Asutralia!
7 hrs
  -> Tack Tania!

agree  Bianca Marsden-Day: I agree 'band-aid' (though I am UK Eng not US Eng) but I think it is true it has gone generic. I would leave it in lower case.
1 day 6 hrs
  -> Tack Bianca!

agree  sans22 (X)
6 days
  -> Tack sschill!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search